Knowledge Management in the Intelligence Enterprise

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Artech House, 2003 - Business & Economics - 357 pages
If you are responsible for the management of an intelligence enterprise operation and its timely and accurate delivery of reliable intelligence to key decision-makers, this book is must reading. It is the first easy-to-understand, system-level book that specifically applies knowledge management principles, practices and technologies to the intelligence domain. The book describes the essential principles of intelligence, from collection, processing and analysis, to dissemination for both national intelligence and business applications.

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Selected pages

Contents

51 The Basis of Analysis and Synthesis
160
52 The Reasoning Processes
167
522 Inductive Reasoning
168
523 Abductive Reasoning
173
53 The Integrated Reasoning Process
175
54 Analysis and Synthesis As a Modeling Process
180
55 Intelligence Targets in Three Domains
186
56 Summary
190

153 KM
22
16 The Organization of This Book
23
Endnotes
24
Selected Bibliography
26
The Intelligence Enterprise
29
22 Intelligence Processes and Products
33
23 Intelligence Collection Sources and Methods
35
231 HUMINT Collection
37
232 Technical Intelligence Collection
38
24 Collection and Process Planning
40
25 KM in the Intelligence Process
42
26 Intelligence Process Assessments and Reengineering
44
261 Balancing Collection and Analysis
45
263 Balancing AnalysisSynthesis Processes
46
27 The Future of Intelligence
48
Endnotes
51
Knowledge Management Processes
55
31 Knowledge and Its Management
56
32 Tacit and Explicit Knowledge
62
321 Knowledge As Object
63
322 Knowledge As Process
68
323 Knowledge Creation Model
71
33 An Intelligence Use Case Spiral
74
331 The Situation
75
332 Socialization
77
333 Externalization
78
334 Combination
79
337 Summary
80
35 Intelligence As Capital
85
36 Intelligence Business Strategy and Models
93
37 Intelligence Enterprise Architecture and Applications
96
371 Customer Relationship Management
98
373 Business Intelligence
100
38 Summary
102
Endnotes
104
The KnowledgeBased Intelligence Organization
107
41 Virtues and Disciplines of the KnowledgeBased Organization
109
411 Establishing Organizational Values and Virtues
110
412 Mapping the Structures of Organizational Knowledge
112
413 Identifying Communities of Organizational Practice
115
414 Initiating KM Projects
117
415 Communicating Tacit Knowledge by Storytelling
118
42 Organizational Learning
121
421 Defining and Measuring Learning
122
422 Organizational Knowledge Maturity Measurement
123
423 Learning Modes
125
43 Organizational Collaboration
129
431 Collaborative Culture
131
432 Collaborative Environments
133
433 Collaborative Intelligence Workflow
137
44 Organizational Problem Solving
142
441 Critical Structured Thinking
143
442 Systems Thinking
147
443 Naturalistic Decision Making
150
The Best Practices of Intelligence
151
46 Summary
153
Principles of Intelligence Analysis and Synthesis
159
Endnotes
191
The Practice of Intelligence Analysis and Synthesis
195
61 Intelligence Consumer Expectations
196
62 AnalysisSynthesis in the Intelligence Workflow
198
63 Applying Automation
203
64 The Role of the Human Analyst
205
65 Addressing Cognitive Shortcomings
207
66 Marshaling Evidence and Structuring Argumentation
209
661 Structuring Hypotheses
210
662 Marshaling Evidence and Structuring Arguments
211
663 Structured Inferential Argumentation
213
664 Inferential Networks
215
67 Evaluating Competing Hypotheses
223
68 Countering Denial and Deception
229
69 Summary
235
Knowledge Internalization and Externalization
241
72 Storage Query and Retrieval Services
245
722 Information Retrieval
247
73 Cognitive Analytic Tool Services
249
74 Intelligence Production Dissemination and Portals
256
75 HumanMachine Information Transactions and Interfaces
264
752 AnalystAgent Interaction
265
76 Summary
267
Endnotes
268
Explicit Knowledge Capture and Combination
271
81 Explicit Capture Representation and Automated Reasoning
272
82 Automated Combination
275
821 Data Fusion
277
822 Data Mining
283
823 Integrated Data Fusion and Mining
288
83 Intelligence Modeling and Simulation
289
831 MS for IW
292
832 Modeling Complex Situations and Human Behavior
293
84 Summary
294
The Intelligence Enterprise Architecture
299
91 Intelligence Enterprise Operations
300
92 Describing the Enterprise Architecture
302
A Small CI Enterprise
306
931 The Value Proposition
308
932 The CI Business Process
309
933 The CI Business Process Functional Flow
312
934 The CI Unit Organizational Structure and Relationships
315
935 A Typical Operational Scenario
316
936 CI System Abstraction
318
937 System and Technical Architecture Descriptions
319
94 Summary
322
Endnotes
324
Knowledge Management Technologies
327
102 KM Research for National Security Applications
331
103 A KM Technology Roadmap
332
104 Key KM Technologies
335
1042 HumanComputer TacitExplicit Exchange Technologies
337
1043 KnowledgeBased Organization Technologies
339
105 Summary
340
About the Author
343
Index
345
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 121 - Senge describes learning organizations as places "where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire , where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning how to learn together
Page 303 - Technical architecture is a minimal set of rules governing the arrangement, interaction, and interdependence of the parts or elements whose purpose is to ensure that a conformant system satisfies a specified set of requirements.
Page 4 - See what the land is like, and whether the people who live there are strong or weak, few or many.
Page 295 - Fusion as: a process dealing with the association, correlation, and combination of data and information from single and multiple sources to achieve refined position and identity estimates, and complete and timely assessments of situations and threats, and their significance.
Page 4 - The means by which enlightened rulers and sagacious generals moved and conquered others, that their achievements surpassed the masses, was advance knowledge. "Advance knowledge cannot be gained from ghosts and spirits, inferred from phenomena, or projected from the measures of Heaven, but must be gained from men for it is the knowledge of the enemy's true situation.
Page 121 - The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.
Page 57 - Knowledge management is therefore a conscious strategy of getting the right knowledge to the right people at the right time and helping people share and put information into action in ways that strive to improve organizational performance.
Page 5 - It is by comparing a variety of information, we are frequently enabled to investigate facts, which were so intricate or hidden, that no single clue could have led to the knowledge of them in this point of view, intelligence becomes interesting which but from its connection and collateral circumstances, would not be important [8].
Page 114 - Benchmarking is the process of identifying, learning, and adapting outstanding practices and processes from any organization, anywhere in the world, to help an organization improve its performance.

About the author (2003)

Ed Waltz is the technical director of intelligence systems with the Veridian Systems Division, Applied Science and Technology Sector

Bibliographic information