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The work as now presented is more voluminous than originally intended, but we believe it is exceedingly rich in such matter as the historian of the future will be rejoiced to find; and, however large its dimensions, we are convinced there are yet stores of untouched material sufficient for a volume equally large. We have aimed to rescue the heroic deeds of the Thirty-Sixth, as well as the names of the actors from oblivion, and to erect a monument that would perpetuate to all time the brilliant achievements of a regiment which, in disinterested patriotism, deeds of daring and distinguished services, is second to none.

The statistics will bear us out in the statement that in proportion to their numbers no other regiment in all the armies of the United States lost so many killed in battle, or so few from disease, as the Thirty-Sixth Illinois.

With these general remarks, relative to the construction and object of the work, we submit it to a generous, reading public, making no claim to literary skill or perfection, and yet hoping that the perusal of its pages will prove a source of pleasure and profit to many. If, through it, we have assisted in the growth of true patriotism, inculcated a love of country, or refreshed the laurels of both the living or the dead, we are content.

THE AUTHORS. YORKVILLE, ILL, July 20th, 1876.

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PORTRAITS.
Col. N. Greusel,.
Major Gen. S. R. Curtis,.
Major Gen. Franz Sigel..
Rev. Wm. M. Haigh,...
Gen. Phil. H. Sheridan, --.
Col, Silas Miller,..
Gen. Wm. H. Lytle,.
Lieut. Col. Porter C. Olson,
Major Gen. H. Thomas,.
Major S. B. Sherer,..

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HISTORY

OF THE

THIRTY-SIXTH ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS.

CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTORY.

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WENTY YEARS of ceaseless agitation of the

“Slavery Question," engendered sectional animosities, which, intensified with each succeeding political campaign, and each fresh triumph of the anti-slavery party, eventually culmin

ated in the election of Abraham Lincoln as Chief Magistrate of the Republic. This event served to embitter the pro-slavery faction beyond the bounds of reason, and was used by them as a pretext for breaking into pieces the government of which they for a long series of years had held absolute control. The result of that election was hardly known, when South Carolina fulminated her Ordinance of Secession amidst a wild storm of enthusiasm which swept over the whole South. State after State seceded and rapidly wheeled into line with Carolina. For months before the inauguration of the

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