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The precincts of Beetown, Patch Grove, Cassville, Millville, and Lancaster, in the county of Grant, shall constitute an assembly district.

The county of Green shall constitute an assewably district.

The precincts of Dallas, Peddler's Creek, Mineral Point, and Yellow Sione, in the county of Iowa, shall constitute an assembly district.

The precincts of Franklin, Dodgeville, Porter's Grove, Arena, and Percussion, in the county of Iowa, and the county of Richland, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Watertown, Aztalan, and Waterloo, in the county of Jefferson, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Ixonia, Concord, Sullivan, Hebron, Cold Spring, and Palmyra, in the county of Jefferson, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Lake Mills, Oakland, Koskonong, Farmington, and Jefferson, in the county of Jefferson, shall constitute an assembly district.

The precincts of Benton, Elk Grove, Belmont, Willow Springs, Prairie, and that part of Shullsburgh precinct north of town one, in the county of La Fay. ette, shall constitute an assembly district.

The precincts of Wiota, Wayne, Gratiot, White Oak Springs, Fever River, and that part of Shullsburgh precinct south of town two, in the county of La Fayette, shall constitute an assembly district.

The county of Marquette shall constitute an assembly district.
The first ward of the city of Milwaủkee, shall constitute an assembly district.
The second ward of the city of Milwaukee, shall constitute an assembly district.
The third ward of the city of Milwaukee, shall constitute an assembly district.

The fourth and fifth wards of the city of Milwaukee, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Franklin, and Oak Creek, in the county of Milwaukee, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Greenfield, and Lake, in the county of Milwaukee, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Granville, Wauwatosa, and Milwaukee, in the county of Milwaukee, shall constitute an assembly distriet.

The county of Portage shall constitute an assembly district.
The town of Racine, in the county of Racine, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Norway, Raymond, Caledonia, and Mount Pleasant, in the county of Racine, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Rochester, Burlington, and Yorkville, in the county of Racine, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Southport, Pike, and Pleasant Prairie, in the county of Racine, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Paris, Bristol, Brighton, Salem, and Wheatland, in the county of Racine, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Janesville, and Bradford, in the county of Rock, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Beloit, Turtle, and Clinton, in the county of Rock, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Magnolia, Union, Porter, and Fulton, in the county of Rock, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Milton, Lima, and Johnstown, in the county of Rock, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Newark, Rock, Avon, Spring Valley, and Centre, in the county of Rock, shall constitute an assembly district: Provided, That if the legislature shall divide the town of Centre, they may attach such part of it to the district lying next north, as they may deem expedient.

The county of Sauk shall constitute an assembly district.

Precincts numbered one, three, and seven, in the county of Sheboygan, shall constitute an assembly district.

Precincts numbered two, four, five, and six, in the county of Sheboygan, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Troy, East Troy, and Spring Prairie, in the county of Walworth, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Whitewater, Richmond, and Lagrange, in the county of Walworth, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Geneva, Hudson, and Bloomfield, in the county of Walworth, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Darien, Sharon, Walworth, and Lynn, in the county of Walworth, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Delavan, Sugar Creek, La Fayette, and Elkhorn, in the county of Walworth, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Lisbon, Menomonee, and Brookfield, in the county of Waukesha, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Warren, Oconomewoc, Summit, and Ottowa, in the county of Waukesha, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Delafield, Genesee, and Pewaukee, in the county of Waukesha, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Waukesha and New Berlin, in the county of Waukesha, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Eagle, Mukwanego, Vernon, and Muskego, in the county of Waukesha, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Port Washington, Fredonia, and Clarence, in the county of Washington, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Grafton and Jackson, in the county of Washington, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Mequon and Germantown, in the county of Washington, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Polk, Richfield, and Erin, in the county of Washington, shall constitute an assembly district.

The towns of Hartford, Addison, West Bend, and North Bend, in the county of Wa-hington, shall constitute an assembly district.

The county of Winnebago shall constitute an assembly district.

The foregoing districts are subject, however, so far to be altered that when any new town shall be organized, it may be added to either of the adjoining assembly districts.

13. Such parts of the common law as are now in force in the territory of Wisconsin, not inconsistent with this constitution, shall be and continue part of the law of this state, until altered or suspended by the legislature.

14. The senators first elected in the even nnmbered senate districts, the governor, lieutenant-governor, and other state officers first elected under this constitution, shall enter upon the duties of their respective offices on the first Monday of June next, and shall continue in office for one year from the first Monday of January next. The senators first elected in the odd numbered senate districts, and the members of the assembly first elected, shall enter upon their duties respectively on the first Monday of June next, and shall continue in office until the first Monday in January next.

15. The oath of office may be administered by any judge or justice of the peace, until the legislature shall otherwise direct.

RESOLUTIONS.

Resolved, That the congress of the United States be and is hereby requested, upon the application of Wisconsin for admission into the Union, so to alter the provisions of an act of congress entitled “an act to grant a quantity of land to the territory of Wisconsin for the purpose of aiding in opening a canal to connect the waters of lake Michigan with those of Rock river," approved June eighteenth,

eighteen hundred and thirty-eight; and so to alter the terms and conditions of the grant made therein, that the odd numbered sections thereby granted and remaining unsold, may be held and disposed of by the state of Wisconsin, as part of the five hundred thousand acres of land to which said state is entitled by the provisions of an act of congress, entitled “ an act to appropriate the proceeds of the sales of the public lands, and to grant pre-emption rights,” approved the fourth day of September, eighteen hundred and forty-one; and further, that the even numbered sections reserved by congress may be offered for sale by the United States for the same minimum price, and subject to the same rights of pre-emption as other public lands of the United States.

Resolved, That congress be further requested to pass an act whereby the excess price over and above one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, which may have been paid by the purchasers of said even numbered sections which shall have been sold by the United States, be refunded to the present owners thereof, or they be allowed to enter any of the public lands of the United States, to an amount equal in value to the excess so paid.

Resolved, That in case the odd numbered sections shall be ceded to the state as aforesaid, the same shall be sold by the state in the same manner as other school lands: Provided, That the same rights of pre-emption as are now granted by the laws of the United States, shall be secured to persons who may be actually settled upon such lands at the time of the adoption of this constitution: and provided further, That the excess price over and above one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre, absolutely or conditionally contracted to be paid by the purchasers of any part of said sections which shall have been sold by the territory of Wisconsin, shall be remitted to such purchasers, their representatives, or assigns.

Resolved, That congress be requested, upon the plication of Wisconsin for admission into the Union, to pass an act whereby the grant of five hundred thousand acres of land, to which the state of Wisconsin is entitled by the

provisions of an act of congress entitled “ an act to appropriate the proceeds of the sales of the public lands, and to grant pre-emption rights," approved the fourth day of September, eighteen hundred and forty-one, and also the five per centum of the nett proceeds of the public lands lying within the state, to which it shall become entitled on its admission into the Union, by the provisions of an act of congress, entitled “ an act to enable the people of Wisconsin territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union,” approved the sixth day of August, eighteen hundred and forty-six, shall be granted to the state of Wisconsin for the use of schools, instead of the purposes mentioned in said acts of congress respectively.

Resolved, That the congress of the United States be, and hereby is, requested, upon the admission of this state into the Union, so to alter the provisions of the act of congress, entitled “an act to grant a certain quantity of land to aid in the improvement of the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, and to connect the same by a canal in the territory of Wisconsin,” that the price of the lands reserved to the United States shall be reduced to the mininum price of the public lands.

Resolved, That the legislature of this state shall make provision by law for the sale of the lands granted to the state in aid of said improvements, subject to the same rights of pre-emption to the settlers thereon, as are now allowed by law to settlers on the public lands.

Resolved, That the foregoing resolutions be appended to and signed with the constitution of Wisconsin, and submitted therewith to the people of this territory, and to the congress of the United States. In testimony whereof we have hereunto set our hands, at Madison, the first day of February, A. D. eighteen hundred and forty eight.

MORGAN L. MARTIN, President. Thomas McHugi, Secretary.

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This country, during the Spanish rule, constituted a part of the viceroyalty of Mexico, or New Spain. When Mexico became a federal republic, not finding California sufficiently populous to form a state, she established over it a territorial government, of which Los Angeles and Monterey were the seats.

A few years since the country between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific was unknown; except in some parts of Oregon, which had been laid open by the discoveries of Capt. Grey, in 1792, and by the explorations of Lewis and Clarke, in 1803.

The American government, in 1838, sent out a naval Exploring Expedition, under Captain Charles Wilkes, who was directed to make surveys of the coasts of Oregon and California, with special reference to the bay of San Francisco. He pronounced the harbor of San Francisco to be one of the finest, if not the very best in the world.” The town, then called Yerba Buena, “consisted of one large frame building, occupied by the Hudson Bay Company; the store of an American merchant, a billiard-room, and a bar; a cabin of a ship, occupied as a dwelling ;besides out-houses, few and far between.”

The most prominent man in the region was Capt. Sutter, a Swiss by birth, but immigrating from Missouri. Having obtained from Mexico a grant of land thirty leagues square, he located his residence within it, and built a fort at the confluence of the American river with the Sacramento, near the place since called Sacramento City. Capt. Wilkes reported well of the soil and productiveness of the country. He related a recent military contest, in which the scale was turned by the valor of twenty-five American hunters.

Mr. Polk came into the presidency with a war upon his hands. He doubtless intended so to conduct it that it should redound to the honor and advantage of his country ; being early determined to obtain California and New Mexico. But a project was on foot to place California beyond the reach of the American government, and under the protection of the British. This was in part to be effected through the agency of Blacnamara, an Irish priest, who, before the beginning of the war, visited the city of Mexico, and obtained grants of some of the best ports and most fertile lands of California. Capt. Fremont was sent overland, early in the spring of 1845, to California, ostensibly for scientific exploration, with 63 men,

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composed of the famous and noble hunter and guide, Kit Carson, and others like him, ready, with sinews of steel, to do or to dare ;– furnished with artillery, and armed with Colt's revolvers, If Mr. Polk's object was to counterwork the British plot, his measures and agents were well chosen, and his plans completely successful.

The Mexican treaty, signed at Gaudalupe Hidalgo, Feb. 2, 1848, added to the American Republic vast tracts, of which the California portiou had a framework of society adverse to our own, many patriots looked with apprehension for the result, knowing that ordinarily the full river keeps the course tirst taken by the rivulet. Would enough of our citizens go thither to turn this course—to fuse this portion into the common mass? Providence presented a material to draw them so quickly, and in such ample numbers, that they at once constituted the principal stream of Californian society, into which all minor currents, not excepting the original, were merged; and Gold, the curse of other lands, was a blessing to this.

In February, 1818, a private discovery of gold was made on the grounds of Capt. Sutter, by a Mr. Marshall, then in bis employ, twenty-five miles up the American Fork of the Sacramento. It was soon found in other localities. Rumors of California gold reached the Atlantic States, which were converted to certainty by the President's message of December, 1819, accompanied by a letter from Gov. Mason, who had been in person to visit the gold diggings. As he passed along, he found houses deserted, and fields of wheat going to ruin; their owners having left them to dig for gold. Such had been the quantities found, that every convenience of life bore an enormous price. Capt. Sutter paid his blacksmith ten dollars per day; and he received five hundred dollars per month for the rent of a two-story house within his fort. Gov. Dason followed up the American to the sawmill, in whose raceway the golden scales were first discovered. He visited other “ placers," and saw multitudes engaged in the beds of streams, and in dry ravines, where water-courses had once existed. In a little gutter two men bad found the value of seventeen thousand dollars. The ordinary yield for a day's work was two ounces,

Such were the facts reported from unquestionable sources; and California at once became the one luminous point, to which all eyes were directed. There was a rush for the land of gold, not only from the United States, but from Europe, Asia, South America, and the isles of the sea.

From December, 1849, to January, 1850, 99 vessels from the United States. 52 from New York; 29 from New England. From October, 1849, to October, 1850, one year, arrived at San Francisco, 48,615 immigrants by sea, and 33,000 by land.

The 13th of October, 1849, will be memorable in the annals of California. On that day the members of the Convention elected to draft a constitution set their signatnres to this noble instrument. The President of this body was Robert Semple, a native of Kentucky; the Secretary, Wm. G. Marcy, of New York.

The constitution was adopted by the people Nov. 13, 1849. Population, in 1850, 200,000.

CONSTITUTION.

ARTICLE I.- Declaration of Rights. Sec. 1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness.

2. All political power is inherent in the people. Government is

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