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Houghton Mifflin, 1904

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Page 161 - If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes' palaces. It is a good divine that follows his own instructions. I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done than be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.
Page 255 - O ! wonder ! How many goodly creatures are there here ! How beauteous mankind is ! O brave new world, That has such people in't ! Pro. Tis new to thee.
Page 143 - The Shepherd in Virgil, grew at last acquainted with Love, and found him a native of the rocks. 'Is not a patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and when he has reached ground encumbers him with help?
Page 19 - It is therefore ordered, That every township in this jurisdiction, after the Lord hath increased them to the number of fifty householders, shall then forthwith appoint one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him to write and read...
Page 19 - ... to the end that learning may not be buried in the graves of our forefathers in church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors.
Page 279 - Lifting himself out of the lowly dust On golden plumes up to the purest skie...
Page 299 - And is there care in Heaven ? and is there love In heavenly spirits to these creatures base, That may compassion of their evils move ? There is...
Page 308 - Another Damzell, as a precious gemme Amidst a ring most richly well enchaced, That with her goodly presence all the rest much graced.
Page 263 - That same framing of his style to an old rustic language I dare not allow, since neither Theocritus in Greek, Virgil in Latin, nor Sannazzaro in Italian did affect it.
Page 320 - There is something in Spenser that pleases one as strongly in old age as it did in one's youth. I read the Faerie Queene, when I was about twelve, with infinite delight; and I think it gave me as much, when I read it over about a year or two ago."— Spence's Anecdotes.

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