An Historical and Critical Review of the Civil Wars in Ireland: From the Reign of Queen Elizabeth to the Settlement Under King William. : With the State of the Irish Catholics, from that Settlement to the Relaxation of the Popery Laws, in the Year 1778. Extracted from Parliamentary Records, State Acts, and Other Authentic Materials

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R. Conolly, 1810 - Catholic emancipation - 660 pages

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Contents

Lord Wentworths manner of modelling the Irish parlia
105
A convocation of the clergy of Ireland
119
The court of wards and high commission in Ireland
135
The catholic clergy of Ireland unjustly accused of stirring
149
BOOK V
159
ay The original depositions now in the possession of the
174
V The original examinations further considered
177
Concerning the number of murders
178
The humanity of the chiefs of the insurgents
181
Vili The conduct of the catholic clergy during the insurrection
189
The first cause of the insurrections increasing
192
The same subject continued
194
Further misconduct of the lords justices
197
The nobility and gentry of the pale banished from Dublin
200
The justices invite the lords of the pale to a conference
201
The gentlemen of the pale assemble at Swords
204
XV The lords justices violate the public faith
205
The order for a general pardon limited by the justices
207
Lords justices orders concerning Roman catholic priests
211
The cause of the insurrection in Munster
213
The cause of the insurrection in Connaught 217
219
Further severities of the lords justices
220
The gentlemen of the pale petition the king and parlia ment
222
Barbarous orders of the lords justices and council to the earl of Ormond
225
Orders of the English parliament relative to Ireland
227
BOOK VI
229
174
232
The king consents to hear the grievances of the insur gents 293
233
Another contrivance of the justices to hinder the cessation
235
Sir William Parsons displaced from the government
239
His majestys commissioners meet those of the confederate catholics to treat of the cessation
241
The cessation at last concluded
243
PAGL 271
245
The advantages of the cessation to his majestys army
246
The cessation violated by his majestys forces in Ulster
248
The covenant brought into Ireland further breaches of the cessation by the Scotch and English forces
250
The revolt of lord Inchiquin
253
The confederates send supplies to the king
255
The confederates press the marquis of Ormond to take the command of their forces
260
Xin The king sends Ormond a commission to conclude a peace with the confederates
263
The treaty of peace adjourned
265
The earl of Clanrickard expostulates with Ormond upon his last answer to the confederates commissioners
268
The earl of Glamorgan arrives in Ireland
274
58
275
Glamorgan now freed from his confinement treats with the Nuncio Renuncini Ormonds opinion of that pro ceeding
279
Peace concluded with the marquis of Ormond
283
The conclusion of the peace too long deferred
286
BOOK VII
288
Lord Clanrickard expostulates with the marquis of Ormond on his refusal to join the confederates and to proclaim sir Charles Coote a rebel
290
The king is prevailed on by the Scots to forbid Ormond to proceed in the peace with the confederates
293
Lord Digby arrives in Dublin and causes the peace with the confederates to be proclaimed
296
Lord Digby insists on the proclaiming of the peace
298
Owen ONial and the Nuncio reject the peace
300
The bad effects of the clergys proceedings
303
The marquis of Ormond goes to Kilkenny but returns suddenly to Dublin
305
The marquis of Ormond pursues his treaty with the cove nanters in Ulster
307
A new general assembly and council
309
The Nuncio ONial and Prescon advance towards Dublin with a considerable army
313
The sentiments of the catholic clergy of Dublin on this occasion
315
The marquis of Ormond proceeds in his treaty with the parliament
316
Clanrickards engagement with Preston
318
Ormond consents to the engagement
320
Ormond resumes his treaty with the English parliament
324
Ormond delivers up the kings authority to the English parliament
326
The marquis of Ormond ordered to leave the castle
330
Reasons assigned for the marquis of Ormonds surrender considered
333
Ormond prepares to leave the kingdom Is pressed by the confederates to remain a while in it but refuses
338
CEAI PAGE BOOK VIII
341
His excellency treats of a peace with the confederate ca tholics 943
343
The peace of 1648 concluded and proclaimed
345
The happy effects of this peace Ormonds defeat at Rath mines Cromwells arrival in Ireland
347
Cromwells policy to reduce Ireland
350
Owen ONial submits to the peace Inchiquins forces revolt to the rebels
353
313
355
The marquis of Ormond desires leave to quit the kingdom
358
The total defection of the protestant forces
376
Treaty with the duke of Lorrain 977
377
XXXVII The treaty with the duke of Lorrain considered
380
The marquis of Clanrickard leaves Ireland now entirely subject to the English rebels
386
The transplantation of the Irish into Connaught
388
High courts of justice in Ireland 992
391
Henry Cromwells administration in Ireland
398
Contrivances of sir Charles Coote and lord Broghill
401
siga
403
The Irish catholics excluded out of the general act of obli vion
404
A proclamation published against the Irish
405
The Irish parliament
406
68
408
False reports of a conspiracy against the Irish considered The effects of these reports
410
The parties principally suspected of this conspiracy volun tarily appear before the lords justices in order to detect the ſorgery
412
Loalty of the catholic nobility and gentry of Ireland at this juncture
413
CHAP PAGE XIII The Irish clergys remonstrance of loyalty
416
The duke of Ormonds design in permitting this meeting of the Irish clergy
419
The king confesses his obligation to make good the peace of the year 1648
421
Ormonds reasons for his opposition to the Irish considered
422
The earl of Orrery abuses the kings confidence with re spect to the settlement of Ireland
424
The affairs of Ireland brought before the English council
426
The sufferings of the Irish set forth by their ageots before the king and council
428
320
432
The conditions of the innocency and nocency of the claim ants
435
The time limited for holding these courts found too short and not suffered to be enlarged
436
An enlargement of time for hearing all the claimants by whom hindered
439
Some reflections on the foregoing acts
443
XXV A dangerous conspiracy of the puritans 416
446
The duke of Ormond apologizes for the favour he had shewn to the Cromwellian party in Ireland
448
The probable motives of the duke of Ormonds past and present conduct with respect to the Irish
450
The duke of Ormond befriends the Irish
453
BOOK X
459
The same subject continued in general
461
Particular facts related in Archbishop Kings book proved false concerning popish judges and juries
462
326
465
The behaviour of the Irish priests and new recruits under King James impartially considered
469
The conduct of the Irish and English army compared
471
74
478
The disarming of the protestants further considered
482
General De Rosens cruelty before Derry considered
483
XII King James countermands De Rosens order
487
XIII The protestants of Ireland were not deprived of their churches by King James as Dr King sets forth
491
cha? PAGE XIV King Williams treatment of the episcopal clergy in Scotland compared with King Jamess behaviour towards the protestant clergy in ...
494
The true cause of the decline of the protestant religion in Ireland in the reign of King James II
496
The perplexity of the established clergy of Ireland after the coronation of King William
498
The established clergy of Ireland laboured under a particu lar difficulty on this occasion
500
The good faith of King Williams and King Jamess officers compared
501
A short sketch of the cruelties inflicted on the Irish prisoners in this war and also on those even under protection
506
Surrender of Limerick with the articles of capitulation
509
Infringement of the articles of Limerick
526
Severe laws made against catholics
528
The catholics of Limerick cruelly treated
531
Penal laws to prevent the further growth of popery
533
The same subject continued
536
Persecution of the catholics in the reign of Q Anne
541
Penal laws of discovery and gavelkind enacted
544
Reasons assigned for making those laws
546
Persecution in the reign of King George J
548
The catholics address his majesty King George II
551
Penal laws enforced in the reign of King George II
552
The conduct of the catholics of Ireland in the time of the rebellion in Scotland 1745
556
A bill for nuturalizing the Jews passes the house of commons
558
The catholics address the lord lieutenant
559
The catholics of Ireland pressed by penal laws form an humble remonstrance to be presented to his majesty
560
Tumults in Munster considered
568
Reflections on the foregoing subject
575
Some prospect of mitigating the rigour of the popery laws
579
APPENDIX No I A brief declaration of the government of Irclandby captain Thomas Lee 1594
587
Remonstrance of divers Lords of the pale to the king con cerning the Irish parliament in 1613 60
609
84
631
To the kingThe humble Remonstrance of the Roman
642
The several arguments of sir Theobald Butler counsellor
651
xyļi The coronation oath of James
660
330

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Page 514 - The Roman catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland, or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles II...
Page 515 - ... provided also, that no person whatsoever shall have or enjoy the benefit of this article, that shall neglect or refuse to take the oath of allegiance,* made by act of parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their present majesties, when thereunto required.
Page 517 - ... creditors, at the instance of the Lord Lucan, and the rest 'of the persons aforesaid, it is agreed, that the said Lords Justices, and the said Baron De Ginckle, shall intercede with the King and parliament, to have the estates secured to Roman Catholics, by articles and capitulation in this kingdom, charged with, and equally liable to the payment of so much of the said debts, as the said Lord Lucan, upon stating accounts with the said John Brown, shall certify under his hand, that the effects...
Page 517 - Tyrconnel and Lord Lucan, took away the effects the said John Brown had to answer the said debts, and promised to clear the said John Brown of the said debts, which effects were...
Page 518 - And all such as are under their protection in the said counties," hereby for us, our heirs and successors, ordaining and declaring, that all and every person and persons therein concerned, shall and may have, receive, and enjoy the benefit thereof, in such and the same manner, as if the said words had been inserted in their proper place, in the said second article ; any omission, defect, or mistake in the said second article, in any wise notwithstanding.
Page 529 - Whilst this restraint of foreign and domestic education was part of an horrible and impious system of servitude, the members were well fitted to the body. To render men patient under a deprivation of all the rights of human nature, everything which could give them a knowledge or feeling of those rights was rationally forbidden. To render humanity fit to be insulted, it was fit that it should be degraded.
Page 42 - And no spectacle was more frequent in the ditches of towns, and especially in wasted countries, than to see multitudes of these poor people dead with their mouths all coloured green by eating nettles, docks, and all things they could rend up above ground.
Page 518 - ... or one of them, did promise that the said clause should be made good, it being within the intention of the capitulation, and inserted in the foul draft thereof.
Page 25 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...

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