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The owlet screams ill-boding sounds,
The spirit walks unholy rounds;
The wizard's hour eclipsing rolls;
The shades of hell usurp the poles ;
The moon retires; the heaven departs.
From opening earth a spectre starts :
My spirit dies-Away my fears,
My love, my life, my lord appears !

Hen. I come, I come, my love! my life!
And nature's dearest name, my wife!
Long have I lov'd thee; long have sought;
And dangers brav'd, and battles fought;
In this embrace our evils end;
From this our better days ascend;
The year of suffering now is o'er,
At last we meet to part no more!

My lovely bride ! my consort, come!
The rapid chariot rolls thee home.

Har. I fear to goI dare not stay. Look back I dare not look that way.

Hen. No evil ever shall betide
My love, while I am at her side.
Lo! thy protector and thy friend,
The arms that fold thee will defend,

Har. Still beats my bosom with alarms: I tremble while I'm in thy arms !

What will impassion'd lovers do?
What have I done-to follow you?
I leave a father torn with fears;
I leave a mother bath'd in tears;
A brother, girding on his sword,
Against my life, against my lord.

Now, without father, mother, friend,
On thee my future days depend;
Wilt thou, for ever true to love,
A father, mother, brother prove?
O Henry!-to thy arms I fall,
My friend! my husband! and my all!
Alas! what hazards may I run?
Shouldst thou forsake me I'm undone.

Hen. My Harriet, dissipate thy fears, And let a husband wipe thy tears; For ever join'd our fates combine, And I am yours, and you are mine. The fires the firmament that rend, On this devoted head descend, If e'er in thought from thee I rove, Or love thee less than now I love!

Although our fathers have been foes,
From hatred stronger, love arose;
From adverse briars that threat'ning stood,
And threw a horror o'er the wood,

Two lovely roses met on high,
Transplanted to a better sky;
And, grafted in one stock, they grow,
In union spring, in beauty blow.

Har. My heart believes my love; but still My boding mind presages ill: For luckless ever was our love, Dark as the sky that hung above. While we embraced, we shook with fears, And with our kisses mingled tears; We met with murmurs and with sighs, And parted still with watery eyes.

An unforeseen and fatal hand
Cross'd all the measures love had plann’d;
Intrusion marr'd the tender hour,
A demon started in the bower;
If, like the past, the future run,
And my dark day is but begun,
What clouds may hang above my head?
What tears may I have yet to shed ?

Hen. O do not wound that gentle breast, Nor sink, with fancied ills opprest; For softness, sweetness, all, thou art, And love is virtue in thy heart. 'That bosom ne'er shall heave again But to the poet's tender strain;

And never more these

eyes

o'erflow But for a hapless lover's woe.

Long on the ocean tempest-tost,
At last we gain the happy coast;
And safe recount upon the shore
Our sufferings past, and dangers o'er :
Past scenes; the woes we wept erewhile
Will make our future minutes smile:
When sudden joy from sorrow springs,
How the heart thrills through all its strings !

Har. My father's castle springs to sight;
Ye towers that gave me to the light!
O hills! O vales! where I have play'd;
Ye woods, that wrap me in your shade!
O scenes I've often wander'd o'er !
O scenes I shall behold no more!
I take a long, last, lingering view:
Adieu ! my native land, adieu!

O father, mother, brother dear!
O names still utter'd with a tear!
Upon whose knees I've sat and smii'd,
Whose griefs my blandishments beguild;
Whom I forsake in sorrows old,
Whom I shall never more behold!
Farewell, my friends, a long farewell,
Till time shall toll the funeral knell.

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Hen. Thy friends, thy father's house resign; My friends, my house, my all is thine, Awake, arise, my wedded wife, To higher thoughts, and happier life! For thee the marriage feast is spread, For thee the virgins deck the bed ; The star of Venus shines above, And all thy future life is love.

They rise, the dear domestic hours !
The May of love unfolds her flow'rs;
Youth, beauty, pleasure spread the feast,
And friendship sits a constant guest;
In cheerful peace the morn ascends,
In wine and love the evening ends;
At distance grandeur sheds a ray,
To gild the evening of our day.

Connubial love has dearer names,
And finer ties, and sweeter claims,
Than e'er unwedded hearts can feel,

Than wedded hearts can e'er reveal; :- Pure as the charities above,

Rise the sweet sympathies of love;
And closer cords than those of life
Unite the husband to the wife.

Like cherubs new come from the skies,
Henrys and Harriets round us rise ;

VOL. VI.

H

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