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FIRST LIEUTENANCY OF COMPANY I.

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To give Merrill a place among the officers, a vacancy was necessary, and as in the recruiting of the 36th the offices were most eagerly sought after and soonest filled, unfortunately such vacancy did not exist. The Surgeon was called upon to decide the physical qualifications of candidates for official honors. Walker was alone found wanting, and thereupon rejected, when Merrill at once succeeded to the position. This arrangement was not at all satisfactory to Walker, who strenuously objected to being so summarily disposed of; for, however much he delighted in auctioneering off the goods, chattels and wares of others, the rule when applied to himself was not so delightful, and he entered his protest against such a going-going-gone procedure. Walker hastened to Chicago and was examined by other medical magnates, who pronounced him physically sound, or at least sound enough for the performance of military duty.

In the meantime Major Brackett had mustered the whole Regiment and accepted it for service, including 0. B. Merrill as Lieutenant of Co. I., and on Walker's return to camp, backed by his medical certificate, he found Lieut. Merrill fully installed and in the performance of the duties of the much coveted position. Walker claimed his position of 1st Lieutenant and demanded his reinstatement and recognition as such. The Colonel was in a towering rage, and ordered Walker to leave the camp instantly, and set about measures to enforce the order; whereupon Walker, thinking discretion the better part of valor, went. We would gladly strike this page from our story, but, as an impartial historian, there is no other resource than to treat the good and bad alike. This is our apology for giving details of an occurence which, more than all other causes combined, carried with it the seeds of acrimony and dissension.

It cannot be denied that for one reason or another a great many poor sticks ” managed at the outset to get into positions, for which they were in a greater or less degree unfitted. Many a Company, and Regiment even, made up of most excellent material, have been rendered comparatively useless by having at its head an inefficient leader. If there was one lesson well learned during the first years of the war, it was the absolute necessity of having men for officers ! Men, in the broad sense of the term, who had some respect for themselves as well as for others. Men to stand firm, self-possessed, elevated and strengthened by a high sense of honor, of patriotic duty to their country, to their subordinates, and to the cause in which they were engaged. Imagine a whining incapable, leading a body of men upon a desperate bayonet charge!

The very first element of success and of discipline is the respect of men for their officers, and only true men can thus command their respect. Let such a one be found and the rest becomes easy, whether he is wanted for a General, a Colonel or a Lieutenant. The 13th Regiment, or even West Point with all its training in camp or field, could not manufacture first-rate officers if the indispensible ingredients of self-respect, honor, temperance, manliness and reserved force of character are lacking. When war and battles are resorted to in the settlement of difficulties, it should be no child's play, but the desperate exercise of all the higher qualities of manhood; for unless troops are under the control of true men, defeat is inevitable.

On the 12th of September Col. Brackett appeared, and in his official capacity as United States Mustering Officer, inspected and mustered the Regiment as a whole. Each Company in single file was slowly marched between a Board of Surgeons, and if a limp was detected or a man wore a cadaverous cast of

A FEW REFUSE TO BE SWORN.

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countenance, he was requested to stand aside and afterwards subjected to an ante mortem Coroner's inquest, called Medical Examination. A few were rejected, and, notwithstanding their protestations of general good health and appeals to remain, they were obliged to take up their traps and walk. The examination over, the oath was administered to the whole Regiment, which was for the first time designated the THIRTY-SIXTH, and as such was booked for three years' service in the employ of that stupendous individual, Uncle Sam.

A few refused to be sworn in and comply with the conditions attached to the service; whereupon Col. Joslyn jerked them out of the ranks, and presenting each a note of hand with the toe of his boot, sent them howling beyond the confines of campa mode of mustering out not laid down in the books, and calculated to awaken a remembrance of so lively an event to the latest hours of life. Among these were two Germans from Co. E., whose courage oozing out at this supreme moment, they refused to take the prescribed oath. They were followed a half mile from camp by half a hundred madly excited men and remorselessly kicked and hustled about, and as a parting token of remembrance a horse whip was unmercifully administered to their backs. Their piteous cries for mercy awakened but little sympathy from their late and now infuriated comrades.

CHAPTER III.

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ROSTER OF THE REGIMENT.

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OLLOWING is the Roster of the 36th Regi

ment, on its final muster and acceptance into the service of the United States, and at the period of its departure from Camp Hammond to Missouri.

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NICHOLAS GREUSEL, EDWARD S. JOSLYN, ALONZO H. BARRY, GEORGE A. WILLIS, Isaac N. Buck, DELOS W. Young, SIDNEY W. HAWLEY, JETHRO A. HATCH, GEORGE G. Lyon,

Colonel.
Lieut. Colonel.

Major.

Adjutant.
Quartermaster.

Surgeon.
1st Assistant Surgeon.
2d Assistant Surgeon.

Chaplain.

COMPANY A.
MELVIN B. BALDWIN, Captain.
EDWARD S. CHAPPEL, 1st Lieutenant.
WILLIAM S. SMITH, 2d Lieutenant.

ROSTER OF THE REGIMENT.

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ENLISTED MEN, COMPANY A.
George D. Sherman, 1st Sergeant. Charles A. Holsie.
Franklin J. Thwing, Sergeant.

James Halberton.
Alexander C. Lynd, Sergeant.

David F. Jayne. Sanford H. Wakeman, Sergeant.

George M. Johnson. Alexander Robinson, Sergeant.

Leverett M. Kelley. Walter J. Ordway, Corporal.

Frederick Krahan. Leslie P. Ticknor, Corporal.

Addison A Keyes. John W. Aldrich, Corporal.

George M. Lake. Benj. D. C. Roland, Corporal.

James H. Moore. Leroy Salisbury, Corporal.

Isaac N. Miner. William H Mitchell, Corporal.

Leonard W. Nann. John S. Long, Corporal.

Edward Nute. Frank B. Perkins, Corporal.

John O'Connell. Charles B. Styles, Musician.

Chandler Preston. Brayman Loveless, Musician.

Edmund H. Robinson Albert Andrews.

Charles B. Rapp. Bernan V. Adams.

William F. Sylla. Charles A. Brown.

Michael Seisloff, Daniel W. Brown.

George H. Kimball. Patrick Brannon.

Romane Kilburn. Fred. H. Birmaster.

George H. Knowles. Christopher P. Baker.

Peter Little. John B. Burr.

Alex Manahan. Elijah Buck.

Tobias Miller. Leman Bartholomew.

Lewis F. Miller. John Bluckman.

Dorus Murus. Buel M. Chapman.

Fenelon J. Nicholas. Charles G. Cox.

Charles Olesyeski Henry Clayson.

George L. Peeler. Alexander Chambers.

Augustus Ritze. Hugh Duffee.

Timothy Ring. Cyrus F. Dean.

Fred. A Raymond. William Dade.

Duportal Sampson. Freeman S. Dunkler.

Tolmus Stanton. Jeptha C. Dennison.

Adelbert Shaw. Thomas Fenner.

Lewis H. Severine. John Flood.

Charles L. Themer. John Faulkner.

Milton S. Townsend. Henry Ford.

James M. Vining. Charles H. Gales.

John A. White. Patrick Gibbons.

Homer H. Wilcox. Moses T. Gibbs.

Joseph N. Yerkers.

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