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"O God, thou art my God; early will I seek thee: my soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee in a dry and thirsty land, where no water is ; to see thy power and thy glory, so as I have seen thee in the sanctuary.”—Psalm lxiii. 1, 2.

The passage, beloved friends, brings us immediately to God. "O God," says the Psalmist, “ thou art my God.” And what I want at the very outset this morning is, that we should know and feel that God is everything to us; that unless we have God we have nothing; but having God, we have everything; we have an unchanging portion. And what I want further is, that the sinner be led to say, with this word, “O God, thou art my God.” For you know God is the God of the sinner; and the sinner believing, believes God, and hath God for his salvation, hath God for his portion. So that if you have never been enabled to say before this morning, “ O God, thou art my God,” God, by His Holy Spirit, may give you, in the calm spirit of faith and of assurance, this very day to say, “My God;" and that you may add, “ early will I seek thee" when I awake I am still with God God in me—God with me-God saying unto me, “I will never leave thee nor forsake thee.

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And the word farther goes on to say, “My soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee, in a dry and thirsty land, where no water is.” That is to say, beloved hearers, God does not in any wise preclude the glorious fact that the more we have of Him, the more we may have; for having tasted what God is, having stood by the shining shore, we want the inexhaustible fulness, we thirst for the ocean, we long for Himself :“My soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee in a dry and thirsty land, where no water is.”

And the word still farther goes on to say, thy power and thy glory, so as I have seen thee in the sanctuary.” Oh! beloved, the very thing we want to see here to-dayHis power and His glory; and, believe

me, God will give us to see it! And the measure of what we want is this—the Psalmist gives it, but it is very low_"

As we have seen it;" “ To see thy power and thy glory so as we have seen thee." But it will be higher some of these days. We are about to see it in a way the heart can never conceive, for it is incomprehensible—it is infinite and eternal; but meanwhile we say,

“ O God! we shall be satisfied if Thou givest us to see it even as we have seen it.” One is reminded here of dear old Jacob, where he speaks of the God of Bethel—the God who appeared to him at Bethel, and who comforted him in his lone pilgrimage at Bethel. Oh! I delight to think of it, that I—that we can look to God here, and say, O God of these times now passing over us, let us again see the glory we have seen in our Bethel! O thou God of 57 in the transatlantic world, and of '59 through the five Counties of Ulster! O God of Leamington, of Freemasons' Hall, and of Brighton! God of Metropolitan Hall, of Northumberland Avenue, and the Kingstown Waters! We do want to see Thee as we HAVE seen Thee. We want “ to see thy power and thy glory," as

we

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