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SACRED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY:

FROM THE ANTEDILUVIAN PERIOD TO THE TIME OF THE

PROPHET MALACHI.

A.M. 1 TO A.M. 3607, B.C. 397.

EDITED AND PARTLY WRITTEN

By F. A. COX, D.D., LL.D.

HACKNEY.

SECOND EDITION, REVISED.

CONTENTS.

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172 Tola,

Othniel,

176 Jair,

Ehud,

177 Jephthah,

Shamgar,

177 Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon,

eborah,

178 Samson,

Gideon,

180 Samuel,

Abimelech,

182 | Saul,

CHAP. VII.-DAVID, Born A.M. 2919, B.C. 1085—Died A.M. 2989, B.C.

1015,

SECTION 1.-Early Prosperity of David,

2.-David's Exile, and Personal Situation, until his Final

Possession of the Throne of all Israel,

3.—The Period of David's Public Prosperity,

4.—The Period of David's Public Trials,

172

184

184

184

185

186

190

192

195

195

205

212

221

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CHAP. VIII.—THE ISRAELITISH MONARCHY, FROM THE REIGN OF

SOLOMON TO THE CAPTIVITY OF THE TEN TRIBES, B.C. 1015 to B.C.

721,

227

Solomon,

227 | Jehoram,

248

Rehoboam,

237 Elisha,

249

Jeroboam,

238 Jehu,

252

Abijah,

240 Athaliah, Joash, Jehoahaz, Je-

Asa,

240 hoash,

253

Baasha, Elah, Zimri, 241 Amaziah, Jeroboam II., Üzziah, 254

Ahab,

242 Zachariah, Shallun, Menahem, 255

Elijah the Tishbite,

242 Pekah, Jotham, Ahaz,

255

Jehoshaphat,

245 Hoshea,

256

Ahaziah,

247 | Captivity of the Ten Tribes,

257

CHAP. IX.--THE ISRAELITISH MONARCHY, FROM THE CAPTIVITY OF

THE TEN TRIBES TO THE CAPTIVITY OF JUDAH. B.C. 643, to B.C. 588,

259

Hezekiah,

259

Manasseh,

259

Amon, Josiah, Jehoahaz,

260

Jehoiachin, Zedekiah,

261

Captivity of Judah,

261

The Prophets of this Æra,

262

Jonah,

262

Amos, Hosea,

266

Micah,

267

Nahum, Joel, Zephaniah,

268

Habakkuk,

269

CHAP. X.-ISAIAH, AND THE HISTORICAL EVENTS CONNECTED WITH

HIS PROPHECIES. From A.M. 3244, B.C. 760; to A.M. 3306, B.C. 698, 271

CHAP. XI.—NEBUCHADNEZZAR. Flourished about A.M. 3399, B.C. 605;

to A.M. 3442, B.C. 562,

289

CHAP. XII.—DANIEL. Flourished from about A.M. 3398, B.C. 606; to

A.M. 3470, B.C. 534,

309

CHAP. XIII.-JEREMIAH. From A.M. 3362, B.C. 642; to A.M. 3418,

B.C. 586,

328

CHAP. XIV.-EZEKIEL. Flourished about A.M. 3409, B.C. 595,

346

CHAP. XV.-EZRA AND NEHEMIAH. Flourished from A.M. 3547,

B.C. 457; to A.M. 3570, B.C. 434,

360

CHAP. XVI.-THE LATTER MINOR PROPHETS. Flourished from about

A.M. 3416, B.C. 588; to A.M. 3607, B.C. 397,

371

Obadiah,

371 General Reflections on the Pro-

Haggai,

372 phetic Testimony,

375

Zechariah,

372 Chronological Table of the Pro-

Malachi,

phets,

378

CHAP. XVII.—THE ILLUSTRIOUS WOMEN OF ANCIENT ISRAEL,

379

Sarah,

379 | Hannah,

385

Rebekah,

381 | Esther,

388

Ruth,

383

INDEX,

393

.

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374

INTRODUCTORY DISSERTATION:

ON

THE CLAIMS AND USES OF SACRED HISTORY.

SACRED HISTORY is that narrative of events, commencing from Sacred the creation of the world, which is recorded in the Bible, and is so Defined. called, because it is assumed to be written under divine superintendence, and is evidently associated with the being, perfections, and plans of Deity. All other History details facts simply, but Sacred History combines them with the doctrine of providence, and demonstrates the event to be coincident with the purposes of an infinite mind.

The connection of every mode of communicating the will of God to man with moral and eternal purposes, is a feature of divine revelation never to be overlooked; and sacred history is but a part of that revelation. In preparing mankind for another world, the Universal Parent has adopted and recorded a certain process with individuals, with families, and with nations in this: and as the distinctive Claims and Uses of Sacred History originate from its connection with the general subject of Revelation, we may be permitted to advert to that subject briefly, while further than this it is not here our province to pursue the argument.

It is a striking fact, that upon the great subject of morals, philo- Necessity of sophers who, upon the whole, were agreed as to the amount of individual and social duties, were at variance with regard to the basis on which they should be constructed. Unless men concur in their standard of moral duties, they must be doubtful as to the extent of their obligation ; and when the most eminent of mankind were found to question what was the rule by which they ought to be guided, variance and opposition among those who looked up to

kevelation.

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