The miscellaneous poetic works of E. Cummins

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Page 23 - On the demise of a person of eminence, it is confidently averred that he had a hand "open as day to melting charity," and that "take him for all in all, we ne'er shall look upon his like again.
Page 36 - Though leagued in war tremendous round thy shore — But from thyself thy ruin must proceed ! Nor boast thy power; for know it is decreed: Thy freedom lost, thy power shall be no more...
Page 107 - Twas beauty drew his ruin on ; He saw young Daphne on the plain : He loved, believed, and was undone. His heart then sunk beneath the storm, (Sad meed of unexampled truth,) And sorrow, like an envious worm, Devour'd the blossom of his youth. Beneath this stone the youth is laid ; O greet his ashes with a tear! May Heaven with blessings crown his shade, And grant that peace he wanted here.
Page 15 - Mr. Beatty now approached to examine the wound. His Lordship was raised up; and Beatty, whose attention was anxiously fixed upon the eyes of his patient, as an indication the most certain when a wound is mortal, after a few moments glanced his eye on Bourke, and expressed his opinion in his countenance. Lord Nelson now turned to Bourke, and said, 'Tell Hardy to come to me.
Page 36 - Britannia ! lov'd parental land ! Regard thy welfare with a watchful eye ! Whene'er the weight of Want's afflicting hand Wakes in thy vales the poor's persuasive cry — • When wealth enormous sets the oppressor high, When bribes thy ductile senators command, And slaves in office freemens...
Page 14 - Scott, who was not, as has been represented, either receiving directions from him, or standing by him, but was communicating some orders to an officer at a distant part of the quarter-deck, was cut almost in two by a cannon-shot. He expired on the instant, and was thrown overboard. Lord Nelson observed the act of throwing his secretary overboard, and said, as if doubtful, to a midshipman who was near him, 'Was that Scott?
Page 63 - For see ! the British genius comes, to cheer Thy fainting sons, and kindle them to war. With her own glorious fires their souls she warms, And bids them burn for liberty and arms. Unhappy land ! the foremost once in fame, Once lifting to the stars thy noble name, In arts excelling, and in arms severe, The western kingdoms' envy, and their fear: Where is thy pride, thy conscious honour, flown, Thy ancient valour, and thy first renown?
Page 14 - ... related, picked up by Captain Hardy. In the hurry of the battle, which was then raging in its greatest violence, even the fall of their beloved Commander did not interrupt the business of the quarter-deck. Two sailors, however, who were near his Lordship, raised him in their arms, and carried him to the cockpit. He was immediately laid upon a bed, and the following is the substance of the conversation which really took place in the cockpit, between his Lordship, Captain Hardy, Mr. Bourke, and...
Page 15 - Lord Nelson permitted him, and, passing his left hand round his waist, he probed it with the fore-finger of his right. When Bourke returned into the cockpit with Captain Hardy, Lord Nelson told the latter to come near him. "Kiss me, Hardy !" he exclaimed. - Captain Hardy kissed his cheek. - "I hope your Lordship," he said, "will still live to enjoy your triumph.
Page 60 - Warwick to his care. Give him, she said, whate'er diviner grace Adorns the soul, or beautifies the face. Let manly constancy confirm his truth, And gentlest manners crown his blooming youth. Give him to fame, to virtue to aspire, Worthy our songs and thy informing fire: All various praise, all honours, let him prove. Let men admire, and sighing virgins love: With honest zeal inflame his generous mind, To love his country, and protect mankind.

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