Readings in English Prose of the Nineteenth Century, Part 2

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Raymond Macdonald Alden
Houghton Mifflin, 1917 - English prose literature
 

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Page 547 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?
Page 563 - For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: but whosoever will lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it. 25 For what is a man advantaged, if he gain the whole world, and lose himself, or be cast away?
Page 461 - Therefore, when we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight, nor for present use alone; let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time is to come when those stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! this our fathers did for us.
Page 348 - In Being's floods, in Action's storm, I walk and work, above, beneath, Work and weave in endless motion ! Birth and Death, An infinite ocean ; A seizing and giving The fire of Living : Tis thus at the roaring Loom of Time I ply, And weave for God the Garment thou seest Him by.
Page 355 - To me the Universe was all void of Life, of Purpose, of Volition, even of Hostility: it was one huge, dead, immeasurable Steam-engine, rolling on, in its dead indifference, to grind me limb from limb.
Page 615 - Hugo says: we are all under sentence of death but with a sort of indefinite reprieve — les hommes sont tous condamnes a mart avec des sursis indefinis: we have aft interval, and then our place knows us no more. Some spend this interval in listlessness, some in high passions, the wisest — at least among "the children of this world
Page 374 - Universal History, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the Great Men who have worked here. They were the leaders of men, these great ones ; the modellers, patterns, and in a wide sense creators, of whatsoever the general mass of men contrived to do or to attain...
Page 438 - He has his eyes on all his company ; he is tender towards the bashful, gentle towards the distant, and merciful towards the absurd ; he can recollect to whom he is speaking; he guards against unseasonable allusions or topics which may irritate ; he is seldom prominent in conversation, and never wearisome.
Page 408 - ... hearers, — certain of whom, I for one, still kept eagerly listening in hope ; the most had long before given up, and formed (if the room were large enough) secondary humming groups of their own.
Page 388 - The latest gospel in this world is: "Know thy work, and do it." "Know thyself:" long enough has that poor "self" of thine tormented thee; thou wilt never get to "know" it, I believe! Think it not thy business, this of knowing thyself, thou art an unknowable individual; know what thou canst work at, and work at it like a Hercules!

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