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" The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ... - Page 122
1895
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The Christian Observer, Volume 13

Religion - 1815
...find this exemplified in the favourite poet of the Faery Queene, who tells us, that " the general end of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline;" but, we believe, scarcely any standard poem, whether of antiquity or of modern timf s, not excepting...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 36

England - 1834
...gentleman too — not merely of the king's but of God's creating — tells us that " the general end of all the Booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Perhaps — though we hope not — you may have read Lord Chesterfield. It was the " general end" of...
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The British Poets: Including Translations ...

British poets - Classical poetry - 1822
...misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading thereof, (being so by you commanded,) to discouer unto you the general intention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof I haue fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned....
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 36

Scotland - 1834
...gentleman too — not merely of the king's • but of God's creating — tells us that " the general end of all the Booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Perhaps — though we hope jiot — you may have read Lord Chesterfield. It was the " general end"...
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The New-York Review, Volume 4

1839
...immortal allegory, his high aim appears from the explanatory letter to Raleigh, that " the general end of all the Booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline,*' and thus he " moralized in song." In all his laments too — heart-broken as he probably was — is...
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The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 1

Edmund Spenser - 1839
...s. XII. In the letter to Sir Walter Raleigh, he informs us, "that the general end of all the hooks is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." This was a noble design; but whether, at this period, an uninterrupted series of knightly adventures...
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Lives of illustrious ... Irishmen, ed. by J. Wills, Volume 2, Part 2

Irishman - 1840
...zealous opinions and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading thereof, (being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention...fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes or by-accidents therein occasioned. The general end therefore of all the book, is to fashion a gentleman...
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The North American Review, Volume 50

Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, James Russell Lowell, Henry Cabot Lodge - American fiction - 1840
...Spenser's Poetical Works. [Jan. and on this model he fashioned his hero. He observes, that " the general end, therefore, of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in gentle and virtuous discipline." And again ; " I labor to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king,...
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The New-York Review, Volume 8

1841
...accomplishments, in elegance, and in manly virtues, from the reality. His object, as he has himself told us, was, to " fashion a gentleman, or noble person, in vertuous and gentle discipline;" and again, "Ilaoour to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave knight, perfected...
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The Faerie Queene

Edmund Spenser - English poetry - 1843 - 820 pages
...better light in reading thereof, (being so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general mtention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof I have...without expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman...
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