Homo Narrans: The Poetics and Anthropology of Oral Literature

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University of Pennsylvania Press, Mar 19, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 296 pages

It would be difficult to imagine what human life would be like without stories—from myths recited by Pueblo Indian healers in the kiva, ballads sung in Slovenian market squares, folktales and legends told by the fireside in Italy, to jokes told at a dinner table in Des Moines—for it is chiefly through storytelling that people possess a past.

In Homo Narrans John D. Niles explores how human beings shape their world through the stories they tell. The book vividly weaves together the study of Anglo-Saxon literature and culture with the author's own engagements in the field with some of the greatest twentieth-century singers and storytellers in the Scottish tradition. Niles ponders the nature of the storytelling impulse, the social function of narrative, and the role of individual talent in oral tradition. His investigation of the poetics of oral narrative encompasses literary works, such as the epic poems and hymns of early Greece and the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf, texts that we know only through written versions but that are grounded in oral technique.

That all forms of narrative, even the most sophisticated genres of contemporary fiction, have their ultimate origin in storytelling is a point that scarcely needs to be argued. Niles's claims here are more ambitious: that oral narrative is and has long been the chief basis of culture itself, that the need to tell stories is what distinguishes humans from all other living creatures.

 

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Contents

1 Making Connections
1
2 Somatic Communication
33
3 Poetry as Social Praxis
66
4 Oral Poetry Acts
89
5 Beowulf as Ritualized Discourse
120
6 Context and Loss
146
7 The Strong TraditionBearer
173
Wordpower Wells from Deep in the Throat
194
Notes
205
Works Cited
237
Acknowledgments
265
Index
267
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About the author (2010)

John D. Niles is Frederic G. Cassidy Professor of Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is author and editor of many books, including Beowulf: The Poem and Its Tradition and coeditor, with Allen J. Frantzen, of Anglo-Saxonism and the Construction of Social Identity.

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