The British Prose Writers, Volume 22

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Page 131 - ... of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world: all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power: both angels and men, and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 29 - Where the great sun begins his state, Robed in flames and amber light, The clouds in thousand liveries dight ; While the ploughman, near at hand, Whistles o'er the furrow'd land, And the milkmaid singeth blithe, And the mower whets his scythe, And every shepherd tells his tale, Under the hawthorn in the dale.
Page 55 - Six hours in sleep, in law's grave study six. Four spend in prayer— the rest on nature fix. Rather. Six hours to law, to soothing slumber seven, Ten to the world allot, and 'all to heaven.
Page 29 - ... out in the morning, in company with a friend, to visit a place, where Milton spent some part of his life, and where, in all probability, he composed several of his earliest productions. It is a small village, situated on a pleasant...
Page 170 - I have carefully and regularly perused these Holy Scriptures, and am of opinion, that the volume, independently of its divine origin, contains more sublimity, purer morality, more important history, and finer strains of eloquence, than can be collected from all other books, in whatever language they may have been written.
Page 29 - Straight mine eye hath caught new pleasures Whilst the landscape round it measures; Russet lawns, and fallows gray, Where the nibbling flocks do stray; Mountains, on whose barren breast The laboring clouds do often rest; Meadows trim with daisies pied, Shallow brooks, and rivers wide ; Towers and battlements it sees Bosomed high in tufted trees, Where perhaps some beauty lies, The cynosure of neighboring eyes ; Hard by, a cottage chimney smokes, From betwixt two aged oaks...
Page 135 - Many learned investigators of antiquity are fully persuaded, that a very old and almost primaeval language was in use among these northern nations, from which not only the Celtic dialects, but even the Greek and Latin are derived...
Page 121 - I GIVE you many thanks for your most obliging and valuable present; and feel myself extremely honoured by this mark of your friendship. My first leisure will be employed in .an attentive perusal of an author, who had merit enough to fill up a part of yours, and whom you have made accessible to me with an ease and advantage, which one so many years disused to Greek literature as I have been, could not otherwise have.
Page 173 - Before thy mystic altar, heavenly truth, I kneel in manhood, as I knelt in youth. Thus let me kneel, till this dull form decay, And life's last shade be brightened by thy ray. Then shall my soul, now lost in clouds below, Soar without bound, without consuming glow.
Page 174 - Here was deposited, the mortal part of a man, who feared GOD, but not death; and maintained independence, but sought not riches; who thought none below him, but the base and unjust, none above him, but the wise and virtuous...

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