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REPORT OF VECROLOGIST.

Mr. Thomas was for many years a leader of his race in Chicago. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 291.)

ALBERT C. Fish, a member of the Chicago bar, aged sixtyfour years, died December 23, 1899. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 292.)

HENRY G. MILLER, who was admitted to the Illinois bar June 26, 1851, died December 11, 1899. He retired from active practice some fifteen years ago. While in health for nearly thirty years he was engaged in his profession and held a prominent place among its leaders. His first partnership was with Thomas Hoyne. Hiram L. Lewis was added soon after, and the firm of Hoyne, Miller & Lewis held perhaps the largest and choicest clientage at that time at the bar. As a lawyer he was always respected by the members of the bench and bar. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 292.)

John T. Long, who was admitted to the Illinois bar February 17, 1871, died December 27, 1899. Mr. Long was well known to the profession as one of the editors of Wood & Long's Illinois Digest and also of Long's Illinois Digest. He was president of Chaddock College at Quincy, Illinois, and was at the time of his death one of the college professors in the Illinois College of Law. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 292.)

JUDGE BENJAMIN F. Parks died in November, 1899. He was admitted to the Illinois bar February 18, 1851. He was a remarkable man, active, strong and eloquent. He had few equals before a jury at the bar. In 1859 he was elected Judge of the Court of Common Appeals of Aurora, which he held for four years. Upon retiring from the bench he resumed the practice of law and continued in that capacity until he was compelled to retire, about a year ago, on account of his failing health. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 293.) RICHARD WATERMAN died January 6, 1900.

He was lineal descendant of Richard Waterman, who, with Roger Wil

a JAMES B. BRADWELL.

liams, was the original founder of Rhode Island. He was admitted to the Illinois bar February 27, 1869, and from then until his death devoted his time to the practice of law and the sale of real estate. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 293.)

GOTTFREID W'. DuWALT died December 9, 1899. He was admitted to the Illinois bar June 14, 1892. He was for many years connected with the Chicago Law Institute, and in 1897 he became main assistant and continued in that position until his death. He was at home in literature, law, science and a thorough linguist. A few months before his death the Illinois Practice Commission selected him as its secretary. For a just tribute to his memory, given by Julius Rosenthal, librarian of the institute, and the resolutions passed by the Illinois Practice Commission, see 6 Obituary Memoranda, pages 293

, and 294.

FREDERICK ROE PRATT started out to make a tour of the world. He reached Manila, when sickness overtook him, and he died. The Pratt brothers were twins, and both lawyers in Chicago. It is said a remarkable telepathic connection existed between them. When Fred died, Frank felt a presentiment of it so strong that he told his parents. This presentiment was verified three days later. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 294.)

E. S. Curtis, of the Chicago bar, died January 31, 1900, of a broken heart, caused by the death of his little son the day before. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 294.)

OWEN G. LOVEJOY, the leader of the Bureau County bar, and son of the celebrated abolitionist, preacher and former congressman, died suddenly at his home in Princeton, February 12, 1900. He was admitted to the Illinois bar September 13, 1873. Mr. Lovejoy ranked high among the lawyers of the State. He was a man of great intellect, a splendid student

REPORT OF NECROLOGIST.

and a polished gentleman, and had he been so inclined, would probably have made his mark in the political life of his state, but he was in love with his profession and preferred to practice the same quietly and diligently, rather than to strive for high political honors. He was a worthy son of a noble father. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 294.)

GENERAL John McNulta died at Washington, February 22, 1900, of heart disease, after an illness of only an hour. He settled permanently in Bloomington in 1859. He was appointed captain of Company A, First Illinois Cavalry, May 3, 1861, lieutenant and colonel of the 94th Illinois Infantry, August 20, 1862, took command of the regiment a few days after it was mustered in, was promoted colonel and afterward brevetted brigadier general for "gallant and meritorious conduct in battle.” He was mustered out of service August 9, 1865. General McNulta was admitted to the Illinois bar April 30, 1866. Upon his admission to the bar he became a member of the law firm of Weldon & McNulta. He was elected to the state senate in 1868, and to congress in 1872 as a republican. In the senate he was celebrated for his great eloquence, power and unflinching integrity. He was a delegate to and a member of the Old Guard in the national convention of 1880, and was awarded a “306," or Grant medal. The General held many positions of trust. He was an incorruptible citizen and brave soldier, a wise legislator and an able and gifted lawyer. He leaves a record behind above reproach. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, pages 295-298.)

HENRY C. VAN SCHAAK died at Denver, March 3, 1900. He was admitted to the Ilinois bar June 7, 1883, was a graduate of the old University of Chicago, of which he was for some years a trustee. He removed to Denver fifteen years ago on account of lung trouble. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 299.)

JAMES DARLOW died March 8, 1900. Mr. Darlow was admitted to the Illinois bar June 14, 1880, and had practiced

JAMES B. BRADWELL.

until within a few months of his death. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 299.)

EDWARD SANFORD, a prominent and wealthy member of the Morris, Illinois bar, died March 18, 1900. Mr. Sanford was a graduate of "Old Eli," and was a perfect machine of system and order. When he went to Morris he soon placed the schools in a first-class condition and still found time to read Blackstone, Chitty and other law works. He was admitted to the Illinois bar October 5, 1857, and first went into partnership with Mr. Seeley, but withdrew at the end of the first year and opened an office alone. His law library was one of the most complete in the county. He was a thirty-second degree Mason. Mr. Sanford was a man of commanding personal appearance. He loved his friends and was beloved by them. He was one whose likes and dislikes were of a pronounced nature. He was a a scholarly and polished gentleman. His home was one of the finest in the city of Morris. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 299.)

HIRAM LA MOTTE Lewis, for many years a prominent member of the Chicago bar, died March 20, 1900, at Cambridge, Mass., at the age of seventy years. He was admitted to the Illinois bar July 23, 1855. Was a member of the law firms of Hoyne, Miller & Lewis, Miller & Lewis, Miller, Van Arman & Lewis, and Miller, Frost & Lewis. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 300.)

WATSON S. HINKLEY died March 29, 1900, at the age of eighty-five years. Mr. Hinkley was admitted to the Illinois bar September 14, 1874. He did not pursue an active practice, but looked after his various investments. He became quite wealthy, established himself at 100 Washington street, and was fond of calling himself “a lawyer without clients.” (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 300.)

DENNIS CLARK, one of the oldest and leading citizens of Knox county, Illinois, and a judge of the county court for

REPORT OF NECROLOGIST.

twentyone years, died at Abingdon May 16, 1900, aged eighty. three years. He settled in Knox county in 1833, and was ad mitted to the Illinois bar January 21, 1867. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 300.)

PHILIP C. LAMBERT, of the Belvidere bar, and a member of this Association, passed away during the year. He was admitted to the Illinois bar June 12, 1883. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 300.)

Paul E. TRELOAR died March 15, 1900. He was admitted to the Illinois bar June 14, 1892. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 300.)

EDWARD A. ROSENTHAL died March 24, 1900. He was admitted to the Illinois bar November 11, 1885. (See 6 Obituary Memoranda, page 300.)

Your Necrologist has written sketches of some and gathered all that he has been able to of the sketches, addresses, resolutions and proceedings of bar associations and bar meetings in relation to the members of the Illinois bar who have died during the year ending June 30, 1900, all of which will be found in 6 Obituary Memoranda, commencing on

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