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PAGK An Appeal to the Jury..

Phillips, 303 Ireland......

...Meagher, 364 War Sometimes a Mora] Duty

366 The Strength of Paganism....

Lacordaire, 368 Time Vanquished by Jesus Christ.....

371 374

377 Exile of Erin.....

Campbell, 380 What Makes a Hero.....

... Taylor, 381 The Bible.......

.Dorioso Cortes, 383 Cato on the Soul's Immortality..

....dddison, 386 Cato's Speech over his Dead Son..

387 England's Doom........

. Abp. Spalding, 388 The Martyrs of Fatherland ....

De Vere, 390 The Fire-Worshippers (Lalla Rookh).

Moore, 392 Titus before Jerusalem. ...

. Müman, 394 The Wonderful “ One Hoss Shay'

Holmes, 395 The Rising of the Vendée..

. Croly, 40C Self-Interest; or, Where there's a Will there's a Way....... 405 The Battle of Life.....

Longfellow, 410 Vanoc and Valens....

Phillips, 411 The Quarrel between Brutus and Cassius.... . Shakspeare, 415 The Soft Answer...

..Arthur, 419 Coriolanus and Aufidius.

..Shakspeare. 426 Cato's Senate...

.Addison, 429 Hamlet and Horatio..

.Shakspeare, 432 Alcestis and Pheres...

. Translated by Mrs. Hemans, 436 Introitus ....

.Longfellow, 442 Vox Clamantis.

446 Mount Quarantania..

450 The Dream of Gerontius....

..Dr. Newman, 454

PRINCIPLES OF ELOCUTION.

ELOCUTION is an important branch of oratory; wo important, that eloquence borrows its name from it. The theory consists of certain rules, which should be observed by all who read or speak in private companies or public assemblies. In practice elocution consists in the art of reading, or speaking, with propriety and elegance; or of delivering our words in a just and graceful manner; untainted with pedantry or affectation, and uncorrupted with any provincial sound or dialect.

It is absolutely necessary that every young gentleman should be acquainted with the science of elocution, especially those who are intended for the pulpit, the senate, the bar, or the stage; so that very few persons need be told, that a graceful elocution is of the highest importance. Everybody will allow, that what a nian 19.s occasion daily to do, should be done well; yet so little attention has sometimes been paid to this accom. plishment, even from those, in whom (from their pro fessions as public speakers) we have been led to expect a perfect model of the art, that it has tended to eclipse

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all their other merits, however great; while others, of inferior attainments, by the help of a tolerably good style, and a just elocution, have risen to considerable eminence.

A graceful elocution is, to a good style, what a good style is to the subject matter of a discourse, an effectual ornament: for, if the subject of a discourse be ever so interesting, and the speaker's knowledge ever so profound, without a correct style the discourse must suffer greatly in its reputation; and though the speaker's abilities be of the first eminence, and the style good, with a bad elocution, or delivery, it will fare little better : so great an effect have these exterior accomplishments over the public taste. Indeed, the great design and end of a good pronunciation is, to make the ideas seem to come from the heart; and then they will not fail to excite the attention and affections of those who hear us read or speak.

The principal design which we have in view is to show:

First. What a bad pronunciation is, and how to avoid it.

Secondly. What a good pronunciaiton is and how to attain it.

In the first place, it may be necessary to mention, that a chief fault of pronunciation is, when the voice is too loud, This is very disagreeable to the hearer, and inconvenient to the speaker It will be disagreeable to the hearers, if they be persons of good taste; who will look upon it to be the effect of ignorance or affectation. Besides, an overstrained voice is very inconvenient to the speaker, as well as disgustful to judicious hearers

It exhausts his spirits tc no purpose, and takes from him the proper management and modulation of his voica according to the sense of his subject; and, what is worst of all, it leads him into what is called a tone. Every person's voice should fill the place where he speaks; but, if it exceed its natural key, it will be neither sweet, nor soft, nor agreeable, because he will not be able to give every word its proper sound.

Anuther fault in pronunciation is, when the voice is too low. This is not so inconvenient to the speaker, but it is as disagreeable to the hearer, as the other extreme. It is offensive to an audience, to observe anything in the reader or speaker that looks like indolence or inatten. sion. The hearer can never be affected while he per. reives the speaker indifferent. The art of governing the voice consists chiefly in avoiding these two extremes ; and, for a general rule to direct us herein, the following is a very good one: “Be careful to preserve the key of your voice; and, at the same time, to adapt the elevation and strength of it to the condition and number of the persons you speak to, and the nature of the place you speak in.” It would be altogether as ridiculous in a general, who is haranguing an army, to speak in a low and languid voice, as in a person, who reads a chapter in a family circle, or the narrative of any particular historical occurrence, to speak in a loud and eager one.

Another fault in pronunciation is, a thick, hasty, chat tering voice. When a person mumbles, that is, leaves out some syllables in the long words, and never pro20unces some of the short ones at all : but burries on

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