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self. Things are with one another coessential or consubstantial, not properties, nor abstract notions.

As to my rendering John iv. 24. I have the same right to render avīza Spirit, (not a Spirit,) as our translators had to render treuuati, in the same verse, Spirit, not a Spirit. But that by the way only, having little relation to our present dispute.

As to the preposition asd, neither you nor Mr. Norris has given any instance of its ever being used in the exemplary sense. The rest is of no moment.

Thus, Sir, I have, I think, considered every exception in your letter that appears to have any weight. As you are pleased to apply to me under the character of a Ductor Dubitantium, so I have endeavoured to answer every the least scruple, that so you may the more readily come into those reasons which I before offered, and which return now upon you in their full force. I beg leave to assure you, that I offer you nothing but what appears to me plain good sense, and sound reason, and such as has weight with myself as much as I desire it may have with you. I sincerely wish you a right judgment in all things, and remain,

Your Friend and Servant,

DAN. WATERLAND.

Magd. Coll. Nov. 13, 1720.

LETTER V. SIR, I GAVE you time to consider upon what I had before offered, that you might at length give up what you could no longer maintain. It was with me a preliminary article, that we should not run from point to point, to make a rambling and fruitless dispute of it; without settling and clearing any thing. I will not undertake to go through the obscurer parts of the controversy with you, while I find you so unwilling to apprehend plain things. It would be endless for me to explain my meaning every time you mistake it : for every explanation will still want a farther explanation, and so on ad infinitum. I have neither leisure nor inclination to proceed in this way; nor do I see to what purpose it is. I have showed my willingness, upon your own earnest request, to serve you in this controversy ; but despair of any success in it. The civilest way now is, to break off a correspondence which can serve to no good end. You are well pleased with your own opinions, and I as well satisfied with mine. Which of us has the most reason, we shall both know another day.

I am,

SIR,
Your Friend and Servant,

DAN. WATERLAND.

Magd. Coll. Dec. 25, 1720.

A

DISSERTATION

UPON THE

ARGUMENT A PRIORI

For proving the Existence of a

FIRST CAUSE:

IN A LETTER TO MR. LAW.

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