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" Funny position, wasn't it? The boredom came later, when we lived together on board his ship. I had, in a moment of inadvertence, created for myself a tie. How to define it precisely I don't know. One gets attached in a way to people one has done something... "
Victory - Page 197
1921
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VICTORY

JOSEP CONRAD - 1921
...walking, breathing, incarnate proof of the efficacy of prayer. I was a little fascinated by it—and then, could I have argued with him ? You don't argue...The germ of corruption has entered into his soul." have preferred to be killed outright—that is, to have his soul despatched to another world, rather...
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Graham Greene, an Introduction to His Writings, Volumes 37-39

Henry J. Donaghy - 1983 - 124 pages
...true escape because it is solitude, and a self that is divided. The novel's epigram is from Conrad: "I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered into his soul." Maurice Castle's soul is corrupted because a tie of gratitude exists between him and a Communist friend....
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The Spy Story

John G. Cawelti, Bruce A. Rosenberg - Literary Criticism - 1987 - 259 pages
...taken as a roman a clef (Escape, p. 228). Two sentences of Joseph Conrad's are quoted in the epigraph: "I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered into his soul." That is the problem with the human factor; it cannot be predicted or controlled as precisely as some...
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Corridors of Deceit: The World of John Le Carré

Peter Wolfe - Literary Criticism - 1987 - 275 pages
...Victory (1915), voiced in Graham Greene's epigraph to The Human Factor (1978), from opposite sides, viz., "He who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered into his soul." The person who's trapped and betrayed by his virtues recurs often in Greene. Maurice Castle of The...
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Fathers and Mothers in Literature, Pages 309-325

Henk Hillenaar, Walter Schönau - Social Science - 1994 - 325 pages
...and became a double agent leaking secrets to the Communists. But such a love entails fear and hate. "I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered his soul" (Joseph Conrad) figures as an epigraph to the novel. "Love was a total risk. Literature had...
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The Ruling Passion: British Colonial Allegory and the Paradox of Homosexual ...

Christopher Lane - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 326 pages
...his father requires abstention from all object relations rather than a specific taboo against one: "I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has already entered his soul" (215). In presenting this analogy between Victory 's account of intimacy...
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Ken Follett: The Transformation of a Writer

Carlos Ramet - Social Science - 1999 - 159 pages
...Joseph Conrad's Axel Heyst — a man who wished to live alone — for the epigraph to The Human Factor: "I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered into his soul."" In The Man from St. Petersburg, Follett takes as an epigraph a statement by Graham Greene: "One can't...
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Rethinking Administrative Theory: The Challenge of the New Century

Jong S. Jun - Business & Economics - 2002 - 322 pages
...reticulation. In his epigraph in The Human Factor, Graham Greene (1978a) quotes from Joseph Conrad: "I only know that he who forms a tie is lost. The germ of corruption has entered into his soul." The germ of corruption referred to is the force of one's conscience, the sense of moral obligation....
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Victory, an Island Tale

Joseph Conrad - 1929 - 396 pages
...world's bustle — that I should have been there to step into the situation of an agent of Providence. I, a man of universal scorn and unbelief. . . ." "You...soul." Heyst's tone was light, with the flavour of playf ulness which seasoned all his speeches and seemed to be of the very essence of his thoughts....
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Jospeh Conrad Poland's English Genius

...incomplete and frustrated relationships; but Heyst entirely repudiates them. "We perish'd, each alone." One gets attached in a way to people one has done...The germ of corruption has entered into his soul. (Victory, pp. 199-200) The world went by appearance and called us friends, as far as I can remember....
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