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- Oh! I am sure I am very glad you are so strong; must say you might as well have told me how much I was doing than was needful, and not let me go on ng and slaving and waiting upon you, when you were e time as capable of waiting on yourself as I am.' was a shame in me,' Aunt Phæbe meekly answered. dear Prissie, your long kind care is come to an end. ne dine with you all to-day, and come down to breakto-morrow, and don't take any more trouble about I am really going to church on Sunday. You know im strong enough to go out, it would not be right in o refrain from going there.' unt Prissie did not say much in reply ; she was very s and snappish, but still slie did not seem as much put as we had expected; and as for the going to church, only replied, 'If you will go, you must ; but do not ect me to sanction such folly.' o when Sunday came she disappeared after dinner, hout even one injunction to Aunt Phæbe to wrap self properly up. I was very glad, for I wanted to keep dear aunt as quiet as possible, and not to have anyone eting about her, and making her more nervous and exd than she was already. Indeed, when it came to the nt, she was trembling so much, that, but for my father's 1, I doubt if she would have been able to get there; 1 when at last she was safely ensconced in the pew,

and ould look at her, I could see the throb of her heart rough her shawl, and the heat drops standing on her ow, and began to fear that the effort was, in truth, bend her strength. But the tears which rolled over her shed cheeks seemed to relieve her, and gradually she imed down, and her face resumed its usual peaceful inquil expression, and the quivering mouth settled into Berene smile of thankfulness, which reminded me of the lemn sweetness of that smile which I had once seen on y dead mother's lips. We had gone early that she VOL. 14.

38

PART 84.

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Aye

, aye !' Aunt Prissie good-humouredly exclaimed. Z those laugh that lose, you may be sure those will ** min. And my father stopt bis merriment, and said kindly, by dear Prissie, I hope with all my heart you will win, bil course I am quite at your service this morning. - are you certain it is wise to take such a step?'

"Can't tell till I have tried, I am sure, Aunt Prissie
dsbortly; ' but I am not going to stay here where

wadi no use, instead of being there where I am sorely
usted. Phæbe, it seems, can quite do without me now,

a there is no reason on her account why I should not go;
od terefore, if you can come and marry us this morning

There was something in her stiff bony figure, her black
Tons and red face, her ill-assorted and ill-arranged dress,

ses formed such an absurd contrast to my beau ideal of a
vodethat I kept perpetually breaking out into little ex-
juncions of laughter. Nor did I feel

less absurd when is and glanced at the poor old gouty bridegroom. But dent Phoebe's smiles soon disappeared, and she went up to

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made us of course all fix our eyes upon her, 'I Frederick, can you meet me in the church this ng ? "hy, not very conveniently,' he answered. Will not fternoon do ? 0," she said, slowly prolonging the word, as if she loth to part with it. Not exactly. The fact is, are such a lot of fools in the world, and they will and so I am going to marry Dr. Ford, to shut the h of gossip; and I thought to-day was as good a day y other, but if you are busy, to-morrow will do as

ere was a dead silence when she ceased speaking ; hen, with one consent, we all three burst out laugh

ye, aye ! Aunt Prissie good-humouredly exclaimed. those laugh that lose, you may be sure those will win.' nd my father stopt bis merriment, and said kindly,

dear Prissie, I hope with all my heart you will win, of course I am quite at your service this morning. are you certain it is wise to take such a step ?' Can't tell till I bave tried, I am sure,' Aunt Prissie ed, shortly ; but I am not going to stay here where

of no use, instead of being there where I am sorely ted. Phæbe, it seems, can quite do without me non, here is no reason on her account why I should not go; therefore, if you can come and marry us this morning ould be glad. There was something in her stiff bony figure, her black ws and red face, her ill-assorted and ill-arranged dress, i formed such an absurd contrast to my beau ideal of a le, that I kept perpetually breaking out into little exsions of laughter. Nor did I feel it less absurd when mind glanced at the poor old gouty bridegroom. But nt Phoebe's smiles soon disappeared, and she went up to ning

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, and were acting from a kind of constraint. Nor li Sone's observation throw much light on my mind, in I asked her why she had not come to see Miss Site married. 'Bless you, Missey! she said, 'I have a married myself

, and know how bad it is; I never that to see anybody look so foolish.

De and Mrs. Ford returned to the vicarage for half an w that she might change her dress, and Aunt Phæbe sk the opportunity of telling him what a kind and skil

Al purse she had found Aunt Prissie.
'You are a good soul,' he said, shaking her kindly by
de hand. "She will soon learn my ways, I dare say;
ser fear

, we shall get on very well together ; she will do Tele's bid. Ah! Miss Hattie, I can see in your saucy grs that you think that is a doubt. But husbands have tys of making themselves minded, as you will find some by to our cost

. You and my good friend Phæbe here, must come and see us very often. I shall not be able to que my wife; but run in and out of the house just as sa like. I shall be always glad to see you. Oh, here

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e, and were acting from a kind of constraint. Nor urse's observation throw much light on my mind,

I asked her why she had not come to see Miss e married. 'Bless you, Missey ! she said, 'I have married myself, and know how bad it is; I never to see anybody look so foolish.' • and Mrs. Ford returned to the vicarage for half an that she might change her dress, and Aunt Phæbe the opportunity of telling him what a kind and skil. urse she had found Aunt Prissie. zou are a good soul,' he said, shaking her kindly by hand. She will soon learn my ways, I dare say; er fear, we shall get on very well together; she will do ne's bid. Ah! Miss Hattie, I can see in your saucy

that you think that is a doubt. But husbands have s of making themselves minded, as you will find some to your cost. You and my good friend Phæbe here, it come and see us very often. I shall not be able to re my wife; but run in and out of the house just as like. I shall be always glad to see you. Oh, here comes ! And Aunt Prissie entered bonnetted and shawled for little journey they intended taking. Now Doctor,'

said, cheerfully, 'I am quite at your service,' and she ered him her arm; then recollecting herself, she dived r hand down into her capacious pocket, and drawing t the keys, threw them on the table, and added, “I bad most forgotten them, but there they are, Phæbe; I canot carry

the keys of two households. Now, Doctor.' And with the briefest and most careless adieux she urried him off, Even Aunt Phæbe had only time for ne look of affection, and one fervent 'God bless you ! The keys laid for a time unregarded, and then she took hem up and gave them to me, and said, 'Hattie dear, I iave never been used to household affairs, and am too old o learn; you must be housekeeper.' But I pressed them

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