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seventy links; then north nine degrees west, eighteen chains and sixty links to a white oak tree at the southwest corner of the land occupied in 1814 by Thomas Wilsey; then north eleven degrees east, seventy-seven chains to the north side of a highway where it is met by a fence dividing the possession of said Thomas Wilsey, junior, and Emery Hunt; then north forty-six degrees east, six chains; then south sixty-six degrees east, twenty-six chains and twenty-five links; then north nine degrees east, twenty-seven chains and fifty links to a blue slate stone anciently set up for the southwest corner of Bennington; then north seven degrees and thirty minutes east, forty-six miles, forty-three chains and fifty links to a bunch of hornbeam saplings on the south bank of Poultney river, the northernmost of which was marked by the last mentioned commissioners, and from which a large butternut tree bears north seventy degrees west, thirty links, a large hard maple tree south two chains and eightysix links, and a white ash tree on the north side of the river, north seventy-seven degrees east; which several lines from the monument erected for the southwest corner of the State of Vermont, were established by the last mentioned commissioners, and were run by them as the magnetic needle pointed in the year 1814; then down the Poultney river through its deepest channel to East bay; then through the middle of the deepest channel of East bay and its waters to where the same communicate with Lake Champlain; then through the middle of the deepest channel of Lake Champlain to the eastward of the islands called the Four Brothers, and the westward of the islands called the Grand isle and Long isle, or the Two Heroes, and to the westward of the Isle La Mott to the line in the forty-fifth degree of north latitude, established by treaty for the boundary line between the United States and the British dominions; then west along that line to the River St. Lawrence; then along the line established by the commissioners appointed under the sixth article of the treaty of Ghent, into and up the River St. Lawrence to the waters of Lake Ontario; then along the same line, through the waters of that lake and of the Niagara river to the waters of Lake Erie; then westerly through the same, and along the said line until intersected by a meridian line drawn through the most westerly bent or inclination of Lake Ontario; then south along such meridian line to a monument in the beginning of the fortythird degree of north latitude, erected in the year 1787 by Abraham Hardenburgh and William W. Morris, commissioners on the part of this state, and Andrew Ellicott and Andrew Porter, commissioners on the part of the State of Pennsylvania, for the purpose of marking the termination of the line of jurisdiction between this state and the State of Pennsylvania; then east along the line established and marked by the last mentioned commissioners to the ninetieth milestone in the same parallel of latitude, erected in the year 1786 by James Clinton and Simeon De Witt, commissioners on the part of this state, and Andrew Ellicott, commissioner on the part of Pennsylvania, which ninetieth milestone stands on the western side of the south branch of the Tioga river; then east along the line established and marked by the last mentioned commissioners, to a stone erected in the year 1774 on a small island in the Delaware river, by Samuel Holland and David Rittenhouse, commissioners on the part of the colonies of New York and Pennsylvania, for the purpose of marking the beginning of the forty-third degree of north latitude; then down along the Delaware river to a point opposite to the fork or branch formed by the junction of the stream called Mahackamask with the Delaware river, in the latitude of forty-one degrees twenty-one minutes thirty-seven seconds north; then in a straight line to the termination on the east bank of the Delaware river, of a line run in the year 1774, by William Wickham and Samuel Gale, commissioners on the part of the then colony of New York, and John Stevens and Walter Rutherford, commissioners on the part of the then colony of New Jersey; then along that line to a rock on the west side of the Hudson river, in the latitude of forty-one degrees north, marked by those commissioners; thence in continuation of that line in the same direction, to a point in the middle of the river, opposite that rock; thence along the middle of the river, of the bay of New York, of the waters between Staten island and New Jersey, and of Raritan bay to the main sea, and then to the place of beginning, including Staten island, and the islands of meadow on the west side thereof, Shooter's island, Long island, the Isle of Wight, now called Gardiner's island, Fisher's island, Shelter island, Plumb island, Robins island, Ram island, the Gull islands, and all the waters of the bay of New York within the bounds above described, and including also Bedlow's and Ellis' islands, and all the islands in the bay of New York, whether within the bounds above described or not; subject, however, to the provisions of a certain agreement between this state and the State of New Jersey, dated on the 16th day of September, 1833, which are as follows:

ARTICLE FIRST. The boundary line between the two states of New York and New Jersey, from a point in the middle of Hudson river opposite the point on the west shore thereof, in the forty-first degree of north latitude, as heretofore ascertained and marked, to the main sea, shall be the middle of the said river, of the bay of New York, of the waters between Staten island and New Jersey, and of Raritan bay to the main sea, except as hereinafter otherwise particularly mentioned.

ARTICLE SECOND. The State of New York shall

retain its present jurisdiction of and over Bedlow's and Ellis' islands, and shall also retain ,exclusive jurisdiction of and over the other islands lying in the waters above mentioned, and now under the jurisdiction of that state.

ARTICLE THIRD. The State of New York shall have and enjoy exclusive jurisdiction of and over all the waters of the bay of New York, and of and over all waters of Hudson river lying west of Manhattan island, and to the south of the mouth of Spuytenduyvel creek, and of and over the lands covered by the said waters to the low-water mark on the westerly or New Jersey side thereof; subject to the following rights of property and of jurisdiction of the State of New Jersey, that is to say:

1. The State of New Jersey shall have the exclusive right of property in and to the land under water lying west of the middle of the bay of New York, and west of the middle of that part of the Hudson river which lies between Manhattan island and New Jersey

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