Pro Bono in Principle and in Practice: Public Service and the Professions

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Stanford University Press, 2005 - Law - 244 pages
This book explores the aspirational principles and actual practices concerning lawyers pro bono service. It begins from the premise that both the profession and the public have much to gain from reducing the gap between ideals and institutions. To that end, the book provides the first broad-scale study of the factors that influence American lawyers pro bono work, including an original empirical survey of over 3,000 lawyers. Attention is focused on the workplace factors and law school experiences that encourage charitable public interest activities. The book also includes the first comparative study of public service by looking at volunteer work by other professionals and by lawyers in other countries.

Part I of the book explores the literature on altruistic commitments among the public in general, and lawyers in particular. Part II traces the evolution of attorneys pro bono responsibilities. Part III presents findings of the empirical survey. Part IV draws on these findings, together with prior research, to propose strategies for increasing and improving lawyers pro bono activity.

 

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Contents

Chapter
26
ALTRUISTIC BEHAVIOR
55
Chapter Four
73
Chapter Five
100
AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS
125
Chapter Seven
154
Chapter Eight
166
Appendices
181
Notes
189
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About the author (2005)

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law and Director of the Keck Center on Legal Ethics and the Legal Profession at the Stanford Law School. She has written and edited fourteen previous books, including The Difference "Difference" Makes: Women and Leadership (Stanford, 2003).

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