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THE

LONDON MAGAZINE.

FEBRUARY, 1824.

CONTENTS.

By

On Death ......

The Lion's head.

The Song of the Maidens.
ALLAN CUNNINGHAM..........

151 ANALECTS FROMJohn Paul Rich. Translations of Modern French Poets.

TER. By the Author of Confes. MESSENIAN ELEGIES of Casimir sions of an English Opium Eater.

de la Vigne

153 Complaint of the Bird in a dark

Battle of Waterloo

154 ened Cage..

117
Christian Greece.

156 Union

158 On the Death of Young Children 117 The Prophetic Dew-Drops...... 117

Parthenope and the Stranger . 160 The Quarterly Review on Tithes .... 162

118 Satirical Notice of Reviewers, &c. 118 A PEN and Ink Sketch of a late

TRIAL for MURDER in a Letter A Walk to PAESTUM, LUCOSIA, &c. 122

from Hertford. By EDWARD HERThe Three Fountains—a Specimen BERT, Esq

165 of Popular Poetry, from the Old

Poetical Dedication prefixed by Goethe SCLAVONICO-Polish DIALECT

to his Poems.

186 of Volhynia. Translated by Mr. BOWRING

Stanzas from the Polish of ZIMO-
132
ROWICZ ......

188 MEMOIR and REMAINS of CHARLES

MEMOIRS of Rossini.

189 FORSTER FEATHERSTONHAUCH 133

Review: The Adventures of Hajji The Nightingale, from the Dutch of

Baba of Ispahan.....

193 MARIA TESSELSCHADE Viss.

140

The DRAMA.— The Pantomimes... 197 CHER HISTORICO-CRITICAL INQUIRY

Review: Prose by a Poet..... 202 into the ORIGIN of the RosIcRU- Sonnets from the Italian....

205 CIANS and the FREE-MASONS. By REPORT of Music, and Review of the Opium Eater.

New Musical Publications...

207 Chap. III.–Of the Circum

Sketch of Foreign Literature .. 211 stances which gave Occasion to

View OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, Agri. the Rise of the Rosicrucian

culture, Commerce ..

214 Order, and the earliest Authen. tic Records of it .....

140 Literary Intelligence, and List of Books Chap. IV._Of the immediate published

.221, 222 Results of the Fama and the Ecclesiastical Preferments Confessio in Germany 146 | Births, Marriages, and Deaths 223, 224

223

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR TAYLOR AND HESSEY.

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THE LION'S HEAD.

The translations of E. of P—W—, near Tare sensibly rendered, but they require a spirit which neither the translation nor the original gives them, to make them fit for our pages. They are extremely good. Exercises,—but morals so laboriously and mathematically worked are more virtuous than amusing or intelligible. We sincerely thank E. for his good intentions towards the world and ourselves.

G.G. has sent us a Canzonet, which imposes more upon the birds than we think Nature ever intended :

Hark the birds in yonder grove,
Breathe softly sweet a tale of love:

In joyful harmony, oh raise
Your heavenly notes to Ellen's praise

Tune your voices once again,
Whisper softly-true I'll prove
To Ellen, whom I fondly love;
And while my beauteous maid reposes,

Strew her couch with blooming roses ! G. G. must slit a bird's tongue with something more than a sixpence to get all this done ; and no bird on earth can sing songs and strew rose-leaves at the same time.

J. B.'s “ Sketches from the Antique,” are not favourably thought of from No. 1.-though that specimen has talent.

“ An odd Fish!”-aye-a very odd Fish!—This Peter Fin writes, that if we do not approve him, we are to remember, “ he is one of the Fin tribe," and therefore not au fait." - Therefore !- eh!

Such a wooden legged muse as this “odd Fish” seems to possess, never stumpt before into the presence of Lion's Head !

P. P. asks us to “ point out a few errors” in “ the enclosed,” which is a kind of dwarf Ode to Simplicity. We can only say, that Grammar, if not the Muse, has frowned upon his effusion, for no melody on earth, nor the utmost urgency of rhyme, can atone for such matter as this.

It is not pride! But oh! 'Tis thee !
Sweet Nature's child, Simplicity!

Or this:

Or when thou guileless doth appeal,

P. P. should be allowed a fire by his friends.

We print the Title of T. O. M.'s production, which is the pope's eye of his mutton, viz. “ Rondeau for the Grenadier Guards, attempted in the style and metre of Clement Marot." Tom's a-cold!"

The lines from Edinburgh are better meant than written.

J. R. is so humble before “Lion's Head,” that with infinite mercy it forbeareth to “ wag its tail.”

Z. can know nothing of “ The fate of a Genius," and should therefore not « riddle

my
riddle

my

ree" about it in lines, which would give Edipus the head-ache.

A Dream (fact)." We do not dispute the truth, but the poetry ; though it looks very much like a dream to order !

A. D. is not answered, as he desires. We are sure he will see that there is not “ matter in his words” to warrant troubling the printer on the subject.

THE

London Magazine.

FEBRUARY, 1824.

ANALECTS

FROX

JOHN PAUL RICHTER.

THE AUTHOR OF THE CONFESSIONS OF AN ENGLISH OPIUM-EATER.

COMPLAINT OF THE BIRD IN A DARKENED CAGE.

« Ah!" said the imprisoned bird, for the darkness had been purposely “ how unhappy were I in my eternal contrived to assist in its instruction. night, but for those melodious tones -Oh! man, how often dost thou which sometimes make their way to complain of overshadowing grief and me like beams of light from afar, and of darkness resting upon thy days ! cheer my gloomy day; But I will And yet what cause for complaint, myself repeat these heavenly me- unless indeed thou hast failed to lodies like an echo, until I have learn wisdom from suffering ? -For stamped them in my heart; and then is not the whole sum of human life a I shall be able to bring comfort to veiling and an obscuring

of the immyself in my darkness !” Thus mortal spirit of man? Then first, spoke the little warbler, and soon when the fleshly curtain falls away, had learned the sweet airs that were may it soar upwards into a region of sung to it with voice and instrument. happier melodies ! That done, the curtain was raised;

ON THE DEATH OF YOUNG CHILDREN.

Ephemera die all at sun-set, and dawn, and in the eastern light; ye no insect of this class has ever drank only of the prelibations of life; spo in the beams of the morning hovered for a little space over a

Happier are ye, little human world of freshness and of blossoms; ephemera! Ye played only in the and fell asleep in innocence before ascending beams, and in the early yet the morning dew was exhaled !

sun.

THE PROPHETIC DEW-DROPS.

A delicate child, pale and prema- and sparkle in the moon-light and turely wise, was complaining on a through the morning onwards to hot morning that the poor dew-drops noon-day: “ The sun," said the had been too hastily snatched away child, « has chased them away with and not allowed to glitter on the his heat—or swallowed them in his flowers likeother happier dew-drops,t wrath.” Soon after came rain and that live the whole night through, a rainbow; whereupon his father

Some class of ephemeral insects are born about five o'clock in the afternoon, and die before midnight-supposing them to live to old age.

+ If the dew is evaporated immediately upon the sun-rising, rain and storm follow in the afternoon; but, if it stays and glitters for a long-time after sun-rise, the day continues fair. Feb. 1821.

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