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1776.

249

State of the BUDGET, as opened by LORD NORTH,
Wednesday April 24, 1776, witb cacb Article arranged under its

Separate Head.
ARM Y.

SUPPLIES.
20752 land forces, with 3213 invalids 659200 2 10}
Plantations and Africa

723432 11 73 Irish and British pay for troops in America

42530 19 4 General and staff officers

11505 7 3 Levy money for augmentation of British and Irim forces for 1776

104136 6 6 5 Hanoverian battalions of foot at Gi.

braltar and Minorca, from the ist Sept. to the 24th December, 1775

26783 15 21 Ditto for 1776

46838 1 9 Charge of a regiment of Highlanders, confifting of two battalions

47400 12 Charge of augmentation to his majefty's forces to December 24, 1775

80984' 13 2 Ditto ex. saving grants lait leffions, 7938 15 Chelsea Hospital

107572 10 Reduced officers

97575 12 2 troops horse guards reduced

850 19 6 Pensions to widows

608. o 12394 Hessians for 1776

381887 4 5 4300 Brunswickers ditto

121475 12 Regiment of Hanau, from March 6, to

December 24, being 294 days 19006 19 33 - 6 regiments of foot from Ireland, and

other augmentations, to December 24, 1776

137448 7 Land extras

845165 14 84

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250 Total of Parliamentary Supplies for the Year 1776. May Georgia

3086 East Florida

4950 West Florida

4063: 19 3 Senegambia

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54070 4 10 Expence of and loss by coinage

92421 15 1 Exchequer bills discharged

1250000

o O DEFICIENCIES Malt

189778 11 Land

260221 31 per cents

44096 5 10$ Coinage Grants 1775

37348 12 8

£ 538920 4 2 Total of supply

9097577 17 10} Excess of ways and means

56652 6 55

£. 91 54230 4 42 WAYS and MEANS 1776. Land

45. Malt

750000 Surplus in finking fund, 5th January

17869 4 uit Ditto, ditto April 5

962571 16 Growing produce ditto

1837428 3 10 Gum seneca French prize money

17000 Certain savings in pay-office

23011 Sale of ceded isands

30000 New exchequer bills

1500000 Surplus of American revenues

2905 8 Sundry surplusles in exchequer, consisting of surplus of duty on rice, cambrick, apples, militia money, &c.

11444 4 31 Total of ways and means

£. 7154230 4 Annuities and lottery at 3 per cent.

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€ 9154230 4 44 P.S. When Lord North had opened the Budget in the manner above stated, he acquainted the House, that he should, on a future day, communicate to them his majesty's message for a vote of credit for one million, to be applied to the future army extras, and loss on coinage.

* To the EDITOR of the LONDON MAGAZINE.

SIR, IN your Magazine for February and last month, you gave your readers

, self will think it proper to have Lord Stair's account inserted in your useful records, that the public may have the opportunity of comparing them together, and draw the necessary conclusions,

Budget.

Lord

1776.

251 Lord Stair's State of the National Debt, the National Income, and the National

Expenditure. THE funded debt at the conclusion of the war, including 7299375 value of long and life annuitie, given as preininas, and the 1000006 borrowed on the six-pence in the sound civil lift duty, likewise including the 6983553 funded in 1763, amounted to

£. 138402601 The unfunded debt (an equitable allowance being made for the excess of the extraordinaries in the two first years of the peace, beyond the average of the following years, which allowance amounting to 2000000 to a trife) being carried to the debt of the war, amounted to

8000000 Total debt at the conclusion of the war

146402601 The funded debt at Christmas'1773, including as above, was 134299375

The unfunded debt, exchequer bills 1000000, ditto lent to the East India company 1400000, navy debt 1886760, supposed debt of the civil lift 850000, in all

5086760

139386135

Debt at the conclusion of the war was
Debt at Christmas 177.3, was

146402601 139386135

7016466

Paid off therefore was

To the discharge of which have been applied the following extraneous and adventitious sums, which as they arose momy out of the war, ought to have been in a great part deducted from the debt incurred by the war Produce of French prizes

8155.00 Army savings

964755 Balance of Earl Chatham and John Calcraft's accounts and army savings

216222 Compofition for French prisoners

670000 Sale of ceded islands

700000 Froin the Eait India company, after deducting the 1400000 lent'them on the contract for territorial indeninification

800000 To have gained by the public which the company loft by the indemnity of one thilling per pounil on tea

90000 From the Bank for the renewal of their charter

II0000

4496477

4346477 To discount at io per cent on the 1500000 paid in the year 1772

150000 The debt therefore paid by the permanent excess of the incomes of the state beyond the current expences thereof duing eleven years of profound peace, and unequalled prospe rity of trade, with the land tax at 45. during five vears of the period, and during the rest of it at 3s, with lotteries every vear but two, the profits of which, though no certain or solid, far less an eligible resource, amountin- to 1200000 and upwards included, amounts to no more than

Annuity or interest payable at the conclusion of
the war on debt funded and unfunded, about 4900000

Ditto payable at Chriltmas 1773, about 4600000
Charge of intereft leffened

300090

2519989

The 252 Lord Stair's Observations on the State of ibe Nation. May The debt pretended to be paid in 1774 and 1775 does not exceed the debt contracted in these years, for which no provision was made.

PROOF. The debt paid off in 1774 and in 1775, was 1000000 3 per cents. in each year at 88 per cent. in both years 2000000 at 88

£. 7760000

per cent, make

200000

at least

Debt contracted in 1774 and 1775, for wbicb no provision was made. New exchequer bills

250000 Ordnance extraordinaries beyond what were granted in 1774 190423

As far as can be conjectured from the scrap of paper on the table of the House of Commons, the whole year 1775 is not near comprehended Aimy extraordinaries beyond what were granted in 1774

582628 Interest of unfunded debt and lottery expences for two years

Navy debt increased, exclusive of the 200000 granted towards 'paying it in 1774

811819 Total new debt contracted in

1774
and
1775

2034870 Debt paid off in 1774 and 1775

1760000 Debt contracted exceeds debt paid off

274870 Which is more than what was undertaken to be proved.

N. B. This is exclusive of 354735 taken towards the supplies 1775, by anticipation out of the last Christinas quarter of the sinking fund, but not chargeable particularly on 1774 and 1775, as the abuse hegan foon after the peace.

Notwithstanding these additions to the public debt, yet the East-India company (little used to profit by her servants crimes) having, as I am told, I believe with truth, been very unexpectedly enabled from the rapine, not the trade of the East, to discharge all, or at least a great part of the loin of 1400000 made to the company by the public, the national" debt at Christmas 1775 was probably something within the limits of one hundred and forty millions. But that auspicious epoch is now fled to return no more ; each frantic hour teems with precious impoffibilities, expenfive chimeras, baseless incoherencies : physical necesity, the avowed barrier of our supremacy, is formed on every side, and we are compelled to a fiert and believe, inat arinies su nenderly equipt that they scarce could march in a body one hundred miles through the country of a friend, are in one campaign to make the conquest of a great and warlike empire, where they cannot even arrive much before August. Let our miseries at least teach us bumility, let human pride fallen proitrate lick the duft : what is man? how little, how abject must he be in the eye of Providence? when the fate of nations hangs on the decision of coun. sels so wilful and so weak. O! guardian angel of the land avert thy people's fate; to 'thee I lift a hand guiltless of the wrongs, and unstained with the plunder of my country..

Sums levied on the British Subject in the Year 1774. To the creditors of the public and charges

£4445856 To charges on the old long and life annuities not stated in the exchequer paper, eftimated

8000 To the civil list

800000 To the duchy of Cornwall and Lancaster fines, principality of Wales, Scotch crown revenues, &c. &c. estimated To profits on the lottery

150000 To produce of the finking fund

2976382 To coinage duties

1 5000 Interest and management on the equivalent to Scotland

10600 To improvement of Scotch filheries and manufactures

200000

2000

8607838

of Chelter to Henry VI. against Taxation 253 To expences of management and collection on 86078381. estimated, one with the other, at 10 per cent. of the neat produce

860800 To fees and perquisites of office of every kind estimated

500000 To bounties on importation and exportation, whale and white herring fisheries, estimated

200000

To land and malt, land at 38.
Total levied on the subject within the year 1774

10168538 2250000

12418638

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To the EDITOR of the LONDON MAGAZINE.

SIR,
THE Americans claim an exemp- and beseechen your highness : where

tion from taxation by the British the said county is, and hath been a
parliament, because they are not re- county Palatine, as well before the
presented in that assembly. Waving conquest of England, as continually
The reasonableness of this claim, con- fince, distinct and separate from the
Gitent with natural justice and the crown of England; within which
principles of the English constitution : county, you, and all your noble pro.
í beg you will iniert the following genitors fithen it came into your
record, to thew the world that their hands, and all' rulers of the same,
demand is not unprecedented. It is before that time, have had your high
an application from the county courts of parliament to hold at your
palatine of Chester to the king, de. wills, your chancery, your exchequer,
precating the levying of taxes on your justice to hold pleas, as well of
them by the English parliament, be the crown, as of common pleas.
cause they were represented And by authority of which parlia-
therein, but bad a separate parlia. ment, to make or to admit laws
ment of their own : the king, sensible within the same, such as be thought
of the justice of their demand, grant- expedient and behovefuil for the weal
ed their petition. This record was of you, of the inheritors, and inheri.
prefixed to a book, entitled, “ The tance of the said county. And no in-
Administration of the Colonies,” writ. heritors or poflessioners within the
ten by Governor Pownall, and printed said county, be not chargeable, lyable,
in the year 1768. He was then the nor have not been bounden, charged,
friend of the colonies.

nor hurt, of their bodies, liberties,

0. franchises, land, goods, nor poffelCopy of a Supplication, exhibited to fions, within the same county (* but

King Henry VI. by the inhabi. by such laws as they] have agreed untants of the county Palatine of to. And for the more proof and Chester.

plain evidence of the said franchises, " To the KING, our Sovereign Lord. immunities, and freedoms; the most

victorious King William the conMOST Christian, benigne, and gra- queror, your most noble progenitor, cious king; we your humble subjects, gave the same county to Hugh Loup and true obaisant liege people, the his nephew, to hold as freely to him abbots, priors, and all the clergy; and to his heirs by the sword; as the your barons, knights, and esquires ; same king should hold all England by and all the commonalty of your coun

the crown. Experience of which ty Palatine of Chester, meekly prayen grant, to be so in all appeals and re

cords, The above is a literal transcript of the record as published by Daniel King. I bave not tbe means of consulting ibe original, there is certainly some omision or default in the copy. I have inseried the words, but by such laws as they, printed 'between books. I see no other way of making sense of it. I have also in the same manner, between books, inserted the words be wrong.

4

A. D. 1450

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