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160

Breeding

161

Cropping of the Ears

• 171

Firing

- 172

Rowels

• 174

Setons

• 175

Docking

· 176

Nicking

177

Castration

- 180

Shoeing

184

Vice

191

Stable Management

199

Various Colours of Horses 207

On Breeding

• 210

Colt-Breaking

• 215

The Turkish Horse • 219

Arabian do.

220

Egyptian do.

224

Persian do.

225

East Indian do.

• 226

Chinese do.

- 226

PAGE

Burman Horse

- 227

Tartar and Cossack do. . 227

African do.

228

American do.

• 229

Spanish do.

• 230

French do.

230

Italian do.

231

Flemish and German do. 231

Swedish and other do. 231

English do.

- 232

Mule, Ass, and Zebra 240

Condition

242

Morbid Condition

251

Getting a horse into Con-

dition

256

Directions to Travellers on

Horses

259

When a Shoe is lost

259

Injury of the Coffin-bone 259

Grease in the heels - 260

Strains and Bruises . 262

Saddle-galls

- 262

Coughs

. 262

Inflamed Eyes

- 263

Febrile Affections

• 263

Inflammation of the Spleen 265

Inflammation of the Liver 266

Weariness

- 267

Treatment of Chronic Cough 268

Inflammation of the Con-

junctiva

- 269

Strains in general

. 270

Training for the Course and

the Chase

288

Training Horses to Leap - 304

Riding a Race

- 306

Horse Racing

• 310

Walking

. 313

Trotting

- 315

The Foot

. 318

Excellence of English horses 320

On Unsoundness, and the

Purchase, and sale of do. 323

Inhuman Treatment of do. 326

The Stomach

551

Achievements of the horse 560

The varied form of the horse

according to the several

uses to which he is applied 581

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NEAT CATTLE.

POE

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- 391

. 398

SWINE,

The Wild Boar

The Sow

Measles

402

404

406

Sores and Cracked Ears 406

Sows and Boars for Breeding 407

Rearing and Fattening Pigs 408

THB IMPROVED

ART OF FARRIER Y

AND COMPLETE

FARMER'S GUIDE.

A BRIEF SURVEY OF THE RISE AND PRO.

GRESS OF THE VETERINARY ART.

The veterinary art appears to be of considerable antiquity. Among the Greeks, the philosophic Xenophon did not esteem the subiect upworthy of his attention. His work (De re Equestri), proves that the study of the horse was held to be of considerable importance by many great men even in those days. When the glory of Greece had declined, and imperial Rome had snatched the laurel of victory from her brow, we find the subject became more general ; and among the many authors treating on it figure the names of Varro and Virgil, who flourished in the age of Augustus, the golden period of Roman literature. A treatise by Columella, (entitled De re Rusticá), is particularly devoted to the subject: he wrote in the time of Claudius.

Nothing, however, of importance on the subject appeared till Vegetius, in the latter part of the third century, embodied in his writings all that could be culled from both Greek and Roman authors; and so ably had he treated on this head that for ages it was re

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