Page images
PDF
EPUB

PAGE

common law of nations, 89; How Mr. George holds the absolute communism of

the land, 90 ; How the new theory would subordinate the supreme authority in

society to the will of each individual, 91 ; Reasoning that runs counter to sound

princíple, 92 ; Nature of individualism, 93 ; The theory of absolute individualism

leads to inconsistency and absurdity, 94.

THE APOSTLE OF ALASKA. By Rer. Henry Van Rensselaer, S.J., . . 95

The characteristic work of Archbishop Seghers, 95 ; How he chose to labor in the

Vancouver Mission, 96 ; His zsal for the conversion of the Indians, 97; An appa-

rently miraculous restoration of health, 98; Father Seghers is made a bishop, 99;

Another visit to the Indians on the west coast of Vancouver, 100; Showing a spe-
cial predilection for Alaska, 101 ; Describing his northern journey, 102 ; The in-
dians on the Yukon river, 103 ; Return from Alaska, 104 ; His labors as coadjutor
to the Archbishop of Oregon, 105; He succeeds to that see, 106: His tribute to

Archbishop Blanchet, 107; Resigning this See to return to Alaska, 108 ; Charae-

teristic appeal for his far-off mission, 109 ; Again in the wild North, 110; Invested

a second time with the pallium, 111 ; His second trip on the Yukon, 112; Graphic

description of an adventurous journey, 113 ; How he came by his death, 115 ; His

body removed to St. Michael's, 116; Account of the wretched murderer, 117: The

most fitting monument Catholics can erect to Archbishop Seghers's memory, 118.

DOES THE END JUSTIFY THE MEANS? By Rt. Rev. James A. Corcoran, D.D. 119

A Jesuit theologian's strange oversight, 119; How “ Bishop" Coxe repeats a

threadbare false charge, 120; Paul Bert as a witness, 121 ; A mutilated quotation

from Busenbaum, 122 ; His rational solution of a knotty point, 123 ; Rev. Dr. Little-

dale's dishonesty, 124 ; Painting his own character, 123 ; Garbled quotations from

Laymann and Wagemann, 126 , The sound doctrine that all the Jesuits teach, 127;

How a German preacher met the same old charges years ago, 128 : A proud dis-

tinction for the Jesuits, 129.

An English Public SCHOOL OF A PAST GENERATION. By W. Marsham

Adams,

. . 130

Some strange fancies of youth and manhood, 130: The town of Winchester and

Chancellor Wykeham's foundation there, 131 ; A first glance at the ancient

school, 132; The first objects of interest inside the gate, 133 ; An elaborate organi-

zation for such a small body, 134 ; Only a part of its founder's munificence, 135 ;

How admission to the college was secured, 136; Election ceremonies and fagging,

137; A fair proficiency attained in studies, 139; Close of the course there, 140.

ANDOVER ORTHODOXY-WHITHER AWAY? By Rev. Alfred Young, C.S.P.,. 141

A remarkable volume of theological essays, 141 ; The dominant idea presented to

us in this volume, 142 ; Strength of the Andover teaching, 143; How the essays

treat the fundamental doctrines of religion, 144; What the whole and sole purpose

of the Christian religion is, 145 ; Their affirmation of the religious keystone, 146 ;

How creation affirms itself, 147 : Theological reasoning applicable to the ethical

order, 14%; The divine idea of humanity and its ethical relations, 149 ; God's re-

generation of humanity, 150 ; What the principle of redemption here set forth

plainly shows, 151 ; Exposition of the essayist's logical position, 152: A sublime

and beautiful expression of Catholic dogma, 154 ; The Andover theologians have

not yet realized the logical consequences of their doctrines, 155 ; How the essay-

ists put a great truth, 156 ; How only & universal Christianity can be affirmed, 157.

SCIENTIFIC CHRONICLE. By Rev. J. M. Degni, SJ.,. ...

158

The British Association, 158 ; Induction Telegraphy, 160 ; Aluminium bronze as a

gun-metal, 161 ; Two international scientific meetings. 163 ; Minor items—two new

inventions, solar physics, 164; electric storage batteries, 165.

THE LAW OF NATURE DIVINE AND SUPREME. By His Eminence Cardinal

Manning,...

193

The relief of the poor in England, 193; Sacred foundation of the Poor Law, 194;

St. Thomas's statement of the doctrine of the Catholic Church, 195; American

comments on the Cardinal's views, 196 ; Their superiority to English comments,

197 ; How primary truths of human life are forgotten, 198.

PROFEssor HUXLEY'S DEMURRER. By Paul R. Shipman,

199

Huxley's definition of Materialism, 199 ; In what his demurrer consists, 200 ; His

treatment of consciousness as a function of the brain, 201; Weakness of his illus.

tration of his argument, 202; Relation of consciousness to matter and force, 203 ;

Professor Huxley against himself, 201 ; Is an effect of the same nature as its cause?

205 ; Relations of knowledge to states of consciousness, 206 ; What the mind is

capable of knowing, according to Huxley's theory, 207 ; Defensive value of his

stronghold, 208 : The file he has in this instance to bite, 209; Huxley, as well as

Homer, sometimes nods, 210.

AMERICA DISCOVERED AND CHRISTIANIZED IN THE TENTH AND ELEVEXTH

CENTURIES. By Richard H. Clarke, LL D.,

... 211

Recent memorials of the Northmen's stay on our continent, 211 ; Columbus and

the Northmen, 212; What caused the westward wanderings of the latter, 213 ;

Thorwald and Eric, 214 ; The Greenland colony of Northmen, 215 : Their exter-

mination by pestilence, 216; The Norse discoverer of the first land of our conti-
nent, 217 : Eric and Heriulf, 218; Consequences of the conversion of a king of
Norway, 219; (onversion of Leif and his voyage to the west and south, 220 ; His
German companion, Tyrker, 221; Location of Vinland, 221; It was probably the
modern Rhode Island," 222; Conflict with the Esquimaux, 223; Death and burial

PAGE

of Thorvald Ericson, 224; The most remarkable expedition to Vinland was that

of Thorfin Karlsafne, 225: Vinland becomes famous in Greenland story, 226 ;

Trouble caused by Thorhall, 227 ; Records of Norse attempts at colonization 28;

More of Thorfin and Thorhall, 29; (hildren of prophecy and favorite of for-

tune, 230 ; The expedition in which Freydis flourished. 231; Devastation of the

Vinland Colony. 232: An interesting poem preserved at Copenhagen, 233 : " An-

cient Ballad of Finn the Fair," 231; Had Columbus any kniwledge of the Norse

discoveries? 236.

THE PRESENT ATTITUDE OF ENGLAND TƏWARDS THE HOLY SEE. By
Arthur F. Marshall. B. A. (Oxon.),

138

The English attitude nota religious one, 238 ; Indifferentism the real enemy of the

Catholic Church to-day. 239 ; Distinctions between the England of to-day and that

of thirty years ago. 21; Attach and unattached members of England's national

church, 211; Anglicans condemning their own sect, 242: Oddities of life in the

Anglican ministry, 213 ; Some few Ritualists still in earnest, 244; The average An-

glican's idea of the Holy See, 213: The governmental and social phases of Eng-
land's attitude towards Rome, 216 ; Indifferentism the kernel of the whole mat-

ter, 247: What the working-classes think and say about the Pope. 219 ; Attitudes

of the thinking class, 249; They seem not to know that faith is a Divine gitt, 250;

An exceptional school of haters of Rome, 251 ; Not doctrine, but assertion of a

priestly prerogative, alarms the Ritualist, 252; Summing up the causes of Eng.

land's dread of things Roman, 253.

THE CHURCH AND HISTORICAL SCIENCE. By Prof. Charles G. IIerbermann,

P.),

255

The change that has of late years come over non-Catholic literature, 255; What is

meant by historical criticisin, 256: Mabillon and other masters of the art, 2:17; No-

ble rivalry of the Jesuits and the Benedictines, 258 : The Isidorian Decretals and

Constantine's Donation, 258; The Bollandists. 259; They and other (atholic writ-

ers eulogized by Protestants. 260: Multiplication and publication of ancient docu-

ments not a modern invention, 261 ; Works of men born and bred in the Catholic

Church, 262 : The great fault of historians who write to support a doctrinal thesis,

263 ; Canon Stokes on the value of the Bollandists' great work, 261; Wattenbach on

the French Benedictines, 265; Other Catholic writers of history, 266 : Very little done

in Germany before the present century. 267; Modern work done in England, 268 :

The stimulus given to historic studies by the present Pope, 269.

THE RIGHT OF INDIVIDUAL OWNERSHIP-DOES IT SPRING FROM THE

NATURAL OR THE Iluman Law? By Vgr. J de Concilio,

270

Statement of the two prevailing opinions among Catholics as to ownership, 270 ;

Statement of the problem as to land, 271 ; Differences between the two rules of ac-

tion, 272; Character of the jus gentium, 273; The common opinion of the Compact-

ists, 275; Objections raised by modern Catholic writers, 277 ; Admissions which

the Compactists freely make, 280 ; The sanction of the natural law an essential

condition to every human law, 281; Principles loudly proclaimed by the natural

law, 282; The Compactists deny the necessity of holding goods in private, 283 ;

Would stealing in their system be an evil act, 284; What Billuart says on the sub-

ject, 285; Views of other writers, 286 ; What makes a man a proprietor, 287; A final

reason against the Compact theory, 288 ; Summing up the argument of modern

(Catholic authors against it. 291 ; Those who have held the opinion of the Natural-

ists, 292; Opinious of theologians, 293 ; Statement of the salient points of the mod-

ern system, 294 ; Its import and significance, 295; A doubt as to the right of occu-

pancy, 296 ; Statement of other modern principles, 297 : Whenee do the rights come

to the State? 298 ; Modern authors on an objection of the Compactists, 299 ; Neces-

sity of private ownership, 301: What positions the Compactists and Naturalists

must respectively maintain, 303.

THE RE-UNION OF CHRISTENDOM. By Rt. Rev. John J. Keane, D.D., ... 304

A recent incident showing alarm in the Anglican Church, 304 ; l'ncertain position

of the Established Church in England, 306; A problem whose solution depends on

the will of God, 307; How Catholics should be disposed towards their erring breth-

ren, 308; There is little reason why we should now meet them as controversialists,

309; Futility of the “* Branch" theory, 310 ; The policy of good sense, truth and

charity, 311 ; We are bound to offer the most ample educational advantages, 312;

This is an additional reason for the establishment of the Catholic University of

America, 313.

GOLD FIELDS AND OTHER UNWORKED TREASURES OF IRELAND. By John

Boyle O'Reilly, .

. 314

Ireland's material resources demand our consideration, 314; Summary of her min-

eral treasures, 315; Ancient and modern evidences of a great wealth of gold, 316 :

Gold produced in Ireland in the present century, 318; Many minerals to be found

in a single mine, 319 ; A parliamentary investigation on Irish minerals, 320; Wick-

low's wealth, 321 ; Why the Irish gold tields are not worked, 322 ; Possible profit from

the workable silver in Wicklow, 323; Very little gold worked recently, 324 ; Ireland

ought to be the home of many industries, 325.

PROTESTANT INTEREST IN PATRISTIC LITERATURE. By Rt. Rev. James .1.

Corcoran, D.D., ...

327

The recent revival of interest in the Fathers, 327; Protestantism swallowed up in

rationalism, 328; A recent edition of St. Augustin's letters, 329 ; Reprehensible in-

dexing, 330) ; Wilful perversion of Biblical nomenclature, 331 : St. Augustine's

treatise on Christian doctrine, 332 ; Trying to pervert the belief in prayers for the

dead, 333 ; St. Augustine and creature worship, 394.

THE WEAPONS OF SO-CALLED MODERN SCIENCE. By Rev. W. Poland, S.J., 335

The animal ethics of to-day the natural outcome of Protestantism, 335; How the

old religious battle-ground has changed, 334; Danger of the quiet growth of Positiv.

ism. 337; The two great divisions of natural science, 3338 ; Character of knowledg

according to modern scientists, 339; The part played by so-called erudition, 311;

Science writing its own epitaph, 312; Scientific knowledge easy to be acquired,

313; The great work that defenders of religion have to do, 341.

FEDERAL SCHEMES TJ AID COMMON SCHOOLS IN THE SOUTHERN STATES.

By John Gilmiry Shea, LL.D.,

345

An educational symptom of danger to our Federal Government, 345; A well-laid
scheme to nationalize education, 346; Senator Blair's early efforts in this direction,
317; His faulty statistics, 348; His project essentially sectarian, 319; Has Congress
a right to appropriate money for public schools, 350; Senator Hawley's objection
to the Blair Bill, 351; Where the Bill now rests, 3.52: The objections to it clearly re.
stated, 353; School statistics of the Southern States 3.51; Senator Blair's revised
pamphlet, 3..7; His hatred of Catholicity, 336; How little he knows about the Jesuits,

357; Evil results of Federal control of public schools, 35%.

SCIENTIFIC CHRONICLE By Rev. J. M. Degni, S. J.,

300

Catholic scientific meeting, 360; Spectrum analysis and the Rowland gratings, 361;

The mineral resources of the l'nited States. 365: Isolation of fluorine and the

chemical theories, 367; Electric items, 369 ; Minor items, 371.

THE LATEST HISTORIAN OF THE INQUISITION. By Rev. R. S. Dewey, S.J., · 385

Mr. Lea's value as a teacher of history, 385; He lacks theological training neces-

sary for his subject. 336; He foresaw his difficulties, but did not avoid them, 387;

The examination necessary for every student to make, 388; An illustration in

point, 349; Mr. Lea on the Church's position in the twelfth century, 390 ; His work

deserves to be judged harshly, 391; Peculiarities of his position against the Church,

392: His utter ignorance of Catholic theology. 393; How he perverts his testimony,

391; Evidence from a medieval nu, 395: What is necessary to a correct under-

standing of the Inquisition, 396; The two capital sins of our would-be historian,

397; His favors to be regarded with suspicion, 398; The book filled with nasty

anecdotes, 399; Does it show evidence of real historical research ? 100; How he ig-

nores Catholic writers of history, 401; Mr. Lea's true worth as a teacher of history,

403; He has proved his incompetency to deal with the material he has gathered,

404.

ART AND RELIGION. By Peter L. Foy,

405

The fine arts in modern civilization, 405 ; Is there a necessary relation between

religion and art ? 406; The genesis of art, 407; What religion has had to do with

the development of the fine arts, 408; How long the decadence of art has been

going on, 109, All Christian art purely religious, 110: How old is the relation be-

tween Christianity and art ? 111; The Pagan temple and the Christian Church, 412;

The primary purpose of Christian art, 113 ; Roman art declined with Roman Su-

premacy, 414; Art in the early Middle Ages, 415; The Byzantines out of line, 416 ;

Christian art in the "dark"ages, 417; Marvels of artistic beauty, 418; Inestimable

legacies bequeathed by the “dark" ages to later times. 419; Characteristics of the

later Middle Ages, 420 ; What Gothic architecture represented, 421 ; How all the

arts harmoniously worked together, 122: Where Gothic architecture bad its purest

development, 423; The religious life of the Middle Ages, 424; Real beginning and

growth of the so-called Renaissance, 426; The high place in art held by the illu-

minations, 428 ; Where the poetic inspiration of art came from, 429.

JOHANNES JANSSEN, GERMANY's GREAT HISTORIAN. By John A. Mooney, 429

The modern improvements in the method of writing history, 429 ; Janssen's con-

spicuous place as a historian, 130 : Sketch of his life, 431; Character and result of

his life of Wibald, 432; Wibald's influence on his age. 133; Janssen in the in-

tellectual life of Frankfurt, 434; His intimacy with Böhmer, 435; His services as a

student of art, 136 ; From art he digresses into history. 437; Böhmer's character and

influence, 138; Janssen adopts his views of history and historians, 139; He shows

the worthlessness of schiller as a historian, 140 ; His view of the struggle for the

Rhineland, 142; Showing France as an ally of Protestantism, 443 ; Writing the life

of his friend and teacher, 444; The growth of German rationalism, 445 ; Janssen's

estimate of Humboldt, 447 ; And of Schopenhauer, 148; Influence of religion on sci-

ence and literature, 449 ; Studies on Bunsen, 450; Politicians admitting the weak-

ness of a divided Protestantism. 452 ; The uncertain foundation of the present

German empire, 433; Effect of Bismarck's policy, 453 ; Indictment of the one

purely Protestant State, 136 ; The attention attracted in Germany by Janssen's

writings. 457; A man gifted with rare powers of observation and analysis, 458;

His great work, the "History of the German People," 460; Why Catholics should

be proud of its author, 461.

BUDDHISU AND CHRISTIANITY COMPARED. By Rev. R. Parsons, D.D., : . 462

The three universalist religions, 162:

What we know of the origin of Buddhism,

463 ; Account of the Buddha, 164; The literature bearing upon him, 466 ; De

Broglie's theory and its refutation, 467; All that we know about the Nirvana, 468 ;

The moral doctrine of Buddhism, 470; Resemblance between Buddhism and

Christianity, 471; The life of Christ and Sakya Muni compared, 472; The marvel-

lously rapid propagation of Christianity, 474; Effect of Buddhism on the people

who have accepted it, 477.

PAGE

TWENTY-FOUR YEARS in BrENOS AYRES. By M. A. C., . .. · 478

Arrival of Irish Sisters of Mercy in Buenos Ayres, 478: The city was then one vast

pest house, 479; Quiet intervals between visitations of yellow fever, 480 ; Life at

Buenos Ayres and the Sisters' work, 481 ; Sketch of Mother M. Evangelista Fitzpat-

rick, 182; Revolutionary outbreak against the religious orders, 483; À terrible scene

described by an eye-witness, 481; Relations between Buenos Ayres and New Or.

leans, 485; The infidels trying to force unworthy members into religion, 487;

Withdrawal of the Sisterhood from Buenos Ayres, 189; Their voyage to Australia,

489; Mother Evangelista's residence in Adelaide, 490 ; The intellectual life of the

Order, 491; It has prospered in its new home, 492.

INDUCTION, ANCIENT AND MODERN. By Rev. R. F. Clarke, SJ., .... 493

Inductive science and modern research, 493 : Gains and losses from its use, 491 ;

Definition of induction, 195 ; Distinction between complete and incomplete induc-

tion, 496: How complete induction is of practical usefulness, 497; The weak point

of a complete induction, 498; Incomplete or material induction, 499; Cardinal Zig-

liara on the force of an induction. 500 ; Illustrations of this method of argument,

501; Why it concerns us to investigate the subject. 502; Relation of induction to

the physical laws, 03; The importance of distinguishing between certitude and

probability, 504; Character of the instances on which a law must be based, 505 ;

The method of difference, 506; A case in illustration, 507; Practical and physical

certainty, 509; The true place of the inductive methods, 510.

THE BATTLE WITH ANTICHRIST IN FRANCE By Mgr. Bernard O' Reilly, D.D, 512

The two hosts that are in conflict in France, 512; Facts justifying the title of this

article, 513; The policy to which those in authority are pledged, 514; Organization

of a revolutionary society, 515; Animated spirit of the organization, 516; Freema-

sonry coming boldly into the light of day, 518 : M. Renan as an apostle of Anti-

christ, 519; A minister taking public part. 520; Activity of Catholic life in France,

521; Movements of the Catholic forces, 522; Outcome of the zeal of Mgr. de Ségur,

523 ; Splendid results of Catholic work, 524; A splendid declaration from Arch-

bishop Richard, 525; The work of Christian education, 527; Timely words from

M. Chesnelong, 528; What the Catholic schools should do, 529 ; Hopes realized,

530; Importance of making the home truly Catholic, 531.

The New PENAL CODE IN ITALY. By John Gilmary Shea, LL.D.,

532

Beginning of the seizure of the Papal States, 532 ; Perfidy of Napoleon III., 533 ;

Aggressiveness of the present infidel power of Italy, 534 ; Calumny preparing

the way for robbery, 535; The Italian peasantry overburdened with taxes, 536 ;

Crime increasing and government influence waving, 537; The new penal code con-

demned on all sides, 538; The issue to which Signor Crispi has brought the Roman

question, 539; The Catholic party is the only salvation of the Government, 540 ;

The protest of the Holy Father against the Code, 541; Crispi falsifying the actual
state of the case, 612; The Chamber's discourtesy to the Bishops, 513; The Pope

compelled to lay his case before the governments of the world, 514.

THE ATTACK ON FREEDOM OF EDUCATION IN MASSACHUSET IS. By Prof.

Thomix Dwight, M.D.,

545

Condition of the Church in Massachusetts, 545 ; Laws concerning private schools

explained, 546; An unwarranted bill to amend the existing law, 5-17; There was

no necessity for such a measure, 548; Action of the Committee on Education, 549;

President Elliott's views on education, 350; The anti-Catholic champions heard

from, 551; Able non-Catholic opponents of the bill, 552; The two points made

clear by the discussion, 553; The political part of the anti-Catholic movement, 554.

THE CONCORD SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY. By Condé B. Pallen, Ph.D., 555

The Concord standing ground and that of the Catholics, 555; Kantism, space and

experience, 556 ; Objects and their environment, 557; An insight into the consti-

tution of space, 558; Summing up of the Concord views on space and time, 559;

The Concord doctrine of " (uusa sui,” 561 ; Concordian causality and the notion

of the Deity, 562 ; Its blunders as to the activity of the First Cause, 564; Concord

and Aristotie, 565.

THE RELATIVE INFLUENCE OF PAGANISM AND CHRISTIANITY ON HUMAN

SLAVERY. By His Eminence Cardinal Gibbons,

577

Views of the Holy Father and Cardinal Lavigerie, 577 ; Slavery in the civilized

world before Christ came, 578; Wretched condition of slaves in pagan times, 579;

Obvious result of an unbealthy sentiment, 580; Slavery working the debauchery of

morals, 581 ; The excesses of slavery mitigated by Christianity, 582 ; The example

set by Christ, 583; How the Church abolished distinctions between bond and free,

584; The most substantial service rendered by the Church to the slaves, 585 ; Rela-

tive influence of Paganism and Christianity on slavery, 586 : Pope Leo XIII.'s de-

nunciation of the African slave trade, 587; The Church the friend of pagan as

well as of Christian slaves, 588.

THE MYTHS OF THE “DARK” AGES. By Prof. Charles G. Herbermann, Ph.D., 589

Catholicity has nothing to fear from historical science and scholarship, 589; Dif-

ference between the old and the revised views of the Middle Ages, 590; Principles

necessary for a correct judgment of the times, 591 ; How misrepresentation is being

abandoned, 592 ; Ch of views regarding the Popes, 593 ; Gregory VII. as an ex-

ample, 594 ; The Popes of the tenth century, 596; Better men than Protestants have

[ocr errors]

THE DIOCESE OF QUEBEC UNDER EARLY British RULE. By D. A. O'Sul-

livin, LL.D (Layıl),
The change of regime in Canada, 629 : Legal inconsistencies of the first half cen-
tury of British rule, 630; The ecclesiastical administration at the time of the trans-
fer,631 ; Filling the first vacancy in the see of Quebec, 632 : Claiming the rights pos-
sessed in Catholic countries, 633 : Hard nuts for Protestant bigots to crack. 6:1; The
governor instructed to safeguard the king's supremacy, 1135 ; The policy directed
by the Duke of Portland, 636 ; An opportunity for a Protestant bigot to urge a
change, 637 ; But he did not -ucceed, 638 ; Loyalty of the Canadian clergy to the
British crown, 639; Perilous position of the Church, 610; More liberal rulers come
into power. 611; Condition of affairs at the time of the war of 1812, 642; Final sur-
render of claims by the Crown, 613.

644

THE CHURCH AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By Mgr. Bernard O'Reilly,

D.D.,..

The story of Babel as a warning to France, 614; Temporary success of the city of

Satan, 615; The Church and the world in the last hundred years, 616; France now

on the verge of a volcano, 617; Masterly policy of the conspirators of 1789, 618; The

Civil Constitution of the Clergy, 619; The Church enslaved and despoiled, 650 :

Substituting worldly for ecclesiastical machinery, 651; Forbidding the publication

of Pontifical letters, 652; Beginning of outrageous violence against the Catholics,

653; Servility of King Louis XVI., 674: Wholesale imprisonment of Catholics, 6.35;

Assuming absolute power of proscription. 656; Disorganization of the old military

force, 657; The massacres and the abolition of royalty, 638 ; The revolutionists

take to destroying one another, 639; The exiled French priests, 660 ; The same

policy revived in our day, 661; Magnitude of the battle in which French Catho-

lics have to engage, 662.

ANGELS AND MINISTERS OF GRACE. By M., ...

The Creation of the world, 663 ; The principal among the angels, 661; Fall of the

rebel angels, 665; Records of angels in the Bible, 666; References in the New Tes.

tament, 668; Angels as guardian spirits, 669; They guard not only the Church, but

each one of us, 670; St. Augustine's view of them, 671 ; The rulings of God's mercy

to men, 672; The honor due the angels as practised in the Western Church, 673;

The angels in the domain of poetry, 674; But the pets take a great license, 675;

David the first of poets to commemorate them, 677; Blooming of the flower from

the root of Jesse, 678 ; Treatment of the subject by Dante, 679: The great event of

Bethlehem, 680; The record of Christ's life on earth, 681: Mary's life after her

Son's ascension, 682; Her glorious assumption, 681; The hierarchies and the

choirs of angels, 685 ; Father Faber on the Angels, 686 ; Festivals of the Angels,

687; The angels in sacred tradition, 689; How artists have painted them, 690.

« PreviousContinue »