Sacred Latin poetry: chiefly lyrical, selected and arranged for use

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John W. Parker, 1849 - Hymns, Latin - 316 pages
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Page 310 - And wheresoever he taketh him, he teareth him ; and he foameth and gnasheth with his teeth, and pineth away ; and I spake to thy disciples that they should cast him out, and they could not.
Page 44 - So ist's mit aller Bildung auch beschaffen. Vergebens werden ungebundne Geister Nach der Vollendung reiner Höhe streben. Wer Großes will, muß sich zusammenraffen. In der Beschränkung zeigt sich erst der Meister, Und das Gesetz nur kann uns Freiheit geben.
Page 174 - Butter of kine and milk of sheep, With fat of lambs, and rams of the breed of Bashan, And goats, with the fat of kidneys of wheat; And thou didst drink the pure blood of the grape.
Page 192 - Thy truth we may steadfastly look up to heaven, and by faith behold the glory that shall be revealed ; and being filled with the Holy Ghost, may learn to love and bless our persecutors by the example of Thy first Martyr Saint Stephen, who prayed for his murderers to Thee, O blessed Jesus, Who standest at the right hand of God to succour all those that suffer for Thee, our only Mediator and Advocate.
Page iii - Latin poetry, such as they shall be able entirely and heartily to accept and approve — a collection, that is, in which they shall not be evermore liable to be offended, and to have the current of their sympathies checked, by coming upon that which, however beautiful as poetry, out of higher respects they must reject and condemn — in which, too, they shall not fear that snares are being laid for them, to entangle them unawares in admiration for ought which is inconsistent with their faith and...
Page 203 - Quam dilecta tabernacula tua, Domine virtutum ! concupiscit, et deficit anima mea in atria Domini.
Page 48 - Circled with evil, till his very soul Unmoulds its essence, hopelessly deformed By sights of evermore deformity ! — With other ministrations thou, O Nature ! Healest thy wandering and distempered child : Thou pourest on him thy soft influences, Thy sunny hues, fair forms, and breathing sweets ; Thy melodies of woods, and winds, and waters ! Till he relent, and can no more endure To be a jarring and a dissonant thing Amid this general dance and minstrelsy ; But, bursting into tears, wins back his...
Page 122 - Omnis vigor atque viror Hinc recessit, non admiror, Mors apparet in aspectu, Totus pendens in defectu, Attritus aegra macie.
Page iii - ... their sympathies checked, by coming upon that which, however beautiful as poetry, out of higher respects they must reject and condemn — in which, too, they shall not fear that snares are being laid for them, to entangle them unawares in admiration for ought which is inconsistent with their faith and fealty to their own spiritual mother
Page 180 - Nihil est innoxium. Lava quod est sordidum, Riga quod est aridum, Sana quod est saucium, Flecte quod est rigidum, Fove quod est frigidum, Rege quod est devium.

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