Fraser's Magazine, Volume 31

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James Anthony Froude, John Tulloch
J. Fraser, 1845 - Authors
Contains the first printing of Sartor resartus, as well as other works by Thomas Carlyle.

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Page 395 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 325 - We yield thee hearty thanks, most merciful Father, that it hath pleased thee to regenerate this infant with thy Holy Spirit, to receive him for thine own child by adoption, and to incorporate him into thy Holy Church.
Page 109 - Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 418 - Whatever earth, all-bearing mother, yields In India, East or West, or middle shore In Pontus, or the Punic coast, or where Alcinous reign'd, fruit of all kinds, in coat Rough, or smooth rind, or bearded husk, or shell...
Page 386 - Through the dim beams Which amid the streams Weave a net-work of coloured light...
Page 118 - Then so many as shall be partakers of the holy communion shall tarry still in the quire, or in some convenient place nigh the quire, the men on the one side, and the women on the other side.
Page 249 - Oh, how oft shall he On faith and changed gods complain, and seas Rough with black winds and storms Unwonted shall admire! Who now enjoys thee credulous, all gold; Who always vacant, always amiable, 10 Hopes thee, of flattering gales Unmindful. Hapless they To whom thou untried seem'st fair! Me, in my vowed Picture, the sacred wall declares t' have hung My dank and dropping weeds To the stern God of Sea.
Page 71 - I have often amused myself," says he, "with observing their plans of policy from my window in the Temple, that looks upon a grove where they have made a colony in the midst of a city. At the commencement of spring the rookery, which, during the continuance of winter, seemed to have been deserted, or only guarded by about five or six, like old soldiers in a garrison, now begins to be once more frequented; and in a short time, all the bustle and hurry of business...
Page 249 - WHAT slender Youth bedew'd with liquid odours Courts thee on Roses in some pleasant Cave, Pyrrha for whom bind'st thou In wreaths thy golden Hair, Plain in thy neatness? O how oft shall he On Faith and changed Gods complain : and Seas Rough with black winds and storms Unwonted shall admire : Who now enjoys thee credulous, all Gold, Who always vacant, always amiable Hopes thee ; of flattering gales Unmindful.
Page 14 - Sheridan for dinner — Colman for supper. Sheridan for claret or port; but Colman for every thing...

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