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This the marked battery, whence the gliding dart,
By soft surprise o'ercomes the lover's heart;
Wnile unallaulted by pre poflerous charnis,
The unconscious Mripling fears not beauty's arms,
Nor dreads the indorsement of delight which swells
The mill-lone symmetry of footy belles ;
This che huge pent-house, where the purblind child
In shadowed ambuih, many a soul beguiled,
To glow beneath the latitude of charms,
Which coy and la kward bless no lover's arms,
And hail those orbs which luftre roupd dispense,
Like moons autmnal to his ravished sense.
So two twin mountains whose prouuding bulk,
18 wrape in moody clouds of vapoury sulk,
Arise in fair proportion from the land,
Like Paragonians on Pigmcan ftrand :
If chance fome shallop's long bewilder'd crew, :
With optic tube their threat ning tummits view,
Rocks, waters, woods, in favage rudeness hurl d,
Appear to them the Eden of the world ;
Joy crumples up their nose and curls their chin,
Their cackling jaws display as broad a grin
As Pole's, to hear, as burden to the song,
His bantling, Wellesley, nabbed Miss Til-y L-g
Ac R-ch-d's, glorious in paternal glee,
Dead drunk as David's fow, and wild with revelry
Oh! sacred spot ! where nature, sense, and tate,
The fundamental seat of beauty placed !
To this, as centre of their magic ring,
Both grace and gravity adhesive cling.
This the plump pudding, where the fons of men
May come and cut, and cut and come again;
Love's Magazine of crackers and alarumi,
The “ Husieron proteron" of inverted charnis.
Here no coimetics fpread unreal bloom,
No gums Arabic breathe a false perfume ;
Here no small.pox, “ with Tarquin's ravishing Atride,"
The charms can blast of virgin or of tride;
A face may fade, a sparkling eye grow dull,
And youthfull locks desert a reverend skull;
The mouth may link without its deptal prop,
The brows may wrinkle and the nose may drop;
But this shall flourish in eternal bloom,
The * seat of honour, beauty, and perfume!!!

(To he continued.)

The author presumes that a calumniating world cannot accuse him of vanity or egocism, when he affertor what, in his own humble opinion, this beautiful climax is by no means inferior co, but has the advantage over the following celebrated verses of Addison :

" The stars Thall fade away, the sun bimselt
" Grow dim with age, and nature sink in years,
" But those” (meaning the immortal part) Mall Aourish in eternal youth
Unhurt, amid the war of elements,
" The wreck of matter and the crush of worlds."*
* Comparisons are odious

PRINTER DITIL

OBITUARY. "Ja Skinner-row, in the 67th year of her age, Mrs. Boswell, wife of Mr. Boswell, an eminent Silver-smith. On the Coombe, in the prime of life, Mr. Stephen Hanratty, an cminent Builder; a young man whose excellent character and promising abilities gave wellgrounded assurance to bis family and friends, of reputable difonction, unbappily interrupted by a premature death.

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With this Number we give an excellent Likeness of

BELLINGHAM, Who killed Mr. PERCEVAL in the House of Commons,

on Monday, the 11th of May, 1812.

BELLINGHAM, to contempt and beggary, the demon

of revenge blindly impelled him to THE unfortunate gentleman who attribute his wrongs and misfortunes

1 had adopted the rash and ex to those whom his fancy painted as traordinary resolution of assassinating enemies, because they could not, or some of the leading members of the would not relieve him. The firmness government, appears, by his petition and equanimity of mind he preserved presented to the House of Commons, subsequent to the fatal aci, and the in February last, to have suffered, in collected appearance of his conduct on the loss of his property, by the care his trial, betrayed no symptom of inlessness with which his representations sanity. If he acted under the influence were treated by the British Ambas- of madness, it appears to have tersador, at the Court of St. Petersburgh. minated with the life of the victim, as

Exasperated at the indifference his pe if the horrid act had been a remedy · tition, and individual application to . for the disease under which the unfor: ministers, and, perhaps, acting under tunate gentleman was languishing.. the influence of a temporary derange In England, the event produced. ment of mind, which, in men of warm different sensations. The Members of : 1 feelings, might be the consequence of both Houses expressed all the mecha. ., being reduced from rank and opulence nical sorrow and regre that scomFor June, 1812, Vol. V.

21

panies

panies the higher ranks of life on and intellectual refinement, to be disimilar losses. Mr. Perceval was pa. verted from their allegiance by ordinegyrized by every Lord and Com. nary circumstances, only familiar to moner who could speak ; they went baser minds. It is allowed, on all into mourning, adjourned their sit. hands, that they are starving, granted, tings, provided for his children, sent but they are not to be led into tur. their carriages and horses to perform bulence and disaffection by such a the empty solemnity of a funeral, while paltry circumstance as famine. It is a they distributed themselves into num. French faction, such a French faction berless detachments to intrigųe with as Mr. Grattan discovered in Ireland, his successor.

that discurbs the generous and po. Out of the political climate of St. lished Britons, Stephan's, or James's, the death of the ' In Ireland the fate of the minister minister caused not one sensation, from passed unheeded ; the methodistical which could be understood any ex. fanatical enemy to Catholic Emanci. pression of regret for the departed. Pation was too contemptible in the On the contrary, the people of London eyes of six millions of people to allow appeared more affected by the suffer them to descend to notice his transings of Mr. Bellingham, than at the migration. A nation cannot hang its loss of Mr. Perceval.

. fortune on any one enemy; bę may die In the country, particularly in Not- under the assassins knife, or dictate in tingkam, the news was received with the Senate, with equal indifference to shouts of joy. The bells were rung, us. Our destiny is inseparable from bontires made, and every other mani, that of Europe and the civilized festation of festivity, usual upon the world ; and from the jarring elements, most important national events, were that disgrace and torment the earth, expressed in every direction. The po. some spark must be elicited that may pulace, who are starving in that popu. light us to better prospects, but no lous county, by the want of employ. event can occur that can place us ment and provisions, must-have had lower. In this manner of treating the some.oral accounts, that the war, and minor transactions, the Irish nation the orders in council, which may be will continue,r. neither to be seduced attributed to ministers, are really to into premature excesses, nor roused by be ascribed to their obstinacy and ar. aggrayation to retaliation ; she will rogance. Oral authority it must be, listen, in silenèe and dignity, to paltry that could so justly inform our masters things, and whether Cæsar perishes in on the real state of affairs, and the the Senate, or Louis on the Scaffold, source of their unexampled wretched both are equally indifferent to her, ness, for, however eminently they may Her object is to be free, and peace be gifted with the knowledge of and patience will conduct her to the stocking-making, they know very little desired station, ,,. i ; of the necromancy of reading. The wise Editors of the Government Jour. nals, in Ireland, attribute the indecent T O ROBERT HÅRTY, joy of the hosiers to a French Party. This is a general explanation for all

HOSIER ÅND SHREIFF, popular uneasinesses and excesses, a Sir, "

. . sweeping clause that embraces every I would not open a correspondence subject, and stands as an answer for with you, in my present situation, had every inquiry. For, the world ought not some late arrangements, with which to understand, the English Journeymen you threatened the prisoners, been car. and Preachers siand too high in moral ried into practice. For corrupt, ser

vile,

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