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Southern District of New-York, ss. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the Tenth

day of April, A. D. 1827, in the Fifty-first L. S.

year of the Independence of the United States *** of America, G. & C. CARVILL, of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit:

Lel ters on Clerical Manners and Habits; addressed to a Student in the Theological Seminary, at Princeton, N.J. By SAMUEL MILLER, D. D. Professor of Ecclesiastical His. tory and Church Government, in the said Seminary.

In conformity to the Act of Congress of the United States, entitled “ An Act for the encouragement of Learning, hy seeuring the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned.”

And also to an Act, entitled “ An Act, supplement. ary to an Act, entitled an Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other printe."

FRED. I. BETTS,
Olesk of the Sorsthern District of Non-York.

1

IX A. BORRENSTEIN, PRINT,

PRINCETON, N. .

1477

72

LETTERS

ON

CLERICAL MANNERS AND HABITS.

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On conversation--Importance of the subject-

Talking too much--Excessive silence-Tale-
bearing and tattling-Prying into the secrets of
families--Propagating ill reports--Discussion of
personal character and conduct-Making conver-
sation useful--Making preparation to converse

- Paying close attention in conversation—Treat-
ing what is said by others respectfully-Looking
the individual with whom we converse in the
face-Opposing erroneous sentiments in a suita-
ble manner-Haughtiness in conversation.-Con-
troversy--Losing the temper in controversy
Ease and attractiveness in conv ersation-Too
much readiness to make promises of service-
Disposition to take offence--Sudden and excessive
intimaciesMaintaining personal dignity in con-
versation--Retailing anecdotes-Repeating old
proverbs--Coarseness or .indelicacy--Interrupt.

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