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portrayed for Ricardo, now seriously attentive, a Heyst fattened by years of private and public rapines, the murderer of Morrison, the swindler of many shareholders, a wonderful mixture of craft and impudence, of deep purposes and simple wiles, of mystery and futility. In this exercise of his natural function Schomberg revived, the colour coming back to his face, loquacious, florid, eager, his manliness set off by the military bearing. “That's the exact story. He was seen hanging about this part of the world for years, spying into everybody's business; but I am the only one who has seen through him from the first—contemptible, double-faced, stick-atnothing, dangerous fellow.” “Dangerous, is he?” Schomberg came to himself at the sound of Ricardo's voice. “Well, you know what I mean,” he said uneasily. “A lying, circumventing, soft-spoken, polite, stuck-up rascal. Nothing open about him.” Mr. Ricardo had slipped off the table, and was prowling about the room in an oblique, noiseless manner. He flashed a grin at Schomberg in passing, and a snarling: “Ah! H’m l’’ “Well, what more dangerous do you want?” argued Schomberg. “He’s in no way a fighting man, I believe,” he added negligently. “And you say he has been living alone there?” “Like the man in the moon,” answered Schomberg readily. “There's no one that cares a rap what becomes of him. He has been lying low, you understand, after bagging all that plunder.” “Plunder, eh? Why didn't he go home with it?” inquired Ricardo. The henchman of “plain Mr. Jones”, was beginning to think that this was something worth looking into. And he was pursuing truth in the manner of men of sounder morality and purer intentions than his own; that is he pursued it in the light of his own experience and prejudices. For facts, whatever their origin (and God only knows where they come from), can be only tested by our own particular suspicions. Ricardo was suspicious all round. Schomberg, such is the tonic power of recov. ered self-esteem, Schomberg retorted fearlessly: “Go home? Why don’t you go home? To hear your talk, you must have made a pretty considerable pile going round winning people's money. You ought to be ready by this time.” Ricardo stopped to look at Schomberg with surprise. “You think yourself very clever, don't you?” he said, Schomberg just then was so conscious of being clever that the snarling irony left him unmoved. There was positively a smile in his noble Teutonic beard, the first smile for weeks. He was in a felicitous vein. “How do you know that he wasn’t thinking of going home? As a matter of fact, he was on his way home.” “And how do I know that you are not amusing yourself by spinning out a blamed fairy tale?” interrupted Ricardo roughly. “I wonder at myself listening to the silly rot!” Schomberg received this turn of temper unmoved. He did not require to be very subtly observant to notice that he had managed to arouse some sort of feeling, perhaps of greed, in Ricardo's breast. “You won't believe me? Well! You can ask anybody that comes here if that—that Swede hadn't got as far as this house on his way home. Why should he turn up here if not for that? You ask anybody.” “Ask, indeed!” returned the other. “Catch me asking at large about a man I mean to drop on! Such jobs must be done on the quiet—or not at all.” The peculiar intonation of the last phrase touched the nape of Schomberg's neck with a chill. He cleared his throat slightly and looked away as though he had heard something indelicate. Then, with a jump as it were: “Of course he didn’t tell me. Is it likely? But haven’t I got eyes? Haven't I got my common sense to tell me? I can see through people. By the same token, he called on the Tesmans. Why did he call on the Tesmans two days running, eh? You don't know? You can't tell?” He waited complacently till Ricardo had finished swearing quite openly at him for a confounded chatterer, and then went on : “A fellow doesn’t go to a counting-house in business hours for a chat about the weather, two days running. Then why? To close his account with them one day, and to get his money out the next! Clear, what?” Ricardo, with his trick of looking one way and moving another, approached Schomberg slowly. “To get his money?” he purred. “Gewiss,” snapped Schomberg with impatient superi. ority. “What else? That is, only the money he had with the Tesmans. What he has buried or put away on the island, devil only knows. When you think of the lot of hard cash that passed through that man’s hands, for wages and stores and all that—and he's just a cunning thief, I tell you.” Ricardo's hard stare discomposed the hotel-keeper, and he added in an embarrassed tone: “I mean a common, sneaking thief—no account at all. And he calls himself a Swedish baron, too ! Tfui !” “He’s a baron, is he? That foreign nobility ain’t much,” commented Mr. Ricardo seriously, “And then what? He hung about here?” “Yes, he hung about,” said Schomberg, making a wry mouth. “He—hung about. That's it. Hung—” His voice died out. Curiosity was depicted in Ricardo's COuntenance. “Just like that; for nothing? And then turned about and went back to that island again?”

“And went back to that island again,” Schomberg tchoed lifelessly, fixing his gaze on the floor. “What's the matter with you?” asked Ricardo with genuine surprise. “What is it?” Schomberg, without looking up, made an impatient gesture. His face was crimson, and he kept it lowered. Ricardo went back to the point. “Well, but how do you account for it? What was his reason? What did he go back to the island for?” “Honeymoon!” spat out Schomberg viciously. Perfectly still, his eyes downcast, he suddenly, with no preliminary stir, hit the table with his fist a blow which caused the utterly unprepared Ricardo to leap aside. And only then did Schomberg look up with a dull, resentful expression. Ricardo stared hard for a moment, spun on his heel, walked to the end of the room, came back smartly and muttered a profound “Ay! Ay!” above Schomberg's rigid head. That the hotel-keeper was capable of a great moral effort was proved by a gradual return of his severe, Lieutenant-of-the-Reserve manner. “Ay, ay!” repeated Ricardo more deliberately than before, and as if after a further survey of the circumstances. “I wish I hadn’t asked you, or that you had told me a lie. It don’t suit me to know that there's a woman mixed up in this affair. What's she like? It's the girl you 5 * “Leave off!” muttered Schomberg, utterly pitiful behind his stiff military front. e “Ay, ay!” Ricardo ejaculated for the third time, more and more enlightened and perplexed. “Can’t bear to talk about it—so bad as that? And yet I would bet she isn't a miracle to look at.” Schomberg made a gesture as if he didn't know, as if he didn't care. Then he squared his shoulders and frowned at Vacancy.

“Swedish baron—h’m !” Ricardo continued meditatively. “I believe the governor would think that business worth looking up, quite, if I put it to him properly. The governor likes a duel, if you will call it so; but I don’t know a man that can stand up to him on the square. Have you ever seen a cat play with a mouse? It's a pretty sight.” Ricardo, with his voluptuously gleaming eyes and the coy expression, looked so much like a cat that Schomberg would have felt all the alarm of a mouse if other feelings had not had complete possession of his breast. “There are no lies between you and me,” he said, more steadily than he thought he could speak. “What's the good now? He funks women. In that Mexican pueblo where we lay grounded on our beefbones, so to speak, I used to go to dances of an evening. The girls there would ask me if the English caballero in the posada was a monk in disguise, or if he had taken a vow to the sanctissima madre not to speak to a woman or whether You can imagine what fairly free-spoken girls will ask when they come to the point of not caring what they say; and it used to vex me. Yes, the governor funks facing women.” “One woman?” interjected Schomberg in guttural toneS. “One may be more awkward to deal with than two, or two hundred, for that matter. In a place that's full of women you needn't look at them unless you like; but if you go into a room where there is only one woman, young or old, pretty or ugly, you have got to face her. And, unless you are after her, then—the governor is right enough—she's in the way.” “Why notice them?” muttered Schomberg. “What can they do?” “Make a noise, if nothing else,” opined Mr. Ricardo curtly, with the distaste of a man whose path is a path

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