The Essentials of Argumentation

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D. C. Heath & Company, 1898 - Debates and debating - 412 pages
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Page 348 - Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
Page 342 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers ! hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may hear : believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe : censure me in your -wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Page 96 - Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead ? " But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen.
Page 228 - The question with me is not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not your interest to make them happy. It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do, but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do.
Page 347 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent; That day he overcame the Nervii : — Look ! In this place ran Cassius...
Page 261 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation.
Page 345 - For Brutus is an honorable man; So are they all, all honorable men — Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honorable man.
Page 25 - First, sir, permit me to observe that the use of force alone is but temporary. It may subdue for a moment ; but it does not remove the necessity of subduing again : and a nation is not governed, which is perpetually to be conquered.
Page 284 - The assassin enters, through the window already prepared, into an unoccupied apartment. With noiseless foot he paces the lonely hall, half lighted by the moon ; he winds up the ascent of the stairs, and reaches the door of the chamber.
Page 347 - Ant. You will compel me then to read the will ? Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar, And let me show you him that made the will. Shall I descend ? And will you give me leave ? Cit.

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