A Popular History of England: From the Earliest Times to the Accession of Victoria, Volume 4

Front Cover
D. Estes and C. E. Lauriat, 1876 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 299 - This is the road that all heroes have trod before him. He is traduced and abused for his supposed motives. He will remember that obloquy is a necessary ingredient in the composition of all true glory ; he will remember that it was not only in the Roman customs, but it is in the nature and constitution of things, that calumny and abuse are essential parts of triumph.
Page 247 - That God and nature put into our hands !" I know not what ideas that lord may entertain of God and nature, but I know that such, abominable principles are equally abhorrent to religion and humanity. What ! to attribute the sacred sanction of God and nature to the massacres of the Indian scalping-knife — to the cannibal savage, torturing, murdering...
Page 246 - But yesterday, and England might have stood against the world ; now, none so poor to do her reverence...
Page 351 - Forty years long was I grieved with this generation, and said : It is a people that do err in their hearts, for they have not known my ways.
Page 268 - Britain her empire on the ocean — her boasted grand and substantial superiority, which made the world bend before her ! Oh inestimable rights, that have taken from us our rank among nations, our importance abroad, and our happiness at home...
Page 230 - ... patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans, whigs and tories, treacherous friends and open enemies, — that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 247 - My lords, we are called upon as members of this House, as men, as Christian men, to protest against such notions standing near the Throne, polluting the ear of majesty. "That God and nature put into our hands!
Page 283 - I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the separation; but the separation having been made, and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power.
Page 230 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic; such a tesselated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white...
Page 250 - Nothing short of independence, it appears to me, can possibly do. A peace on other terms would, if I may be allowed the expression, be a peace of war. The injuries we have received from the British nation were so unprovoked, and have been so great and so many, that they can never be forgotten.

Bibliographic information