The parlour window; or, Anecdotes, original remarks on books, etc

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Page 147 - For loyalty is still the same Whether it win or lose the game ; True as the dial to the sun, Although it be not shin'd upon.
Page 132 - Now morn, her rosy steps in th' eastern clime Advancing, sow'd the earth with orient pearl, When Adam...
Page 149 - Cromwell, Cromwell, Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.
Page 148 - He that complies against his will, Is of his own opinion still...
Page 165 - But to hear the nightingale and other birds, and here fiddles, and there a harp, and here a Jew's trump, and here laughing, and there fine people walking, is mighty divertising.
Page 64 - Oh for a tongue to curse the slave, Whose treason, like a deadly blight, Comes o'er the councils of the brave, And blasts them in their hour of might!
Page 158 - I did never see before) ; and though she be not very charming, yet she hath a good, modest, and innocent look which is pleasing. Here I also saw Madam Castlemaine, and, which pleased me most, Mr. Crofts...
Page 158 - I went upon the river : it raining hard upon the water, I put ashore and sheltered myself, while the King came by in his barge, going down towards the Downs to meet the Queen ; the Duke being gone yesterday. But methought it lessened my esteem of a king, that he should not be able to command the rain.
Page 163 - I home by coach, but met not one bonfire through the whole town in going round by the wall, which is strange, and speaks the melancholy disposition of the city at present, while never more was said of, and feared of, and done against the Papists than just at this time. Home, and there find my wife and her people at cards, and I to my chamber, and there late, and so to supper and to bed.
Page 170 - W. Coventry, that he had sat twenty-six years in Parliament and never heard such a speech there before : for which the Lord God make me thankful! and that I may make use of it not to pride and vain-glory, but that, now I have this esteem, I may do nothing that may lessen it!

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