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JAMAICA PLANTERS Ta league between adulterous planters and tem- | dividuals refused to serve with him, &c. &c.

porising churchmen; the former consistently The following is the reason assigned by the VERSUS

opposing the truth, the latter seeking ease, Cornwall Chronicle of February 18:- We CHRISTIANITY.

and friendship of the world. When will his understand that his (Mr. Roby's) manifesting

lordship shake off the trammels of worldly so decided a regard for the Baptists, in beIn what degree it is allowable, and in what policy, and stand forth in the name and in coming their security, and in intermeddling degree it is criminal, to instruct the Jamaica | the strength of his Master ? His voice raised with the affair of the meeting-house (i. e bondsmen, may be learnt from the following against the proprietors' criminal neglect of lodging information concerning the destruccommunication to the Editor of the Christian their slaves would be heard and listened to, tion of the chapel), has rendered this gentleRecord, a monthly publication issued in Kings- and some hope might then be entertained of man so obnoxious to the public.' ton, Jamaica, under the superintendance of rescuing the soul of the slave from spiritual | “Mr. J. L. Lewin, of Montego Bay, from Members of the Church of England.

thraldom; but, if his lordship thus continue his activity in behalf of the missionaries, has “I happened to be present, the other day, 1 silent, how great is his responsibility!'

been subjected to the bitterest malice of their, at a conversation which took place at the house “The following instances will show that and now his own, enemies. They have interof an attorney in my neighbourhood, on the even individuals of great respectability in the fered between him and his co-partner in busiquestion whether or not a clergyman, who had community have not escaped the malice of ness, Mr. Heron, and have even succeeded in been lately appointed to a district of the parish, persecutors, when they have ventured to inter-compassing a dissolution of the connexion. should be permitted to instruct the slaves on fere in the behalf of the missionaries. Mr. “Mr. Lawrence Hill, of Montego Bay, has the estates in that district! It was the una- Roby, Collector of his Majesty's Customs at been dismissed from his employment for advonimous opinion of the planters present that Montego Bay, was repeatedly subjected to cating the cause of the missionaries; and methe said clergyman ought not, on any account, gross insult. On one occasion he was hung dical men have actually refused to attend his to be admitted on the estates. Why? Be

in effigy. On the formation of a conservative family in sickness!” CAUSE HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE CHURCH corps for the defence of the town, several in- ! MISSIONARY Society! There was nothing against the individual himself.' This was admitted in so many words; but his connexion with that Society was deemed a sufficient reason for depriving the slaves of the means of instruction which he was appointed to afford them, and for keeping them bound down in the chains of spiritual darkness! What an awful responsibility lies on the souls of proprietors who thus deliver up the spiritual welfare of their slaves to the dictation of abandoned men! In this manner, and for these causes, the slaves are deprived of the instruction and consolations of the ministers of the established church. From the inadequate size of the chapels, and from the want of time allowed them, They can scarcely attend the public ministry; and they have been threatened by proprietors, attorneys, and overseers—aye, by magistrates ! —with the utmost severity of punishment, if they shall be detected in attendance at a 'Sectarian' place of worship. How, then, are the unfortunate creatures to obtain spiritual nourishment for their famishing souls? Whom

NORTH GATE, YARMOUTH. will these planters permit to give them instruction? The Bishop's Catechist.' He, and he alone, is to be admitted; and the cause of his THE DROMEDARY DRIVER.

ABBOTSFORD. admission, and the value of his instructions,

In vast and boundless solitude he stands

And round, and round, heaven and the desert | Day springs from distant ocean ; calm and bright may be gathered from the conversation which

meet;

Winds, like a glittering snake, the lovely Tweed; passed upon this occasion :It is a naked universe of sand

Rocks-dewy forests catch the rosy light, “An overseer who was present, addressing That stretches round, and burns beneath the feet: The early bee is humming o'er the mead; the attorney of the estate which he managed, Stillness, dread stillness, reigas ! and he, alone, O'er ivied cots the smoke is trailing fair, said, 'He (the clergyman) asked me to allow Stands where drear solitude has reared his throne. | And the bird sings, and flow'rs scent all the air. him to catechise the slaves on the estate, Sir ; ) Look on the ground : behold the moistless bed, but I referred him to you. Has he spoken to | Where lies his faithful dromedary, dead !

The shepherd resting on his crook, the line you, Sir?' 'You did perfectly right. He has | Mark his despairing look, as his wild eye

Of Cheviot mountains distant, dim, and blue ; not spoken to me yet. Then he is not to Stretches its aching sight, as if to try

The waters murmuring as they flow and shine; attend, Sir?' · Certainly not. He has con- | To pierce beyond the desert and the sky!

Tall spires the summer foliage glancing through, nected himself with the Church Missionary

Quick thoughts-remembrances—hopes, deep and | Enchant the gazer, till he dreams he be Society, and it is high time to put down fana

strong

In Tempe's vale, or Pan's own Arcady. ticism in the country. But the catechist is

The Arab maid, that wept a fond adieu,

And wished and prayed he might not tarry long; still attending, Sir. Is he to go on?' 'Oh,

And here stands Abbotsford-romantic dome! the Bishop's catechist. What does he teach?

| And said she loved him, and she would be true ; | Attracting more than all this lovely scene;

And home, and all the scenes of early days, Does he teach reading?' 'No, Sir; he teaches

For glorious genius here hath made a homeCome, with a rushing sickness, o'er his soul; Its turrets whitening o'er the woods of green, them to repeat the Church Catechism.' No | For he sees life fast Heeting to its goal:

Slopes, larches, to the small forget-me-not, thing more?' 'No, Sir.' "Then he may be He casts around a last despairing gaze

A magic breathe, and tell of fame and Scott. allowed to continue. That can do no harm; O'er the wide universe of burning sand, IT WILL DO NO GOOD; but it can do no harm. And strikes his forehead with liis clenched hand.

Peace, Abbotsford, to thee! and him whose fame He may go on!' And now he hurries on with rapid stride,

Hath haloed thee with interest ne'er to die; “When,' asks the writer, ' will the Bishop's As if (vain hope!) to pass the boundless sands,

Linked with his immortality, thy name eyes be open to his situation ? The lamentable

And reach some clime where gentle waters glide With Petrarch's venerated pile shall vie.* fact is, that he is now merely an instrument in Through smiling valleys, and green shady lands;

Pilgrims from southern land, and o'er the sea, the hands of the planters, by which they are But still the desert rises on his view,

When we are dust, shall fondly bow to thee. And still the deep sand sinks beneath his tread; endeavouring to put a stop to the progress of

London. religion in the island!

Fainting, he stops exhausted—but anew It is enough to make | Onward in phrenzy runs—his dizzy head one's heart sick ; but it is too true that every Turns round-oh, God! his tottering knees give zealous clergyman who is anxious to discharge

• The villa of Petrarch still stands at Arquato, and,

| with his tomb, receives during, the year the homage of bis duty finds himself checked at every point by He falls, and dying lies, theffell hyæna's prey. thousands.

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THE MARKET AT TRIESTE macher. A triangular slip of the face is alone nearer approach, I discovered a movement which

visible, the forehead being covered, and the chin could not be otherwise than spontaneous, I The following sketch of the Market at Trieste | left bare. Hundreds of these white-headed could not help laughing at my own astonishment. is extracted from The Pedestrian," by Charles people are seen entering the city early in the In describing it, I cannot do better than mainJoseph Latrobe. 1832.

morning with bread for city consumption, that tain the similitude already used-that of a gi

being made chiefly at the farms. They have gantic mushroom torn up by the roots. But “ I consider myself fortunate that I landed a very singularly shaped head and a peculiar what a beautiful mushroom! The general in Trieste, at all times a busy bustling city, on cast of countenance, and are evidently a dis- colour of the substance composing it is a delia market-day, when it presented itself in its tinct race from the inhabitants of the opposite cate transparent white, through which a star, most lively state. The first thing that struck shores. The population of the inland parts of composed of four rays, may be seen in the me was the great variety of nations and cus- | Carnolia, Istria, and Dalmatia, is still in a head. The gills of the same, which form a tomers that filled the market-place and port, | half-savage state. There is, moreover, a most fine film, appeared crimped in the most exquicomprising Greeks, Turks, Armenians, Sclavo. singular race inhabiting the mountainous dis- site manner, and tinged with purple. The nians, and others of their class, and groups of trict between Trieste and Firuma, that supplies stalk is white, and the seeming roots, forming peasantry from the neighbouring mountains of the city with charcoal. Their appearance is a bunch of eight lobes, are mostly purple also. Dalmatia, Corinthia, and Illyria, each in a more like that of the Bedouin of the desert The motion by which it travels is to be perdress more or less peculiar. Then the contents than the civilized European. They wear rude ceived in the edge of the film surrounding of the market appeared but half European. shaggy clothing, and sandals of wood attached the head, and it seems to have perfect comThere were parrots and parroquets to be sold, to the feet by thongs; and their demeanour mand of its movements. When it is turned chattering among the canaries and other fo- comports well with the ideas conveyed by their from you, so as to allow you to peep under the reign-looking birds, that did not seem intended outward guise.”

film, you see a beautiful flower-looking subfor the table. Above all, I was startled by a From the pier he saw the phenomenon thus stance, forming the body. As soon as my row of baskets full of yellow-legged tortoises, described: “I there saw, for the first time, that wonder and admiration would allow me to struggling in durance vile, and selling for wonderful inhabitant of these seas, vulgarly turn my eyes aside and look around, I found wholesome food like the rest. They came from called the Baccia marina, or marine pot. I that there were many within sight, moving the woods of Turkey, and are eaten for good had heard much concerning it, for it happened about among the shipping." and pleasant food on fast-days. Then, as is that a few weeks previous to my visit, to the my custom, I took a turn in the fish-market; amazement of the whole city, the entire sea apfor I love to see the odd things that men fish peared one morning covered with them—thouout of the great waters—those with prickles sands upon thousands crowding in towards the and those with scales, with heads and without coast; whence coming and whither going no one

MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. them, with ten eyes, and only one great human knows but that God who created and preserves

The Massacre of St. Bartholomew was not looking eye in the middle of the stomach, with them. I had, however, but little idea of their

confined to the capital of France. Vicomte shape and form but without any definite use;– form and appearance; for, though I had seen

d'Orte, Governor of Bayonne, in the reign of all have a charm for nie, and incite me to muse the remains of hundreds upon the beach, where

Charles the Ninth, received the infamous orupon the infinite strength of that wisdom that they had been thrown by the surge, the colour

der to exterminate all the Protestants within has prescribed a sphere of action and of duty less, shapeless mass of jelly conveyed no idea

| his jurisdiction; and returned the following for each, far beyond our comprehension.” of beauty to the mind; and, when I saw someOf the peasantry of Carniol, a few miles to thing moving towards the shore with the gentle

noble and generous answer :the east of Trieste, he says, “The male cos- tide, having every appearancce of being a most 1 “Sire, I have communicated your Majesty's tume is chiefly striking for the enormous broad beautiful mushroom about fifteen inches in letter to the garrison and to the inhabitants brimmed dark hat and open-kneed breeches; | diameter, and a stalk of perhaps two feet long, of this city. I have been able to find among and the women's, for the white shawl, which apparently torn up by the roots, I was tempted them only brave soldiers and good citizens; serves at once for head-dress, veil, and sto- to descend and wait its arrival: but when, on a but not a single executioner.”

CURIOUS MANUSCRIPT OF M. DE LA , asm. It was Cazotte, an amiable man, of an | Pucelle.” “Oh," it was whispered, “the man HARPE.

original turn of mind, but unfortunately infa- is out of his senses !” for, during the whole of

tuated with the reveries of the illuminati. He his conversation, his countenance never underThe following manuscript has recently renewed the conversation in a very serious tone, I went the least change. “Oh, no!” said anobeen handed to us, and is of so interest- and in the following manner:"Gentlemen,” | ther," you must perceive he is laughing at us, ing a character that we cannot withhold | said he, “be satisfied you will all see this for he always blends the marvellous with his it from our readers. It purports to have 1 grand and sublime revolution. You know that pleasantries.” “Yes," replied Chamfort," the been written by the celebrated M. De la 1 am something of a prophet, and I repeat | marvellous with him is never enlivened with

that you will all see it." He was answered by gaiety. He always looks as if he were going Harpe, and is accompanied by a state- the common expression, “ It is not necessary to be hanged. But when will all this hapment that it was found among his pos- 1 to be a great conjurer to foretel that. pen ? " Six years will not have passed away thumous papers. We have endeavoured “Agreed: but it may perhaps be necessary before all which I have told you will be acin vain to obtain any evidence with respect to be something more respecting what I am complished.” “Here, indeed, is plenty of to its authenticity, and will therefore now going to tell you. Have you any idea miracles,” (it was myself, says M. De la Harpe. leave that question to the coniecture of what will result from this revolution? What who now spoke)" and you set me down for our readers.

will happen to yourselves, to every one now nothing.” “You will yourself be a miracle as

present; what will be the immediate progress extraordinary as any which I have told; you It appears to me as if it were hut yesterday : 1 of it. with its certain effects and conse- will be a Christian." Loud exclamations imand it was nevertheless in the beginning of quences?” “Oh,” said Condorcet, with his mediately followed. "Ah!” replied Chamthe year 1788; we were at the table of a silly and saturnine laugh, let us know all fort, "all my fears are removed; for, if we are brother academician, who was of the highest about it; a philosopher can have no objection not doomed to perish till La Harpe becomes a rank, and a man of talents. The company to meet a prophet." "You, M. Condorcet, Christian, we shall be immortal.” was numerous, and of all kinds; courtiers, will expire on the pavement of a dungeon ; " As for us women," said the Duchess of advocates, literary men, academicians, &c. you will die of the poison you will have taken Grammont, “it is very fortunate that we are We had been, as usual, luxuriantly enter- I to escape from the hands of the executioner- considered as nothing in these revolutions; tained ; and, at the dessert, the wines of Mal- of poison which the happy state of that period not that we are totally discharged from all voine and the Cape added to the natural | will render it absolutely necessary that you concern in them, but it is understood that in gaiety of good company that kind of social should carry about vou At first, there ap- such cases we are to be left to ourselves. Our freedom, which sometimes stretches beyond peared a considerable degree of astonishment; | sex- " “ Your sex, ladies, will be no the rigid decorum of it. In short, we were in but it was soon recollected that Cazotte was in guarantee to you in these times; it will make a state to allow of anything that would pro- the habit of dreaming when he was awake, no difference whatever, whether you interfere duce mirth. Chamfort had been reading and the laugh was as loud as ever. “M. Ca- or not. You will be treated precisely as the some of his impious and libertine tales, and

zotte, the tale which you have just told us is men; no distinction will be made between the fine ladies had heard them without once not so pleasant as your Diable Amoreux. But you.” “ But what does all this mean, M. making use of their fans. A deluge of plea- what devil has put this dungeon, this poison, Cazotte ? You are merely preaching to us santries on religion then succeeded; one gave and these hangmen in your head? What can about the end of the world.” “I know no

these things have in common with philosophy more of that, my lady duchess, than yourself; ther recollected and applauded the philosophi and the reign of reason ?” “That is precisely but this I know, that you will be conducted to cal distitch of Diderot

what I am telling you. It will be in the name the scaffold, with several other ladies along "Et des Boyeaux du dernier Pretre,

of philosophy, of humanity, and of liberty-it with you, in the cart of the executioner, and Serrez le cou du dernier Roi.”

will be under the reign of reason, that what I with your hands tied behind you.” “I hope, And of the last priest's entrails form the string indeed be the reion of reason for she will la coach hung with black.” have foretold will happen to you. It will then Sir, in such a case, I shall be allowed at least

“No, madam, around the neck of the last king.

have temples erected to her honour. Nay, you will not have that indulgence. Ladies of A third rises, and, with a bumper in his hand, throughout France there will be no other higher rank than you will be drawn in a cart “Yes, gentlemen," he exclaims, “I am as places of public worship than the temples of as you will be, and to the same fate as that to sure that there is no God as I am certain that reason." In faith,” said Chamfort, with one which you are destined.” “ Ladies of higher Homer was a fool.”

of his sarcastic smiles, “you will not be an rank than myself? What! princesses of the The conversation afterwards took a more officiating priest in any of these temples." blood ?” “Greater still.” Here there was a serious turn, and the most ardent admiration" I hope not; but you, M. Chamfort, you will very sensible emotion throughout the comwas expressed of the revolution which Voltaire be well worthy of that distinction; for you pany, and the countenance of the maitre of had produced, and they all agreed that it will cut yourself across the throat with twenty the mansion now wore a very grave and formed the brightest day of his glory. “He two strokes of the razor, and will nevertheless solemn aspect; it was indeed very generally has given the ton to his age, and has contrived survive the attempt for some months.” They observed that this pleasantry was carried rather to be read in the chamber as well as in the all looked at him, and continued to laugh. too far, Madam de Grammont, in order to drawing-room. One of the company men-“ You (Monsieur Dazyr), you will not open disperse the cloud that seemed to be approachtioned, and almost burst with laughter at the your veins yourself, but you will order them ing, made no reply to his last answer, but circumstance, that his bair-dresser had said, to be opened six times in one day, during a contented herself with saying, with an air of while he was powdering him, “Look you, Sir: paroxysm of the gout, in order that you may gaiety, “You see he will not even leave me a though I am nothing but a poor journeyman not fail in your purpose, and you will die ) confessor.” “ No, madam, that consolation barber, I have no more religion than another during the night. As for you, M. de Nicolai, will be denied to all of you. The last person man.” It was concluded that the revolution you will die on the scaffold; and so, M. Bailly, led to the scaffold, who will be allowed a conwould soon be consummated, and that it was will you ; and so will you, M. Malesherbes.” fessor, as the greatest of favours, will be- " absolutely necessary for superstition and fana “ Oh, heavens !” said Roucher, “it appears Here he paused for a moment. “And who ticism to give place to philosophy. The pro- that his vengeance is levelled solely against the then is the happy mortal who will be allowed bability of this epoch was then calculated, and academy: he has just made most horrible to enjoy this prerogative ?” “ It is the only which of the company present would live to execution of the whole of it; now tell me my one which will be left him; it will be the see the reign of reason. The elder part of fate, in the name of mercy." “ You will die King of France." them lamented that they could not flatter also upon the scaffold." Oh!" it was uni- The master of the house now arose in haste, themselves with the hope of enjoying such a versally exclaimed, “ he was sworn to exter- and his company were all actuated by the pleasure ; while the younger part rejoiced in minate us all.” “No, it is not I who have same impulse. He then advanced towards M. the expectation that they should witness it. sworn it.” “ Are we then to be subjugted by Cazotte.“ We have had enough of these meThe academy was felicitated for having pre- Turks and Tartars?" "By no means; I have lancholy conceits. You carry it too far, even pared the grand work, and being at the same already told you you will then be governed by to the compromising the company with whom time the strong hold, the centre, and the reason and philosophy alone. Those who will you are, and yourself along with them.” Camoving principle, of freedom of thought. treat you as I have described will all of them zotte made no answer, and was preparing to

There was only one of the guests who had be pbilosophers, will be continually uttering retire; when Madam de 'Grammont, who not shared in the delights of this conversation; the same phrases as you have been repeating wished if possible to do do away all serious he had not even ventured, in a quiet way, to for the last hour, will deliver all your maxims, impressions, and restore some kind of gaiety start a few pleasantries on our noble enthusi- and will quote, as you have done, Diderot anal | among them, advanced towards him, and

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said, “My good prophet, you have been so gular sort of jest : how comes it that you are kind as to tell us all our fortunes, but you all king's? I confess that neither Martin nor have not mentioned any thing respecting your myself have the honour to be so.' Cacambo's own.” After a few moments' silence, with his master gravely replied, speaking Italian, 'I aseyes fixed on the ground, “ Madam,” he re- sure you, I am by no means in jest. I am plied, “ have you read the siege of Jerusalem, Achmet the Third. I was grand Sultan for as related by Josephus?” “ To be sure I have, many years; I dethroned my brother, and my and who has not? But you may suppose, if nephew has dethroned me. My Viziers have you please, that I know nothing about it.” had their heads cut off, and the remnant of i. Then you must know, madam, that during my life is to be passed in the old seraglio. My the siege of Jerusalem, a man, for seven succes- nephew, the grand Sultan Mahmoud, allows sive days, went round the ramparts of that me to travel sometimes for my health, and I city, in the sight of the besiegers and besieged, am come to pass the Carnival at Venice.' crying incessantly, in a loud and inauspicious | “A young man who was next to Achinet then voice, Woe to Jerusalem! And on the seventh spoke: My name is Ivan; I was Emperor of day he cried, 'Woe to Jerusalem and to my- all the Russias, but was dethroned in my craself!' At that very moment an enormous dle. My father and mother were imprisoned, stone thrown by the machines of the enemy and in prison they brought' me up. I have dashed him in pieces." M. Cazotte then made permission to travel occasionally, attended by bis bow and retired.

those who have the custody of me; and I also Thus far M. de la Harpe. Those who

am come to pass the Carnival at Venice.

" The third said, 'I am Charles-Edward, recollect the melancholy exit of all the

King of England. My father conferred on me characters above mentioned, during the the rights of royalty; I fought to maintain reign of terror in France, must be asto- | them; eight hundred of my partisans were put nished at the exact fulfilment of this to flight-slaughtered-disemboweled. I was remarkable prediction, so unlikely to be arrested at Paris, taken prisoner to Vincennes, accomplished at the time it was uttered. and am now going to Rome to pay a visit to

the king, my father, who was also dethroned,
like myself and my grandfather; and I am

come to pass the Carnival at Venice.'
EX-KINGS AT THE CARNIVAL OF “ The fourth spoke in these words: “I am
VENICE.

King of the Poles. The chances of war de

prived me of my hereditary dominions; my A Chapter translated from Candide." father experienced the same reverses of fortune.

I resign myself to Providence, like the Sultan This is a tale of former times, not inappli- Achmet, the Emperor Ivan, and the King cable to the present: “ One night Candide, at- Charles-Edward, to whom may God grant long tended by Martin, was just going to sit down life! I am come to pass the Carnival at Veat the supper-table with six strangers who were nice.' lodging at the same hotel, and had come to l « The fifth said, I am also King of the pass the Carnival at Venice, when a person of Poles. I lost my kingdom twice; but Provivery sooty complexion accosted him from be- l dence has given me another state, in which I hind, and, taking hold of his arm, said, 'Get have done more good than all the kings of the ready to depart with us, do not fail.' He Sarmatians together have ever done on the turned round, and saw it was Cacambo. Ca- banks of the Vistula. I likewise resign'mycambo, who served as cup-bearer to one of the self to Providence; and am come to pass the strangers, addressed his master, as soon as Carnival at Venice, supper was over,“ Sire, your Majesty may de- “ The sixth monarch now alone remained to part whenever you think proper—the vessel is

speak: 'Gentlemen,' said he, 'I am not so ready. Hearing these words, the astonished

great a sovereign as you ; but, nevertheless, I guests looked at one another without speaking have been a king like yourselves. My name is a single word; when another servant came and

Theodore : I was elected King of Corsica, and addressed his master: Sire, your Majesty's

they called me Your Majesty, while at present coach is at Padua, and the vessel is ready.' I they scarcely deign to call me Monsieur. 1 The master made a sign, and the servant went have coined money, and now I have not a faraway. The guests looked at each other again, thing belonging to me. I have had two Secreand their inutual surprise was redoubled. A taries of State, and now I have hardly a valet. third valet, approaching a third stranger, said I have been seated on a throne, and for a long to him, “Sire, take my advice; your Majesty time I was doomed to sleep on straw within had better not remain here any longer; I will the walls of a prison at London. To say the get every thing ready for your departure :' and truth, I have reason to fear I shall be in the immediately he disappeared.

same situation here, though I am come, like "Candide and Martin had no doubt that all

your Majesties—to pass the Carnival at Vethis was a Carnival masquerade. A fourth

nice.' servant came up to a fourth master, Every

“ The five kings listened to this discourse thing is in readiness for your Majesty's depar- with a most royal compassion ; each gave ture;" and, like the others, he also went away. twenty sequins to King Theodore, to enable The fifth valet made a similar address to the him to buy a few shirts and some clothes. fifth stranger; but the sixth spoke in a different Candide presented him with a diamond worth manner to his master, who happened to be sit- I two thousand sequins. How is this,' exting next Candide: 'Indeed, Sire, they will claimed the five monarchs, in astonishment, not give any more credit, either to your Ma- that a private individual should be in a situajesty or to me; and we stand a chance of being tion to give a hundred times as much as each both locked up in jail this very night. I must of us; and what is more, that he should giv take care of myself—adieu.'

| it too ? Just as they were rising from table, "All the servants having left the room, the six four other. Most Serene Highnesses,' who had strangers, as well as Candide and Martin, pre- I been driven from their States by the fortune served a profound silence. At last, Candide war, entered the Hotel, with an intention to thus interrupted it: Gentlemen, this is a sin

a sin- \ pass the Carnival at Venice."

Weep not, weep not, that in the spring

We have to make a grave;
The flowers will grow, the birds' will sing,

The early roses wave,
And make the sod we're spreading fair

For her who sleeps below;
We might not bear to lay her there

In winter frost and snow. .
We never hoped to keep her long :

When but a fairy child,
With dancing step and bird-like song,

And eyes that only smiled, ;
A something shadowy and frail

Was even in her mirth;
She looked a flower that one rough gale:

Would bear away from earth.
There was too clear and blue a light

Within her radiant eyes :
They were too beautiful, too bright,

Too like their native skies;
Too changeable the rose which shed

Its colour on her face,
Now burning with a passionate red,

Now with just one faint trace.
She was too thoughtful for her years,

Its shell the spirit wore;
And when she smiled away our fears,

We only feared the more. .
The crimson deepened on her cheek,

Her blue eyes shone more clear,
And every day she grew more weak,

And every hour more dear.
Her childhood was a happy time,

The loving and beloved;
Yon sky, which was her native clime,

Hath but its own removed.
This earth was not for one to whom

Nothing of earth was given;
'Twas but a resting place—her tomb

Between the world and heaven.

THE CLYDE AND TWEED.

BY JOHN MACKAY WILSON.
Nursed on a rocky mountain's breast,

Two twin-born rivers played ;
And parting-one rushed fleetly west,

The other eastward strayed.
The Clyde rolled on-a warrior's song

Of triumph ; while the Tweed
With stilly murmur swept along,

Its voice the shepherd's reed.
A bridegroom, leaping light with joy,

On, onward bounded Clyde;
The Tweed, a maiden, timid, coy,

Moved like a blushing bride.
The Clyde rushed forth in glory, where

The sunbeams revelled wild:
The Tweed, in beauty softly fair,

Was kissed by moonlight mild.
The Clyde, a bright and dark-eyed maid,

Commanding met the view;
The Tweed, in modest grace arrayed,

Would fondly, gently woo.
Sublimity and beauty's tread

Impressed their favoured Clyde,
While loveliness hung o'er her Tweed,

And slumbered on its side.
The Clyde embraced a golden Firth,

Where lake and mountain shone,
And fairy islands left the earth

To deck her marriage throne.
The Tweed her deckings cast aside,

Plain was her bridal bed,
Fair Tweed, an unadorned bride,

The hoary ocean wed !

Summ. Spring Winter Aut.

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THE CALENDAR OF THE FRENCH These supplementary days were termed com- 1

APHORISMS.
REVOLUTION.

plementary, as filling or completing the year;

were also vulgarly called sans culottides, out On the 5th October, 1793, during the awful of an alleged respect to the revolutionary mob, Parties are founded on principle-factions o reign of ROBESPIERRE, when the French rulers the Septembrizers. They were holidays, and men.-ROBERT HALL employed themselves alternately in deeds of called

The best governments are always subject to be death and minute attention to trifles, a new The first....Primidi..Dedicated to virtue. like the fairest crystals, wherein every icicle or grain calendar, framed by FABRE D'EGLANTINE, | The second.Duodi.................... genius.

is seen, wbich in a fouler stone is never perceived. was presented to the convention, at that time The third... Tredi.................... labour.

-IB. ruled despotically by ROBESPIERRE, formed The fourth.. Quortidi................., opinion.

The sin of blood is a destroying, wasting, mur. upon so republican a model as effectually to The fifth.... Quintidi................ recompence.

dering sin; murdering others besides those whom

it kills : it breaks the back of governments, sinks destroy every allusion either to things before

Answering to the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, and families, destroys for the future, reaches into sucheld sacred as relating to the Deity, or re

21st of September; and, in leap-year, the ad cessions, and cuts off posterities. DR. SOUTH. spectable, as complimentary to human virtue ditional or sixth day was called Sextidi.

It seems that enemies have been always found in past ages. As all important facts connected

Besides these holidays, they had also Decades the most faithful monitors; for adversity has ever with the history of France during the short

substituted for Sundays, days of course no been considered as the state in which a man most period of this calendar's existence were relonger held sacred by a nation that had em

easily becomes acquainted wiih himself. DR. corded according to this new nomenclature, braced atheism by the public sanction of the

JOHNSON. intended to designate the actual passing sea

Death falls heavily upon him who is too much new government. sons, it may be interesting to show, by the

known to others, and too little to himself, -SE

Among other puerilities and absurdities of following table, in what manner the French

NECA. the French calendar, may also be included the months agreed with those of other nations, and

borrowed application of the titles of the to which even France itself found it absolutely

months, intended as they were to be expressive necessary to revert. of the various seasons of production, matu

REMARKABLE ESCAPE. French Months. Signification. English Months. rity, decay, and torpidity of the vegetable

A HOTTENTOT, perceiving that he was fol( 1. Vendemaire ..... Vintage......Sept. 22

world. In a territory comprehending climates lowed by a lion and concluding that the a 2. Brumaire......... Foggy ........Oct. 22

so diversified as that of France, the variations mal only waited the approach of night to make (3. Frimaire......... Frosty ........Nov. 21 of the seasons must necessarily defy any de

| him his prey, began to consider of the best scription that can be universally appropriate; (4. Nivose ............Snowy.........Dec. 21 and an English wit, disgusted with the “nam-length effected in the following singular man

method of providing for his safety; which he at 35. Pluviose .........Rainy.........Jan. 20 $ (6. Ventose .......... Windy ........Feb. 19 by-pamby” style of the French calendar, ridi

ner:--Observing a piece of broken ground, with a culed this new method of registering time in 17. Germinal........Budding......March 21

precipitate descent on one side, he sat down by the following ludicrous translation of their {8. Floreal ...........Flowery....... April 20 months, as divided by them into seasons, con

the edge of it, and found, to his great joy, that (9. Prairial..........Hay Harvest..May 20

the lion also made a halt, and kept at the same sidering it a critique more suitable to the in5 ( 10. Alessdor...... .Corn Harvest June 19

distance as before. As soon as it grew dark, significance of the subject, than argument or

the Hottentot, sliding gently forward, let him11. Thermidor ....Hot ............July 19 ) grave discussion.

self down a little below the edge of the hill, ä (12. Fructidor ......Fruit ........... Aug. 18 AUTUMN-wheezy, sneezy, freezy.

and held up his cloak and hat upon a stick, By the preceding table it will be seen, that

WINTER——slippy, drippy, nippy.

making at the same time a gentle motion with

SPRING—showery, flowery, bowery. the French year commenced on the 22nd of

it; the lion, in the meanwhile, came creeping September, or on the autumnal equinox, a

SUMMER—hoppy, croppy, poppy.

softly towards him, like a cat, and, mistaking period universally acnowledged to be incon- | This system, which originated in crime, folly, | the skin cloak for the man himself, made a sistent with reason and the long recorded phe- and ignorance, was abandoned in the year spring, and fell headlong down the precipice. nomena of nature, the sun being then retro- | 1805, by a senatus-consulte of the 9th of Sep- -Wood's Animals. grade, and its annual course drawing towards | tember. a termination ; but the revolutionary and impious mania for obliterating all allusions to

THE DIAL OP FLOWERS.

TOR the CURE of COUGHS, COLDS,

I ASTHMAS, SHORTNESS of BREATH, &c. &c.the Deity, by those who taught that death

BY MRS. HEMANS.

WALTER'S ANISEED PILLS.-The numerous and was only an eternal sleep," rendered that de

respectable Testimonials daily received of the extraordi

'Twas a lovely thought to mark the hours, luded and versatile people regardless of estab

nary efficacy of the above Pills, in curing the most dise As they floated in light away,

tressing and long-established diseases of the pulmonary and lished customs and opinions, howeversanctioned

By the opening and the folding flowers

respiratory organs, induce the Proprietor to recommend by the experience and authority of ages, pro "That laugh to the summer's day.

them to the notice of those afflicted with the above comvided that, by the introduction of a novel

plaints, conceiving that a Medicine which has now stood Thus had each moment its own rich hue,

the test of experience for several years cannot be too genesystem, the great object of the revolutionists

rally known. They are composed entirely of balsamic

And its graceful cup or bell, might be promoted by the innovation ; and

and vegetable ingredients, and are so speedy in their bene.

In whose colour'd vase might sleep the dew, ficial effects, that in ordinary cases a few doses have been yet the people of France, and even the con

Like a pearl in an ocean-shell.*

found sufficient; and, unlike most Cough Medicines, they vention, were themselves conscious of the

neither affect the head, confine the bowels, nor produce

any of the unpleasant sensations so frequently complained gross absurdity of this vainly denominated

To such sweet signs might the time have flow'd

of. The following cases are submitted to the Public from Calendar of Reason," and attempted to ex

In a golden current on,

many in the Proprietor's possession : K. Boke, of Globeplain their selection of the 22nd of September

Ere from the garden, man's first abode,

lane, Mile-end, was perfectly cured of a violent cough,

attended with hoarseness, which rendered his speech inauas having originated in a principle of policy,

The glorious guests were gone.

dible, by taking three or four doses. E. Booley, of Queenit being impossible to establish it on that of So might the days have been brightly told street, Spitalfields, after taking a few doses, was entirely

cured of a most inveterate cough, which he had had for the course of nature. On the 21st of Septem Those days of song and dreams

many months, and tried almost every thing without sucber, 1792, the representatives of the nation When shepherds gather'd their flocks of old,

cess. Prepared by W. Walter, and sold by I. A. Shar. had pronounced the abolition of royalty; on By the blue Arcadian streams.

wood, No. 55, Bishopsgate Without, in boxes, at 1s. Ifu.

and three in one for 2s. 9d.; and by appointment, by Han. the 22nd, it was formally proclaimed, and So in those isles of delight that rest

nay and Co., No. 63, Oxford-street; Green, No. 42, Whitethat day decreed to be thenceforth deemed the Far off in a breezeless main,

chapel-road; Prout, No. 226, Strand; Sharp, Cross-street,

Islington; Pink, No. 65, High-street, Borough; Allison,

Which many a bark, with a weary quest, FIRST of the REPUBLIC; and it was solely to

No. 130, Brick-lane, Bethnal-green; Farrar, Upton-place, accord with such new era that religion and Hath sought, but still in vain.

Commercial-road; Hendebonrck, 326, Holborn; and by

all the wholesale and retail Medicine Venders in the United philosophy were sacrificed on the altar of in. Yet is not life, in its real flight,

Kingdom.-N.B. In consequence of the increased deinand novation.

Mark'd thus-even thus-on earth,

for this excellent Medicine, the Public are cautioned The division of the year into months of 30 By the closing of one hope's delight,

against Counterfeits-none can be genuine unless signed by

I. A. Sharwood on the Government Stamp, and W, Walter days each, and of those months into Decades, And another's gentle birth?

on the ontside wrapper.- Be sure to ask for “ Walter's produced no improvement on the ancient

Oh! let us live, so that Aower by flower,

Aniseed Pills." system ; for as, by that regulation, only 360

Shutting in turn, may leave days were comprehended in the 12 months,

A lingerer still for the sunset hour, they were compelled to add five others to A charm for the shaded eve.

Printed by J. Haddon and Co.; and Published make out the number of the ordinary year,

by J. CRISP, at No. 27, Ivy Lane, Paternoster and six to every fourth or bissextile year,

• This dial was, I believe, formed by Linnæus, and marked the hours by the opening and closing, at regular

Row, where all Advertisements and Communiintervals, of the flowers arranged in it.

cations for the Editor are to be addressed.

urate,

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