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Books Books 1 - 10 of 33 on In these two things, viz., an equal indifferency for all truth (I mean the receiving....
" In these two things, viz., an equal indifferency for all truth (I mean the receiving it in the love of it as truth, but not loving it for any other reason before we know it to be true) and in the examination of our principles and not receiving any for... "
Political Portraits in this New Era: With Explanatory Notes, Historical and ... - Page 375
by William Playfair - 1814
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Posthumous Works of Mr. John Locke ...

John Locke - Commonplace-books - 1706 - 336 pages
...their Solidity, Truth and Certainty, confifts that Freedom of the Underftanding. which is neceffary to a rational Creature, and without which it is not truly an Underftanding. Tis Conceit, Phanfy, Extravagance, any thing rather than Underftanding, if it muft be...
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THE WORKS OF JOHN LOCKE

J. JOHNSON - 1801
...and in the examination of our principles, and not receiving any for such, nor building on them, till we are fully convinced, as rational creatures, of...is conceit, fancy, extravagance, any thing rather P2 " than than understanding, if it must be under the constraint of receiving and holding opinions...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the ..., Volumes 1-3

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1801
...their folidity, truth and certainty, confiils that freedom of the underftanding which is neccffary to a rational creature, and without which it is not truly an underftanding. It is conceit, fancy, extravagance, any thing rather than underftanding, if it mult...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of ...

John Locke - 1801 - 308 pages
...their folidity, truth and certainty, confifls that freedom of the underilanding which is neceffary to a rational .creature, and without which it is not truly an underilanding. It is conceit, fancy, extravagance, any thing rather than understanding, if it mult...
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Philosophical beauties selected from the works of John Locke

John Locke - 1802
...rational creatures, of their solidity, truth, and certainty, consist* that freedom, of the undersJanding which is necessary to a rational creature, and without...extravagance, any thing rather than understanding, if it mu.fi be under the constraint of receiving and holding opinions by the authority of any thing but their...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 2

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1805 - 510 pages
...convinced, as rational creatures, of their solidity, truth, and certainty ; consists that freedom pf the understanding which is necessary to a rational...conceit, fancy, extravagance, any thing rather than 348 Conduct of the Understanding. than understanding, if it must be under the constraint of receiving...
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An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now added, i. Analysis ...

John Locke - 1816
...certainty; consists that freedom of the understanding which is necessary to a rational croa• tu re, and without which it is not truly an understanding. It is conceit, fancy, < xtravaguncc, any thing rather than understanding, if it must be under the constraint oT receiving...
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Essay concerning human understanding (concluded) Defence of Mr. Locke's ...

John Locke - 1824
...and in the examination of our principles, and not receiving any for such, nor building on them, till we are fully convinced, as rational creatures, of...understanding. It is conceit, fancy, extravagance, any thing'rather 348 Conduct of the Understanding. than understanding, if it must be under the constraint...
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Discourses on Truth: Delivered in the Chapel of the South Carolina College

James Henley Thornwell - Truth - 1855 - 328 pages
...we are fully convinced, as rational creatures, of their solidity, truth and certainty, consists the freedom of the understanding, which is necessary to...and without which it is not truly an understanding." We are not to confound the indifference of which Locke here speaks as to what is true, previous to...
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The A, B, C, of thought:consciousness the standard of truth

William George Davies - 1861
...thereof." — Bacon, ' Novutn Organum.' " In these two things, viz., an equal indiffereney for all truth (I mean the receiving it in the love of it as truth,...and without which it is not truly an understanding." — Locke, 'The Conduct of the Understanding.' CHAPTEE I. PRELIMITTARY REMARKS. The Meaning attached...
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