The American Journal of Science

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J.D. & E.S. Dana, 1888 - Science
 

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Contents

Experiments with the Capillary Electrometer of Lipp
143
Period of the Rotation of the Sun as determined
151
Theory of the Bolometer by H F Reid
160
Are there DeepSea Medusa? by J W Fewkes
166
Obituary Ferdinand V Hayden
179
Number
197
Asa Gray bv J D Dana 181
204
On the socalled Northford Maine Meteorite
212
The Taconic System of Emmons and the use of
229
On the crystalline form of Polianite by Edward
243
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
248
Chemistry and Physics Stalagmometer and its use in quantitative analysis
249
Geology and MineralogyNote respecting the term Agnotozoie T C Chamber
258
Miscellaneous Scientific Intelligence Hanns Meteorological Atlas 263 Now
264
History of the changes in the Mt Loa Craters
282
The Electromotive Force of Magnetization
290
Notes on certain rare Copper Minerals from Utah
298
The Taconic System of Emmons and the use
307
Three Formations of the Middle Atlantic Slope
328
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
334
Geology and Natural History Distribution of strain in the Earths crust resulting
341
Miscellaneous Scientific Intelligence Beitrage zur Geophysik G Gerland
344
Three Formations of the Middle Atlantic Slope
367
On some peculiarly spotted Rocks from Pigeon
388
The Taconic System of Emmons and the use
394
Terminal Moraines in North Germany by Pro
401
Note on the Viscosity of Gases at High Tempera
407
Chemical Physical and Stratigraphical
418
Botany and ZoologyRecent contributions to our knowledge of the vegetable cell
424
Note on EarthquakeIntensity in San Fran
427
XXXVIIIThe Gabbros and Dioritea of the Coitlamlt
438
Mode of Reading Mirror Galvanometers etc by
50
Some Localities of PostTertiary and Tertiary Fossils
56
Action of Hydrogen sulphide on Arsenic
63
Fauna and Flora of the Trias of New Jersey and the Connecticut Valley
71
Botany and ZoologyRecent advance in Vegotable Histology A Dumont 76
77
Chemistry and Physics Decomposition of the Hydrides of the Halogens by Light
79
Geobjgij and Natural listory Communication by Raphael Iurnpelly 79 Geo
87
Cambrian Fossils from Mount Stephens North
162
XVILHistory of Changes in the Mt Loa Craters
167
On the formation of the deposits of Oxides
175
On the Origin of Primary Quartz in Basalt by
208
Mineralogical Notes by Geo F Kunz 222
222
A young Tortoise Chrysemya picta with
227
Analysis of a Soil from Washington Territory
236
Rosetown Extension of the Cortlandt Series by
247
The ContactMetamorphism produced in the
254
The Sedentary Habits of Platyceras by C
269
Two new masses of Meteoric Iron by G F Kunz
275
The Compression of Powdered Solids by
286
Miscellaneous Scientific Intelligence American Association for the Advancement
303
The Invisible Solar and Lunar Spectrum
397
A brief history of Taconic ideas by J D Dana 410
410
ObituaryOscar Harger 425 JullsEmile Planchon 420
420
Certain Generic Electrical Relations of the Alloys
427
Puget Group of Washington Territory by C
443
Sulphantimonites from Colorado by L G Eakins 450
450
Fauna of the Great Smoky Mountains by C
458
SCIENTIFIC INTELLIGENCE
465
Geology and Mineralogy International Congress of Geology 468 American
472
Index to Volume XXXVI 479
479

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Page 426 - Microseismic shock: recorded by a single seismograph or by seismographs of the same model, but not by several seismographs of different kinds; the shock felt by an experienced observer.
Page 75 - According to the terms of the trust, a bronze medal, and the balance of the interest arising from the fund, are to be awarded annually for the best publication, exploration, discovery, or research in the sciences of geology and paleontology, or in such particular branches thereof as may be designated.
Page 180 - This school, of high repute, was established at that place in 1812 as the College of Physicians and Surgeons of the Western District of New York.
Page 194 - But even my friend's rare dialectic skill and copiousness of apt illustration could not drive me from my agnostic position.
Page 27 - ... (1) a rising in level of the liquid lavas and of the bottom of the crater ; (2) a discharge of the accumulated lavas down to some level in the conduit determined by the outbreak ; (3) a down-plunge of more or less of the floor of the region undermined by the discharge.
Page 197 - I declare that you know niy book as well as I do myself, aud bring to the question new lines of illustration and argument in a manner which excites my astonishment and almost my envy." "As Hooker lately said in a note to me, you are, more than any one else, the thorough master of the subject.
Page 59 - The different groupings shade off' so imperceptibly the one into the other that it is impossible to erect a definite boundary between any two adjacent bodies and to say that the body on this side of the line is an element, while the one on the other side is non-elementary, or merely something which simulates or approximates to an element.
Page 163 - But to the westward it has dry declivities, which are comparatively even at base, with little running water. A direct connection is thus evinced between a windward exposure, and the existence of valleys ; and we observe also that the time since volcanic action ceased is approximately or relatively indicated, for it has been long enough for a valley to have advanced only part way to the summit.
Page 123 - ... were located; and across the necks of the inter-estuarine peninsulas the pioneer routes of travel were extended from settlement to settlement until the entire Atlantic slope was traversed by a grand social and commercial artery stretching from New England to the Gulf States. As the population grew and spread, the settlements, villages, and towns along...
Page 192 - ... of our strictly alpine species common to Europe — all but one of them arctic in the Old World — are not known to cross the arctic circle on this continent. This, however, might perhaps have been expected, as it seems almost certain that the interchange of alpine species between us and Europe must have taken place in the direction of Newfoundland, Labrador, and Greenland rather than through the polar regions.

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