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ment for the scholar, and of profitable instruction to those who read but little. The character given of it when first published, in the Evangelical Review, was as follows. “ This work is “well calculated for young persons, and may prove in many

cases, a very acceptable present to them, as it conveys much “instruction, mingled with entertainment. It will also serve

for a pleasing companion to the traveller in the chaise or the “ stage coach. In short, it affords a copious fund of rational

amusement for a leisure hour. We have no doubt but it "will obtain, as it certainly merits, an extensive circulation."

ASHBEL GREEN. Philadelphia, Aug. 3d, 1831.

66

AUTHOR'S PREFACE.

To inform the mind, affect the heart, and promote the best interests of mankind, must ever be considered as a pleasing and honourable employ. Various means, indeed, may be made use of in order to accomplish these ends. Some do good by wise and judicious conversation : others by constant and laborious teaching; and many by an excellent and uniform character. The Compiler of these volumes has here attempted to contribute something towards so good and desirable a work.

It need not be observed, that men are naturally indifferent about their duty to God, and unconcerned as to the welfare of their immortal souls. Any attempt, therefore, to set before them the grand object of veneration and worship, to rouse them to duty, to facilitate their happiness, to show them the deformity of vice, and to inspire them with true and exalted views of the sacred Religion of Jesus, cannot, I think, be considered as unworthy of attention. How far this Work will conduce to these ends, must be left to the judgment of the Reader.

Volumes of Anecdotes have already been presented to the public under various titles; but none that I know of which have been more particularly selected as religious, and more immediately calculated to lead men to genuine devotion and solid piety. It is to be lamented, that while many write merely to amuse the imagination, the real profit of the mind is not thought of. The passions, perhaps, are affected, and the fancy pleased, while the temper remains unsubdued, the heart unimpressed, and the conduct unstable and irregular. Now, without incurring the charge of egotism, I hope the present Work, while it affords a degree of entertainment to the Reader, will also tend to excite reverence for the best of Beings ; a regard for the noble and delightful system of Christianity ; together with benevolence to our fellow mortals, and an earnest desire to devote ourselves to the glory and service of our God and Saviour.

The Reader will evidently see that novelty has not been so much design as utility. If any object, however, to the Work on this account, only say in reply, that Anecdotes cannot be made. In writing on any system, invention may be displayed, and the ideas of the author may bear the air of novelty : but in a Work of this kind, we must confine ourselves to our materials. I own it is not difficult to find, now and then, an original Anecdote ; but, in this age of writing and publishing, it would be very difficult indeed to find a volume of them, since almost every thing of importance is speedily conveyed to the press for the public benefit. We must, therefore, take them as we find them, and make the best improvement of them we can.

I am conscious that every Anecdote will not strike the mind of the Reader with equal importance : nor can it be expected, that, in a selection of some hundreds, it should be so. Besides, men are of different tastes ; they form different views, and are situated in different circumstances : each one, therefore, will judge favourably of that which is most congenial to his own ideas. The compiler, however, deprecates the severity of the critic, and hopes that

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candour will perform the office of a kind friend, who is more disposed to pardon than to indulge a spirit of invective. In respect to authenticity, which is of considerable importance in a work of this kind, I have carefully avoided what appeared to be apocryphal, and bore but scrupulous evidence ; yet, after all

, if any thing should be found of this kind, (which I am ignorant of, if there be,) still its moral or use will be found beneficial, pointing the Reader to view religion and morality as worthy of his sincere regard and constant pursuit.

To conclude: if any good be done, any mind instructed, any comfort derived ; if love to men, gratitude to our adorable Redeemer, and a firm adherence to the truth, be excited or promoted by this selection, it will abundantly compensate the little labour and feeble efforts of the Compiler.

C. B.

INDEX TO VOL. I.

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ABBOT, Archb'p, 41, 48 Bacon, Lord, 18, 186, Boyle, Mr. 95
Abney, Sir T. 72 Bacon the artist, for- Boyse,

70
Action of preachers, 79
bearance of, 155 Bradford,

159
Adams, Ebenezer, 5 Baily, Mr. 120 Brewer, Rev. Mr. 49,
Addison,30,33, 113, 116 Baratiere,

73

84, 115
honesty of, 175 Barrington, Bish- Breakspear, 118
Adrian VI. 86, 119 op, liberality of 10 Brindly,

108
Affection, filial, 45 Baxter, Mr. 9, 82 Brown, Simon,

179
parental 66 Bede,

103 Brown, Mr. J. 24
Afflictions,

5 Benedict XII. 22 Bruce, death of, 30
Agathocles, 177 Beneficence, instan- Brutus,

91
Agesilaus, 67, ob. ces of,

8 Budæus, wife of, 151
servation of, 144 Bentivoglio, 70 | Buffon,

40
Alcibiades, 85, 91 Berridge, Mr. 25, 75, Burnet, Bp. 13, 75, 77,
Alexander the Great, 36

84

82, 173
91, 147.

Berkley, Bishop, 50 Burford, Countess
Alleine, Joseph, 121 Betterton, Mr. 79 of,

169
Alphonso V. See Beveridge, . 61, 196 Burgess, Mr. 147
Flattery.

Beza,

30 Burkitt, Mr. 154
Alphonsus, 147 Bible valued, 123 Butler's Analogy, · 91
Ambrose, Mr. . 31, 93

best book, 125 Buxton, Jedediah,
Anachonis,
37 resolution to memory of,

65
Anaxarchus, 156 burn it defeated, . 125
Andrews, Bishop, · 48 Bigotry,

125 CESAR, Julius, .. 153
Anger,

153 Bilney, Mr. forti- benevolence of, 8
Animals, cruelty to, 133

tude of,

158 example of, 45
Antipater, 165 Bishops,

12 Calamy, Dr. 82
Antoninus, Empe- Blacklock,

14 Calculation of the
ror,

153 Blackwall, Mr. 49 inhabitants of the
Apparel. See Dress. Blind, Blindness, 14 globe,

28
Aristides,
43 Blount,

137 of inhabitants,
Aristippus and Æs Boerhaave, 53, 71, 106, &c. of London 62
chines,
177
107, 115 Caligula,

43, 58
Ascham, quotation Bogue, Mr. quota- Cambyses, envy of, 43
from
144 tion from, 135 Candiac,

73
Askew, Mrs. con- Boisi De,

70 Canute,

47
stancy of,
128 Bonosus,

36 Capuchins, burying
Atheist convinced, 122 Books, borrowing, 91 place of,

15
Atheist's creed, 122 'what ought Cards

16
Athenagoras, 143 to be proscribed, 145 Caroline, Queen, 54
Athenian laws, 145 Bougier,constancy of128

82, 92
Augustine, (106, 177 Bourbon, Prince of, 179 Catechising, 17
Augustus Cæsar,35,147 | Bowles, Mr. forbear- Caviller reproved, . 127
Avarice,

i 6 ance of, 155 Charles V. 93, 109, 119,
Aylmer, Bishop; . 104 Boyle, R. 86, 101 |

173, 189

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43, 52

Charles I. flattered, 48 Cyril,

121 | Elizabeth, Queen, 100,
Charles IX. cruelty Czar' of Muscovy, 54

149
and death of, . 131

Elwes, avarice of, . 6
Charity, instance DANCER, D. ava-

Eminent persons
of,

8
rice of,

7 raised from low
Chesterfield, Lord, 18 D'Alembert, 137 situations, 41
Cheyne, Dr. 53 Daniel, Mrs.death of, 32 Empty church, the, 146
Cheynel, Dr. bigot-

Deaf woman a con- Encouragement to

126 stant attendant, 169 preachers, 83
Children prohibited Death,

28 Envy,.

43
from cruelty,

133

contempt of, 156 Epaminondas, 46, 187
Chilo,

201 Deaths, happy, 30 Epictetus, saying of, 153
Chillingworth’s re-
remarkable, 31 Equity,

186
ligion of the pro-
De Bayard, 157 Eternity,

43
testants, anecdote Deering, Sir C. 39 Euclid's Elements, 91
127 Deism, Deists, 135 Evans, Dr.

27
Christianity, 17 Deliberation, 33 Example,

45
Cicero quoted, 173 Demosthenes, 106 Exercise,

109
Cineas,

118 Diagora's three sons, 201
Civility,

19 Dieneces, saying of, 156 Faith, 57, the far-
Clark, Rev. Mr.
156 Diffidence,

33
mer's,

147
Clergymen, disso-

Dioclesian,

119 implicit, 181
lute, reclaimed, 140 Diogenes, 116 Faithful preachers, 80
Clement VII. 87 Dionysius, the ty. Family expositor,
Cochlan, Rev. Mr. 57 rant,

the,

146
Coke, Sir Edward, 35 Discontent, 139 Farmers, the pious, 146
Cole, Dr.
87 Disguised and dis- Fashion,

147
Collins, Mr. 99, 138 solute clergymen

Fearful turned cou-
Commodus, cruelty reclaimed, 140

rageous,

169
of,
130 Disputation, 33 Feasting,

164
Comprehension bill, 190 Doctrines of grace, 18 Females, learned, · 148
Conder, Dr. robbe- Dodd, Mr. J. 17

industri-
171 Doddridge, Dr. 23, 41, ous,

150
Conscience,
20

79, 178

useful, 151
Conscientious judge, 22 Donne, Dr.

62

advice to, 152
Constantine, 28 Doubts removed, 143 Fenelone, Archb’p, 23,45
Constancy,

128 Dress, 35, 147 Fielding, Justice,
Contentment, 22 Drunkenness, 36 singular remark
Conversation, 24 Drunkard confound- of,

145
Conversing
25 ed,

37 Fienus, quotation
Converted
innkeep-
-recovered, 37 from,

179
er,
129 Duels,

37 Filial affection, 45
Conyers
, Dr. 33, 122 Duellist alarmed, · 144 Flattery,

47
Cornaro,

116 Dwight, Dr. dis- Flavel, Mr. 27
Cranmer, Archbish-

courses on infi-

Fletcher, Rev. Mr. 177
ор,

delity,
138 Fool's reproof,

153
Crichton,
62

Forbearance,

153
Croke, Judge, wife

EARLY rising,
40 Fortitude,

156
of,
151 Education, 144 Forwardness,

48
Cromwell, T. 166 Edward III. 153, Francis I.

69
Cruelty,

130

queen of, 151 Frederic II. 19, 40
Cunitz, Mary, learn- Edward VI. anec- Frederic the Great, 172
ing of,
149

123 Frescobald, 166
Curate relieved, 134 Edgerton, Chancel- Friar and night
Custom,

134
lor,
186) whisper, .

163

ry of,

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114, 160

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