Fleetwood: Or, The New Man of Feeling, Volume 2

Front Cover
R. Phillips, 1805

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 73 - It is better to go to the house of mourning, than to go to the house of feasting: for that is the end of all men ; and the living will lay it to his heart. Sorrow is better than laughter: for by the sadness of the countenance the heart is made better.
Page 196 - I hear people talk of the raptures of solitude; and with what tenderness of affection they can love a tree, a rivulet, or a mountain. Believe me, they are pretenders; they deceive themselves, or they seek, with their eyes open, to impose upon others. In addition to their trees and their mountains, I will give them the whole brute creation; still it will not do. There is a principle in the heart of man which demands the society of his like.
Page 12 - Vol. III. p. 341. But in page 12, vol. ii. there is a very improper passage upon this most sacred of all subjects: "The offerings of gold, frankincense and myrrh, presented by the wise men of the East, were not more acceptable to the mother of Jesus, than this homely roll and butter were to me at this moment.
Page 90 - God it were in my power to recai a few past months! — No matter! — My prospects and my pleasures are finished; my life is tarnished; my — peace is destroyed: — I shall never again think of myself with approbation, or with patience!
Page 49 - Ruffigny,' continued your grandfather, 'what miserably narrow notions are these which you seem to have fostered in your bosom! Are all the kindnesses of the human heart to be shut up within the paltry limits of consanguinity? My son will have enough; and I am sure he will not repine, that you should be made a partaker of the opulence with which Providence has blessed me. If you will, we will ask him, and I will do nothing for you that has not his entire and undissembled approbation. Why should I...
Page 111 - ... from author to author in wide succession, and took away the oppressive feelings of passiveness which frequently pursue us, when we resign ourselves to the simple and direct reading of a single work.
Page 197 - ... their eyes open, to impose upon others. In addition to their trees and their mountains, I will give them the whole brute creation; still it will not do. There is a principle in the heart of man which demands the society of his like. He that has no such society, is in a state but one degree removed from insanity. He pines for an ear into which he might pour the story of his thoughts; for an eye that shall flash upon him with responsive intelligence; for a face, the lines of which shall talk to...
Page 276 - I might, perhaps, sometimes be presumptuous enough to estimate his discernment at no higher a rate than my own; but the case is otherwise now. Mistake me not, my dear Fleetwood. I am not idle and thoughtless enough, to promise to sink my being and individuality in yours. I shall have my distinct propensities and preferences. Nature has moulded my mind in a particular way; and I have, of course, my tastes, my pleasures, and my wishes, more or less different from those of every other human being. I...
Page 141 - I had many; friends who found pleasure in my conversation, who were convinced of the integrity of my principles of conduct, and who would have trusted me in the most important concerns. But what sort of a friend is it whose kindness shall produce a conviction in my mind that I do not stand alone in the world? This must be a friend, who is to me as another self, who joys in all my joys, and grieves in all my sorrows, not with a joy or grief that looks like compliment, not with a sympathy that changes...
Page 287 - The difference of sex powerfully assists the intimacy ; similarity of character can never unite two parties so closely, as the contrast of masculine enterprise in one, and a defenceless tenderness in the other.

Bibliographic information