Hydrostatical and Pneumatical Lectures

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J. Bentham, 1747 - Air - 289 pages
 

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Page 234 - Eflex, rifes and fwells by the meeting of the two contrary tides of flood, whereof the one comes from the SW along the channel of England, and the other from the north, and on the contrary...
Page 230 - The greater height of the barometer is occafioncd by two contrary winds blowing towards the place of obfervation, whereby the air of other places is brought thither and accumulated ; fo that the incumbent cylinder of air being...
Page 231 - ... and confequently the mercury muft ftand high, as often as thefe winds blow. This holds true in this country, but is not a general...
Page 228 - That in ferene, good, fettled weather, the mercury is generally high. " 3. That upon very great winds, though they be not accompanied with rain, the mercury finks lowed of all, with relation to the point of the compafs the wind blows upon.
Page 229 - The mercury's being low inclines it to rain, becaufe the air being light, the vapours are no longer fupported thereby, being become fpecifically heavier than the medium wherein they floated ; fo that they defcend towards the earth, and, in their fall, meeting with other aqueous particles, they incorporate together, and form little drops...
Page 233 - But those that shall consider how, when once an impetus is given to a fluid body, it is capable of mounting above its level, and checking others that have a contrary tendency to...
Page 230 - Va" pours are better kept fufpended, fo that they " have no Inclination to precipitate and fall " down in Drops, which is the Reafon of the " ferene good Weather which attends the " greater Heights of the Mercury. " 3. The Mercury finks the loweft of all by " the very rapid Motion of the Air in Storms

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