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David was elected a prophet and a king,
He slew the great Goliah, with a stone within a sling:
Yet these were not knightes of the table round;
Nor St. George, St. George, who the dragon did

confound. St. George he was for England; St.Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

Jephthah and Gideon did lead their men to fight, They conquered the Amorites, and put them all to

flight: Hercules his labours 'were on the plaines of Basse; And Sampson slew a thousand with the jawbone of

an asse, And eke he threw a temple downe, and did a mighty

spoyle: But St. George, St. George he did the dragon føyle. St. George he was for England; St.Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense. .

The warres of ancient monarchs it were too long to

tell, And likewise of the Romans, how farre they did excell; Hannyball and Scipio in many a fielde did fighte: Orlando Furioso he was a worthy knighte : Remus and Romulus, were they that Rome did builde: ·

But St. George, St. George the dragon made to yielde. St. George he was for England; St.Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense. VOL, III.

The

BB

The noble Alphonso, that was the Spanish king, The order of the red scarffes and bandrolles in did

bring *: He had a troope of mighty knightes, when first he

did begin, Which sought adventures farre and neare, that con

quest they might win; The ranks of the Pagans he often put to flight:

But St. George, St. George did with the dragon fight. St. George he was for England; St.Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

Many ‘knights' have fought with proud Tamberlaine :
Cutlax the Dane, great warres he did maintaine:
Rowland of Beame, and good ‘sir' Olivere
In the forest of Acon slew both woolfe and beare :
Besides that noble Hollander, 'sir' Goward with the bill :

But St. George, St. George the dragon's blood did spill. St. George he was for England; St. Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

Valentine and Orson were of king Pepin's blood : Alfride and Henry they were brave knightes and good. The four sons of Aymon, that follow'd Charlemaine : Sir Hughon of Burdeaux, and Godfrey of Bullaine:

* This probably alludes to "An Ancient Order of Knight

called the Order of the Band, instituted by Don Al“ phonsus, king of Spain, ... to wear a red riband of three “ fingers breadth," &c. See Ames, Typog. p. 327.

These

These were all French knightes that lived in that age:

But St. George, St. George the dragon did assuage. St. George he was for England; St. Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

Bevis conquered Ascapart, and after slew the boare, And then he crost beyond the seas to combat with the

moore:

Sir Isenbras and Eglamore, they were knightes most

bold;

And good Sir John Mandeville of travel much hath

told : There were many English knights that Pagans did

convert : But St George, St. George plucktout the dragon's heart. St. George he was for England; St. Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

The noble earl of Warwick, that was callid sir Guy,
The infidels and pagans stoutlie did defie;
He slew the giant Brandimore, and after was the death
Of that most ghastly dun cowe, the divell of Dunsmore

heath;
Besides his noble deeds all done beyond the seas :

But St. George, St. George the dragon did appease. St. George he was for England; St.Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

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Richard Cour-de-lion, erst king of this land,
He the lion gored with his naked hand * :
The false duke of Austria nothing did he feare;
But his son he killed with a boxe on the eare;
Besides his famous actes done in the holy lande:

But St. George, St. George the dragon did withstande. St. George he was for England; St. Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense.

Henry the fifth he conquered all France,
And quartered their arms, his honour to advance :
He their cities razed, and threw their castles downe,
And his head he honoured with a double crowne:
He thumped the French-men, and after home he came:

But St. George, St. George he did the dragon tame. St. George he was for England; St. Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense. .

St. David of Wales the Welsh-men much advance :
St. Jaques of Spaine, that never yet broke lance :
St. Patricke of Ireland, which was St. Georges boy,
Seven yeares he kept his horse, and then stole him

away : For which knavish act, as slaves they doe remaine :

But St. George, St. George the dragon he hath slaine. St. George he was for England; St. Dennis was for France;

Sing, Honi soit qui mal y pense. * Alluding to the fabulous Exploits attributed to this King in the old Romances. See the Dissertation prefixed to this volume.

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XV.

ST. GEORGE FOR ENGLAND,

THE SECOND PART,

was written by John GRUBB, M. A. of Christ Church, Oxford. The occasion of its being composed is said to have been as follows. A set of gentlemen of the university had formed themselves into a Club, all the members of which were to be of the name of George: their anniversary feast was to be held on St. George's day. Our Author solicited strongly to be admitted ; but his name being unfortunately John, this disqualification was dispensed with only upon this condition, that he would compose a song in honour of their Patron Saint, and would every year produce one or more new stanzas, to be sung on their annual festival. This gave birth to the following humorous performance, the several stanzas of which were the produce of many successive anniversaries *.

This diverting poem was long handed about in manuscript; at length a friend of GRUBB's undertook to get it printed, who, not keeping pace with the impatience of his friends, was addressed in the following whimsical macaronic lines, which, in such a collection as this, may not improperly accompany the poem itself.

* To this circumstance it is owing that the Editor has never met with two copies in which the stanzas are arranged alike: he has therefore thrown them into what appeared the most natural order. The verses are properly long Alexandrines, but the narrowness of the page made it necessary to subdivide them: they are here printed with many improvements.

EXPOSTU

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