The Causes of the War of Independence: Being the First Volume of a History of the Founding of the American Republic, Volume 1

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Houghton Mifflin, 1922 - Great Britain - 499 pages
Among scholars there has been during the last twenty years a decided modification in the old views of the causes which led to the American Revolution. This important book by the head of the history department in the University of Michigan is the first in which the results of these investigations and reconsiderations -- supplemented by twenty years of investigation by the author in the archives of America, France, and England -- have been used as a basis for a history that is at once illuminating, authoritative, and distinctly stimulating for the general reader as well as for the historical student. - Jacket.
 

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Page 477 - It is a weed that grows in every soil. They may have it from Spain, they may have it from Prussia. But, until you become lost to all feeling of your true interest and your natural dignity, freedom they can have from none but you.
Page 159 - This study renders men acute, inquisitive, dexterous, prompt in attack, ready in defence, full of resources. In other countries, the people, more simple, and of a less mercurial cast, judge of an ill principle in government only by an actual grievance ; here they anticipate the evil, and judge of the pressure of the grievance by the badness of the principle. They augur misgovernment at a distance, and snuff the approach of tyranny in every tainted breeze.
Page 188 - At the same time let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.
Page 317 - I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in Providence for the illumination of the ignorant, and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.
Page 362 - The God of Israel said, the Rock of Israel spake to me ; He that ruleth over men must be just, ruling in the fear of God: and He shall be as the light of the morning, when the sun riseth, even a morning without clouds; as the tender grass springing out of the earth by clear shining after rain.
Page 291 - Whether it be lawful to resist the Supreme Magistrate, if the Commonwealth cannot otherwise be preserved...
Page 388 - Captain, of a Halter around your Neck — ten Gallons of liquid Tar decanted on your Pate — with the Feathers of a dozen wild Geese laid over that to enliven your Appearance...
Page 373 - Adams then arose, and made that motion which included the whole revolution, "that a committee of correspondence be appointed, to consist of twenty-one persons, to state the rights of the colonists, and of this province in particular, as men, as Christians, and as subjects ; to communicate ami publish the same to the several towns in this province and to the world, as the sense of this town, with the infringements and violations thereof that have been, or from time to time may be, made ; also requesting...
Page 66 - For these reasons there are not more useful members in a commonwealth than merchants. They knit mankind together in a mutual intercourse of good offices, distribute the gifts of nature, find work for the poor, add wealth to the rich, and magnificence to the great.
Page 155 - Shortly after I Came in one of the members stood up and said he had read that in former times tarquin and Julus had their Brutus, Charles had his Cromwell, and he Did not Doubt but some good american would stand up, in favour of his Country...

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