A Handy Book on Property Law: In a Series of Letters

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W. Blackwood, 1869 - Law - 315 pages

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Page 285 - Whosoever, being a director, manager, or public officer of any body corporate or public company shall make, circulate, or publish, or concur in making, circulating, or publishing, any written statement or account which he shall know to be false in any material particular...
Page 246 - ... is required for the execution of the will ; but the will, with such alteration as part thereof, shall be deemed to be duly executed if the signature of the testator and the subscription of the witnesses be made in the margin or on some other part of the will...
Page 241 - That no will shall be valid unless it shall be in writing and executed in manner herein-after mentioned ; (that is to say,) it shall be signed at the foot or end thereof by the testator, or by some other person in his presence and by his direction...
Page 252 - And be it further enacted, that no will or codicil or any part thereof, which shall be in any manner revoked, shall be revived otherwise than by the re-execution thereof, or by a codicil executed in manner hereinbefore required, and showing an intention to revive the same ; and when any will or codicil which shall be partly revoked, and afterwards wholly revoked, shall be revived, such revival shall not extend to so much thereof as shall have been revoked before the revocation of the whole thereof,...
Page 75 - God; but as nothing of this sort exists here, it is unnecessary to inquire what excuse would be sufficient. The general rule, as above stated, seems on principle just. The person whose grass or corn is eaten down by the escaping cattle of his...
Page 159 - Court shall have Power to direct in what Manner such Damages shall be paid or applied, and to direct that the whole or any Part thereof shall be settled for the Benefit of the Children (if any) of the Marriage, or as a Provision for the Maintenance of the Wife.
Page 76 - We think that the true rule of law is that the person who, for his own purposes, brings on his land and collects and keeps there anything likely to do mischief if it escapes, must keep it in at his peril ; and if he does not do so, is prima facie answerable for all the damage which is the natural consequence of its escape.
Page 36 - If a person having a right to an estate permit or encourage a purchaser to buy it of another, the purchaser shall hold it against the person who has the right.
Page 79 - No doubt, all the water falling from heaven and shed upon the surface of a hill, at the foot of which a brook runs, must, by the natural force of gravity, find its way to the bottom, and so into the brook ; but this does not prevent the owner of the land on which this water falls from dealing with it as he may please and appropriating it.
Page 71 - It was held by all the court, upon demurrer, that, if one erect a house, and build a conduit thereto, in another part of his land, and convey water by pipes to the house, and afterwards sell the house with the appurtenances, excepting the land, or sell the land to another, reserving to himself the house...

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