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MATERIA MEDICA.

A TABLE OF THE WEIGHTS AND MEA

SURES GENERALLY USED IN THE COMPOUNDING OF MEDICINES.

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For

Drop.
Grain.
Scruple.
Drachm.
Ounce.
Pound.

3 3 ib.

BLISTER.

ARE applications to the skin, which separate the cuticle in the form of vesicles containing a serous fluid. They excite increased action in the vessels of the skin, by means of which this fluid is thrown out.

The part or neighbouring parts are somewhat relieved by this discharge, but more by the inflam mation and pain which are produced, and which lessen the inflammation and pain previously existing in some contiguous part.

The substances used are various; the most important is the meloe cantharides or Spanish fly. Euphorbium is sometimes used. In common blistering for strains, &c., where the expense of cantharides is objected to, auxiliary vesicatories may be admitted, among which the tincture of croton is now used.

No. 1. BLISTER FOR GENERAL USE.

Powdered Cantharides

1 pound. Venice Turpentine

1 pound. Resin

1 pound. Palm Oil, or Lard

2 pounds. Melt the three latter articles slowly together, and when not too hot, gradually mix the cantharides or flies.

No. 2. A POWERFUL BLISTER.

Powdered Euphorbium
Oil of Vitriol
Spanish Flies

3 ounces. 2 drachms 1 pound.

Palm Oil, or Lard

3 pounds. Oil of Turpentine

8 ounces. Melt the resin with the lard or oil, after which add the turpentine.

No. 3. BLISTERS FOR SPRALNS, SPAVINS, SPLINTS, &c.

Of either of the former
Corrosive Sublimate

4 ounces.
2 scruples.

No. 4. LIQUID BLISTER, (STRONG.)

Spanish Flies

8 ounces. Oil of Turpentine

2 quarts. Olive Oil

1 quart. Steep the flies in the Turpentine three weeks; strain off, and add the olive oil.

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Thin Gruel or broth
Epsom, or common Salt
Or Yellow Soap

5 quarts. 6 ounces. 2 ounces.

No. 2. A CLYSTER FOR GRIPES.

Mash two

two ordinarily-sized onions; over which pourOil of Turpentine

2 ounces. Thin Gruel

4 quarts.

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Often used and found to render the most essential service, and to which frequent reference is made, is as follows:

Crude Sal-ammoniac

8 ounces, Vinegar

3 pints, mixed.

Other formulæ would extend beyond the limits of this work.

POULTICES.

1. A COMMON SOFTENING Poultice.

Bran, as much as is required; pour on it boiling water to form a thin paste ; add linseed-meal sufficient to make it adhesive. After this, stir in one or two ounces of sweet oil.

2. A COOLING PoultICE.

Bran, any quantity; pour on it sufficient quantity of cold Goulard water to form a poultice · when as it dries, moisten with more Goulard water.

3. A CLEANSING POULTICE, FOR Grease, &c.

Oatmeal

half a pint. Linseed Meal

half a pint Powdered Charcoal

half a pint Stale Beer grounds

half a pint. Or

Carrots scraped, sufficient to make a poultice. Or

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