Domestic fowl: their natural history, breeding, rearing, and general management

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 20 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long...
Page 38 - I may mention, as the most striking, that the wing is jointed, so that the posterior half, can, at pleasure, be doubled up, and brought forward between the anterior half and the body. The birds can do this at pleasure, and the appearance the manoeuvre imparts to their form, has procured for them the title of Ostrich Fowl.
Page 65 - About the fifteenth of Henry VIII. (1524) : there is no reliance to be placed upon it, as far at least as the fish is concerned ; for Dame Juliana Barnes, or Berners, Prioress of Sopewell Nunnery, mentions, in the Boke of St.
Page 14 - The total amount of the exportations for that year was 3,829,284 francs. The consumption in Paris is calculated at 11,5,-; eggs per head, or 101,012,400. The consumption in other parts of France may be reckoned at double this rate, as, in many parts of the country, dishes composed of eggs and milk are the principal items in all the meals.
Page 23 - Gallus giganteus,' and called by Marsden the ' St. Jago Fowl,' is frequently so tall as to be able to peck crumbs without difficulty from an ordinary dinner-table. The weight is usually from ten to thirteen or fourteen pounds. The comb of both cock and hen is large, crown shaped, often double, and sometimes, but not invariably, with a tufted crest of feathers, which occurs with the greatest frequency...
Page 74 - ... time, the better chance there is of rearing it ; as the hen which is so turned away, will lay again in a fortnight or three weeks, and thus hatch a second time before the month of July is out. Even under these circumstances, the chance of rearing the young ones is very uncertain, as they are hardly strong enough to meet the cold nights in the autumn, when they often become what is called club-footed, and die. I rather recommend letting the hen lay as many eggs as she will, and turning her off...
Page 74 - ... hatched about the same time, the better chance there is of rearing it ; as the hen which is so turned away, will lay again in a fortnight or three weeks, and thus hatch a second time before the month of July is out. Even under these circumstances, the chance of rearing the young ones is very uncertain, as they are hardly strong enough to meet the cold nights in the Autumn, when they often become what is called club-footed, and die.
Page 92 - I have here given it. This bird is chiefly remarkable for its vast size — a property in which it casts every other known breed far into the shade ; it is, indeed, the Mammoth of geese, and is to be regarded as a most valuable addition to our stock. The prevailing...
Page 13 - His allowance, or rather his gain, was one shilling upon every six score of eggs brought in — the risk, purchase, and carriage resting entirely on himself. The prices vary from time to time, at different periods of the year ; but they are never changed, without previous notice to the runners. In the height of the season, the prices, at Lanesborough, were from 2s. 6d. to 4s. per 120 ; but towards the winter they rise to 5s. The eggs are packed in layers with straw, in such crates as are commonly...
Page 77 - When they get their head feathers, they are hardy enough ; and what they then want is room to prowl about. It is best to breed them under a common hen, because she does not ramble like a hen turkey ; and, it is a very curious thing, that the turkeys bred up by a hen of the common fowl, do not themselves ramble much when they get old...

Bibliographic information