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in the bowels, that a horse will dung frequently, probably from pain, &c., but in a very small quantity at once. At the same time what he passes may appear somewhat soft or loose.

In such cases, the practitioners may perhaps be told by the byestanders, that clysters are unnecessary and superfluous ; this, however, ought not to prevent him from prescribing them; as in such cases, the flatulencies which occasion the disorder may be seated in the colon, where the excrements at the same time are extremely hardened ; and it frequently happens that after the second or third injection, they are dischargea in such a quantity, and in such a state, as to surprise those who were just before opposing and deriding the practice recommended. These prejudices every practitioner will have to combat, for he will frequently have as troublesome nurses to deal with as the physicians sometimes complain of, and who are no less ready with their impertinent advice.

ters, as the following is perhaps the best that can be adopted, viz., Epsom Salts

4 ounces. Thin Gruel

4 quarts. Mr. Clark of Edinburgh observes that there are many cases where clysters may be administered with great success, besides those already hinted at, as in inflammatory fevers, spasmodic constrictions, and colicky complaints in the bowels, in recent coughs, apoplexy, convulsions, paralytic complaints, swelling of the belly, whether from air or from hardened excrements.

They are required also in cases where horses are troubled with worms, as the ascarides, which lodge in the lower part of the intestines, or where bots are observed sticking in the anus, or voided in the dung; in very costive habits, before laxative or opening medicines are given by the mouth; in wounds which penetrate deep into the muscular or tendinous parts, or in the belly, &c.; in inflammation of the eyes, or when the head seems particularly affected; in inflammatory swellings on any part of the body. Clysters composed of mucilaginous substances, as starch, linseed, &c., are also of great benefit in cases of violent diarrhoea, whether proceeding from natural causes, or from too strong purging medicines given by ignorant farriers.

It ought always to be remembered, that clysters should be repeated frequently, till such time as the disorder for which they are given is either removed or greatly relieved. This injunction may be the more readily complied with, as the administering clysters to horses is not attended with either much trouble to the operator or disturbance to them

It frequently happens in colics and other complaints in the bowels, that a horse will dung frequently, probably from pain, &c., but in a very small quantity at

At the same time what he passes may appear somewhat soft or loose.

In such cases, the practitioners may perhaps be told by the byestanders, that clysters are unnecessary and superfluous; this, howerer, ought not to prevent him from prescribing them; as in such cases, the flatulencies which occasion the disorder may be seated in the colon, where the excrements at the same time are extremely hardened; and it frequently happens that after the second or third injection, they are discharged in such a quantity, and in such a state, as to surprise those who were just before opposing and deriding the practice recommended. These prejudices every practitioner will have to combat, for he will frequently have as troublesome nurses to deal with as the physicians sometimes complain of, and who are no less ready with their impertinent advice.

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