Our Brother in Black: His Freedom and His Future

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Phillips & Hunt, 1881 - African Americans - 252 pages
 

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A re-print of the author's 1889 revision of the 1881 original. The author engages in a social analysis of the plight of African-Americans of 1881, not long after emancipation and before the prevalence ... Read full review

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Page 44 - Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun...
Page 68 - That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any state or designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever, free...
Page 195 - And I will come near to you to judgment; And I will be a swift witness Against the sorcerers, and against the adulterers, and against false swearers, And against those that oppress the hireling in his wages, The widow, and the fatherless, And that turn aside the stranger from his right, and fear not me, Saith the Lord of hosts.
Page 61 - If there be in it any inferences which I may believe to be falsely drawn, I do not, now and here, argue against them. If there be perceptible in it an impatient and dictatorial tone, I waive it in deference to an old friend, whose heart I have always supposed to be right. As to the policy I "seem to be pursuing," as you say, I have not meant to leave any one in doubt.
Page 195 - At his day thou shalt give him his hire, neither shall the sun go down upon it; for he is poor, and setteth his heart upon it: lest he cry against thee unto the LORD, and it be sin unto thee.
Page 196 - Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth : and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth.
Page 28 - But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive.
Page 134 - You know I am incapable of the weakness of jealousy, Peter; but what I have seen with my own eyes, and heard with my own ears, in this disguise, must command credit, however reluctantly granted.
Page 63 - What good would a proclamation of emancipation from me do, especially as we are now situated? I do not want to issue a document that the whole world will see must necessarily be inoperative, like the Pope's bull against the comet!
Page 195 - Woe unto him that buildeth his house by unrighteousness, and his chambers by wrong ; that useth his neighbour's service without wages, and giveth him not for his work...

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