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Mr. INSULL. I have not any desire to ask the committee—I have not any request to make of the committee with reference to any faction. What you have just read, if it was put into my mouth, is like lots of other things that are put into my mouth. · The CHAIRMAN. I want to be fair with you and I want the record to be fair. This article does not say that you said it, but it says that somebody said it, and I wanted to know whether you had said it.

Mr. INSULL. No, sir. I did not know it was even published.

The CHAIRMAN. It is all right for anybody to say it, but if you or anyone connected with this investigation thinks that the committee should examine additional witnesses, the committee desires to know that fact.

Mr. Insull, I think that that is all the committee desires to ask you. I am very sorry you are standing on your refusal.

Mr. INSULL. I am very sorry that I feel, as a matter of conscience, that I have got to. I would like to say to the committee that I have tried to supply them with all the information that could possibly be required of me, irrespective of my own personal convenience or irrespective of any effect on myself.

The CHAIRMAN. I am sorry the committee can not agree with you about that.

During your examination, and referring to your testimony which you had just given, and in which you have declined to tell what had been done with the $40,000, the chairman of the committee ventured to make this suggestion [reading]:

I think you had better go to these gentlemen whom you accommodated in this matter and get relieved from any obligation of honor and come and tell this committee. The committee does not want to proceed to extremities, but as this situation stands it will have to go as far as it can to get this evidence, and you understand this is not at all in the nature of a threat, because it is not 80 meant. It is in the nature of a kindly suggestion.

Have you, during the interval which has elapsed since your last examination, made any effort to get any of the persons to whom you gave money, whose names you have declined to disclose, to release you from what you are pleased to call an obligation of honor? Have you made any effort to do that?

Mr. INSULL. No, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Very well. I think that is all, gentlemen of the committee.

(Whereupon, at 11 o'clock a. m., the committee adjourned.)

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HEARINGS

BEFORE A

SPECIAL COMMITTEE INVESTIGATING EXPENDITURES IN SENATORIAL PRIMARY AND GENERAL ELECTIONS

UNITED STATES SENATE
SEVENTIETH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

PU'RSI'ANT TO

S. Res. 195

(69th Congress, 1st Session)
A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE PRESIDENT OF
THE SENATE TO APPOINT A SPECIAL COMMITTEE
TO MAKE INVESTIGATION INTO THE MEANS USED
TO INFLUENCE THE NOMINATION OF ANY PERSON
AS A CANDIDATE FOR MEMBERSHIP OF

THE I'NITED STATES SENATE

JANUARY 7, 1928

PART 7

Printed for the use of the Special Committee Investigating
Expenditures in Senatorial Primary and General Elections

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASIUNGTON

19:28

81.711

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ILLIAM H. KING, Tu

JAMES A. REED, Missouri, Chairman
CHARLES L. McNARY, Oregon.
GUY D. GOFF, West Virginia.
ROBERT M. LA FOLLETTE, JR., Wisconsin,

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SENATORIAL CAMPAIGN EXPENSES

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1928

UNITED STATES SENATE,
SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES

IN SENATORIAL ELECTIONS,

Washington, D. C. The special committee met pursuant to call at 10 o'clock a. m., in room 212, Senate Office Building, Senator James A. Reed presiding: Present, Senators Reed of Missouri (chairman), McNary, King, and La Follette.

The CHAIRMAN. The following two resolutions relating to this committee will be printed as a part of this hearing. (The resolutions referred to are as follows:)

(S. Res. 1, Seventieth Congress, first session] Whereas on the 17th day of May, 1926, the Senate passed a resolution creating a special committee to investigate and determine the improper use of money to promote the nomination or election of persons to the United States Senate, and the employment of certain other corrupt and unlawful means to secure such nomination or election.

Whereas said committee in the discharge of its duties notified Frank L. Smith, of Illinois, then a candidate for the United States Senate from that State, of its proceeding, and the said Frank L. Smith appeared in person and was permitted to counsel with and be represented by his attorney and agents.

Whereas the said committee has reported

That the evidence without substantial dispute shows that there was expended directly or indirectly for and on behalf of the candidacy of the said Frank L. Smith for the United States Senate the sum of $458,782; that all of the above sum except $171,500 was contributed directly to and received by the personal agent and representative of the said Frank L. Smith with his full knowledge and consent; and that of the total sum aforesaid there was contributed by officers of large public-service institutions doing business in the State of Illinois or by said institutions the sum of $203,000, a substantial part of which sum was contributed by men who are nonresidents of Illinois, but who were officers of Illinois publicservice corporations.

That at all of the times aforesaid the said Frank L. Smith was chairman of the Illinois Commerce Commission, and that said public-service corporations commonly and generally had business before said commission, and said commission was, among other things, empowered to regulate the rates, charges, and business of said corporations.

That by statutes of Illinois it is made a misdemeanor for any officer or agent of such public-service corporations to contribute any money to any member of said commission, or for any member of said commission to accept such moneys upon penalty of removal from office.

That said Smith has in no manner controverted the truth of the foregoing facts, although full and complete opportunity was given to him, not only to present evidenee but arguments in his behalf; and

Whereas the said official of said committee and the sworn evidence is now and for many months has been on file with the Senate, and all of the said facts appear without substantial dispute: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the acceptance and expenditure of the various sums of money aforesaid in behalf of the candidacy of the said Frank L. Smith is contrary to

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