LIFE OF JOSEPH BRANT-THAYENDANEGEA: INLCUDING THE BORDER WARS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, AND SKETCHES OF THE INDIAN CAMPAIGNS OF GENERALS HAMAR, ST. CLAIR, AND WAYNE AND OTHER MATTERS CONNECTED WITH THE INDIAN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITIAN, FROM THE PEACE OF 1793 TO THE INDIAN PEACE OF 1725

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Page 174 - You can form no idea of the perplexity of my situation. No man, I believe, ever had a greater choice of difficulties, and less means to extricate himself from them. However, under a full persuasion .of the justice of our cause, I cannot entertain an idea, that it will finally sink, though it may remain for some time under a cloud.
Page 56 - I am afraid my uncle will think himself justified by them on this occasion, when he asserts, that it is one of the most difficult things in the world to put a woman right, when she sets out wrong.
Page 46 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 92 - Creator hath graciously bestowed upon us, the arms we have been compelled by our enemies to assume, we will, in defiance of every hazard, with unabating firmness and perseverance, employ for the preservation of our liberties; being with one mind resolved to die freemen rather than to live slaves.
Page 201 - The evacuation of Ticonderoga and Mount Independence is an event of chagrin and surprise not apprehended, nor within the compass of my reasoning This stroke is severe indeed, and has distressed us much.
Page 279 - He did more," said Burgoyne, in a speech before the House of Commons, " he sent an aide-de-camp to conduct me to Albany ; in order, as he expressed it, to procure better quarters than a stranger might be able to find. That gentleman conducted me to a very elegant house, and, to my great surprise, presented me to Mrs. Schuyler and her family. In that house I remained during my whole stay in Albany, with a table of more than twenty covers for me and my friends, and every other demonstration of hospitality.
Page 203 - Independence is an event of chagrin and surprise not apprehended, nor within the compass of my reasoning. * * * This stroke is severe indeed, and has distressed us much. But, notwithstanding things at present have a dark and gloomy aspect, I hope a spirited opposition will check the progress of General Burgoyne's army...
Page 46 - During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites, that my countrymen pointed, as they passed, and said, < Logan is the friend of the white men.
Page 192 - My son, the Great Spirit has seen fit that we should die together, and has sent you to that end. It is his will, and let us submit.
Page 380 - he is a brave man, and I would have given more to take him than any other man in Cherry Valley ; but I would not have hurt a hair of his head.

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