The Works of that Learned and Judicious Divine, Mr. Richard Hooker: With an Account of His Life and Death, Volume 1

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 424 - When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
Page 382 - And they stirred up the people and the elders and the scribes, and came upon him, and caught him and brought him to the council, and set up false witnesses, which said ; This man ceaseth not to speak blasphemous words against this holy place and the law. For we have heard him say ; That this Jesus of Nazareth shall destroy this place, and shall change the customs which Moses delivered us.
Page 155 - ... if celestial spheres should forget their wonted motions, and by irregular volubility turn themselves any way as it might happen ; if the prince of the lights of heaven, which now as a giant doth run his unwearied course, should, as it were, through a languishing faintness, begin to stand, and to rest himself ; if the moon should wander from her beaten way, the times and seasons of the year blend themselves by disordered and confused mixture, the winds breathe out their last gasp...
Page 301 - Where is the wise ? where is the scribe ? where is the disputer of this world ? hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world ? For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.
Page 583 - Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. Ask of me, and I will give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession.
Page 236 - For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving: For it is sanctified by the word of God and prayer.
Page 155 - .—— nature should intermit her course, and leave altogether though it were but for a while the observation of her own laws;' if those principal and mother elements of the world, whereof all things in this lower world are made, should lose the qualities which now they have; if the frame of that heavenly arch erected over our heads should loosen and dissolve itself; if celestial spheres...
Page 547 - Touching musical harmony, whether by instrument or by voice, it being but of high and low in sounds a due proportionable disposition, such notwithstanding is the force thereof, and so pleasing effects it hath in that very part of man which is most divine, that some have been thereby induced to think that the soul itself by nature is, or hath in it harmony...
Page 17 - was a man of a tender constitution;" and " that it was " best for him to have a wife, that might prove a nurse to " him ; such an one as might both prolong his life, and " make it more comfortable ; and such a one she could and " would provide for him, if he thought fit to marry.
Page 188 - ... till by experience they found this for all parts very inconvenient, so as the thing which they had devised for a remedy did indeed but increase the sore which it should have cured. They saw that to live by one man's will became the cause of all men's misery.

Bibliographic information