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PRICES of STOCKS, &c. in NOVEMBER, 1776.
India Sou. Sea, Old S. S. New S. S., 3 per C. 13 per C. 3 per C., 3 per C.13 per C.B.4. P. C3 {B. ¡LO, An,,In. B. NavyB. Lortery Wind Weath
Stock Stock Ann. Ann. reduced consols

In Ann. B. 1726. 1751

'Conf. 1 1758

Prem. Disc. Tick. , Deal. London

44 2 IT 8 N Fair 83

H16 ONE (165 82 83

44

E 163

82 83

44

U 17 6 NE 165 82

44

N

NE
81
82 83

N
363

Foggy
81

86 ý

ol SW 163

81 82

86

4.2

61 SW
16 8

86
42

W 81 83

61 W 81

42 Ii 18 6 NW

NE Fair 167 83

42

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42
11 18

W
169

83

86

42 12 1

S 169

81 82 83

86

42

o SW Rain 169

86

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13 5

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81

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85

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37

13 5 OVNE 82 83

37

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CN E 165 82 4

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NE 165

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44

13 9

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NNW
AVERAGE PRICES of GRAIN, by the Standard WINCHESTER Bushel,
Wheat.
Rye. | Barley, | Oats. Beans,
Wheat, Rye. Barley. (als. Beans.

Wheat, Rye. Barley: Oats. (Bea. d. 3. d. s, d.

s. d. s. d. s. d.

s. d.

d. 1. d. 6 3

8 3 9 North Wales 5 2

1 II 7 7

Scotland

3 6

3 8 3 4 3 0 8

3 4 South Wales 5 3 7 2 10

4 3

6

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THE

LONDON MAGAZINE,

1776.

FOR NOVEMBER,

For the LONDON MAGAZINE.'
Account of INCHSTUTHEL, the modern DELVIN, the Seat of John

MACKENSIE, E/9;*
(Illustrated with an accurate Engraving.)

* HE situation of the This place had also another secu. 4

house is very singular. rity which time hath diverted from T

On aflat of 154 Scotch them: the river Tay once entirely acres t, regularly steep environed the place, and formed it on every side, and in into an island, as the name in the anevery part of equal cient language, which it ftill retains,

height---about 60 feet imports; that of Inch-Ituthel, or the above the great plain of Stormont ille of Tuthel. The river at present which it stands on. The figure is very runs on one side only : but there are remarkable as appears from the plate. plain marks on the north in particu

“ Two nations took advantage of lar, not only of a channel, but of this natural ftrength, and situated some pieces of water, oblong, narrow, themselves on it. The Picts, the long and pointing in the direction the Tay poffeffors of these eastern parts of the had taken, before it had ceased to inkingdom, in all probability had here sulate this piece of ground. I canan oppidum, or town, such as uncivi- not ascertain the period when its lized people inhabited in early times; waters confined themselves to one often in the midst of woods, and for- bed; but am informed that a grant tified all round with a dike. Here still exists from one of the James's of a we find the vestiges of such a defence; right of filing in the river, at Caput a mound of stones and earth running mac Athol, east of the place. along the margin of the steep, in ma- It is not to be imagined that there ny places entire : in others, time or can be any traces of the habitations accident hath rendered it less visibie, of a people who dwelt in the most peor hath totally destroyed it. The rishable hovels : but as the most barftones were not found on the spot : barous nations paid more attention to but were brought from a place two the remains of the dead, than to the miles distant, where quarries of the conveniency of the living, they formfame kind are ftill in ule.

ed, either for the protection of the Another dike crosses the ground, reliques of their chieftains from in- , from margin to margin, in the place sults of man, or favage beast, or for it begins to grows narrow, This fepulchral memorials, mounts of difseems intended as the first defence ferent sizes. against an enemy, Mould the inhabi. Monuments of this kind are tants fail in defending their out- very frequent over the face of this works, and be obliged to quit their plain : the tumuli are round, not ftation and retire to a stronger part. greatly elevated, and at their basis Near the extremity is what I dould surrounded with a fofs. Many bones name their citadel; for a small por- have been found in some of these tion of the end is cut off from the rest barrows, neither lodged in tone by five great dikes, and as many chests nor deposited in urns. deep fosses ; and within that is the The Romans, in their course along strong hold, impregnable against the this part of Britain, did not neglect 10 neighbouring nations.

fine a si-uation for a station. NotNov, 1776.

withganding By Mr. Pennnat. + One Scotch acre is one acre, one rood, and one perch Englisb.

4 Cz

withstanding the great change made this hiftorian took the early part of by inclosures, by plantation, and by his work are unknown to us, any fur. agriculture, there are still vestiges of ther than what we learn from himone station five hundred yards square. felf, that they were records sent to The side next to Delvin house is bare. him in 1525 from Jona; but by whom ly to be traced ; and part of another compileu, remains undiscovered. I borders on the margin of the bank. do not doubt his assertion ; nor do I There is likewise a small square doubt but that some truths collected redoubt, near the edge, facing the from traditions may be scattered East Inch in the Tay; which covered amidft the innumerable legendary the station on that lide.

tales, so abundant in his firft books. The first was once inclosed with a This I would wish to place among wall fourteen feet thick, whose foun- the former, as the actual veftiges of dations are remembered by two far- two nations are still to be traced on mers of the name of Stertan, aged the spot. I would also call it the Or. about seventy; who had received from rea of the Romans, which the learned their father and grandfather frequent Stukely supposes to have been Perth, accounts of anes, cinders, brick, notwithstanding he places it in his map iron utensils, weapons, and large north-east of the Tay, and on the very pieces of lead, having been frequent. spot where the present Delvin ftands. ly found on the fpot, in the course Near this spot is Loncarty, celebra. of ploughing: and to the west of ted for the signal victory obtained by this station, about thirty years ago the Scots under Kenneth II. over the were discovered the vestiges of a large, Danes, by means of the gallant pea. building, the whole ground being fant Hay and his two sons, who with filled with fragments of brick and no other weapons than yokes, which mortar. A rectangular hollow made they snatched from their oxen then of brick is Aill entire ; it is about ten at plough, first stopped the fight of or twelve feet long, three or four their countrymen, and afterwards led feet wide, and five or fix feet deep them on to action. The noble families Boethius calls this place the Tulina of of Hay derive their descent from this the Picts; and adds, that in their ruftic, and in memory of the action time it was a most populous city ; bear for their arins the instrument of but was deserted and burnt by them their victory, with the motto of fubjugo. on the approach of the Romans un- The king granted Hay as much der Agricola. He also informs us, ground as a falcon would surround in that it bore the name of Inchtuthel in its flight; of which Delvin is thought his days. The materials from which to be a part.

For the LONDON MAGAZIN E.

THE BRITISH THEATRE.

OME of the leading causes of the extreme meant to throw it by and blindly truf to

their assurances.- We concluded our critivery freely, and, we hope, very impartially cism for last month in the following remark. discufled by us in our general Critique for able words: “ We are permitted to say no the last month. Towards the conclusion of more at present, but that the managers of that month however, a kind of retormation Covent Garden, are forgiven their sld faults, heing promised by the managers, of both the managers of both houses, fince the com. huvies, by specious advertisements, informing mencement of the present reason, their new the Town ibat the productions of Congreve, ones; and that there is nothing we more and some other of our moft celebrated dra- sincerely dehre, than that observations for matic writers, would be fortly served up, the month of November may, with judice, it induced us to check that degree of critical abound with well-founded panegyric, infiead chaftisement, which truth would have amply of jus censure. juftified, but which promises of amendment Thus stood the account between the Au. in future, would not then permit us to in- thor of these detached observations on one niet. We held the rod suspended over the part, and Meffrs. Sheridan and Co. and managers heads, in terrorem : neve Meffis. Harris and Co. with their respeáive

fuites,

we

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